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Cooper- Hew itf Miw.wi LfBhctry 

2 East 9 ist Street 
New York, New York 10028 






THE BOOK OF THE 

EXHIBITION OF 

HOUSES AND 

COTTAGES 

ROMFORD GARDEN SUBURB 
GIDEA PARK 



/oj 




" Houses are built to live in " 

Francis, Lord Bacon 

(Grandson of Sii Thomas Cooke of Gidea Hall) 



PUBLISHED FOR THE EXHIBITION COMMITTEE 
33 HENRIETTA ST • LONDON • W- C • MCMXI 



And in our towns the prospect gives delight 
That opens up the country to our sight 



ERRATA 



ge 27. — Line 5 from bottom: for "John C. French" 
read " John C. Thresh " ; aJso name under portrait. 

ge 59. — In the description of the most convenient route 
from the station for " Heath " read " Heath 
Drive." 

„ „ Line 6 from bottom : add Nos. 329, 332, 337. 

„ „ Line 2 from bottom : delete Nos. 332, 337. 

o-<: 144. — The name of the Special Exhibit described on 
1 this page should be " RISEBRIDGE ROAD," not 

" MEAD WAY," and the number should be 292, 

not 267. 



1 5 , 

Or'' 



I . 

2. 

3- 

4- 

5- 



CONTENTS. 

Objects of the Exhibition ...... . . 

The President, Vice-Presidents, and Judges ..... 

List of Architects ......... 

A Brief Account of the Exhibition ...... 

What is Wrong with your House and How it is to be Bettered . 

By Thomas Hardy, O.M., Alfred Russell Wallace, O.M., Sir Edward 
Poynter, P.R.A., Sir Hiram Maxim, Sir Arthur Pinero, Mrs. Ayrton, 
M.I.E.E., Arnold Bennett, A. C. Benson, E. F. Benson, Miss Betham- 
Edwards, Hall Caine, Walter Crane, Mrs. Despard, Mrs. Henry 
Fawcett, the Headmaster of Eton, " Home Counties," W. W. Jacobs, 
J. K. Jerome, Benjamin Kidd, Mrs. John Lane, C. A. McCurdy, M.P., 
George Morrow, Eden Phillpotts, J. Tudor Walters, M.P., H. G. 
Wells, Israel Zangwill, and a Medical Officer of Health. 

6. The Most Deplorable Spectacle in England . . . . . 

By Sir Frederick Treves, G.C.V.O., Serjeant Surgeon to the King. 

The Historic Site of the Exhibition .... 



7 



9 
io 

i i 

12 

r 3 

H 



The Royal Liberty of Havering-atte-Bower . 

Romford Long Years Ago ..... 

A Story of Old Romford 

The Strange Eventful History of Gidea Hall 
Gidea Park of To-day ..... 

The New Garden Suburb ...... 

The Future of the Suburb. By the President of the Local Governmen 
Board ........ 

The Town Planning Competition for the Garden Suburb . 
Gidea Park and Its Environs ..... 

How to see the Exhibition most Conveniently (with a Map) 

Index to Houses (by Numbers) ..... 

Index to Architects and Builders ..... 

Catalogue of Houses, with Plans and Sketches of each, and the 
Architects' and Builders' Names ...... 

List of Competitions ......... 

How to get to the Exhibition by Rail and Road (with City Trains) 
The Ark-adians. Bv David Wilson ...... 

Where to obtain Refreshments ....... 

Advertisements. 



Page 

7 
8 

io 

12 

l 7 



3° 

33 

• 34 

37 
40 

41 
48 

5° 

53 
54 
56 

59 

59 
60 

61 

H5 

H7 
149 

J 5° 



n^(p£ 



r\ t~) j^\ jr^ /j s~>i j~* " Fifteen thousand Families move every 

^^^ v_^/^_-/ year from Inner to Outer London" said 

the President of the Focal Government Board, speaking in the 
Romford Garden Suburb, in fitly, 1910. 

C^ The provision of homes for this co?istantly i?icr easing population of 
Outer London is largely left to the uncertain, unscientific, uneconomical^ 
unsocial and inartistic activities of the Speculative Builder. 

Cj^ The Objects of the Exhibition are : 

To demonstrate to Housing and Town Planning Authorities, to Builders and to 
the Public generally, the improvement in modern housing and building, due to the 
advance of Scientific Knowledge, the Revival of Arts and Crafts, and the Progress 
of the Garden Suburb movement, and by so doing to assist in raising the standard of 
Housing, not only in the Outer Metropolis, but throughout Great Britain. 

CF, The Exhibition has been rendered possible by the co-operatio?i of 
100 Architects, who have designed and built for the Exhibition 
(a) Small Mouses, costing £$00 ; and fbj Cottages, costing ^3 7 5 . 
These are the classes of dwellings of which the larger part of Outer 
London must necessarily be built. 

C^ The Exhibition, which is interesting also for its Qardens, planned 
and planted in artistic relation to the Houses and Cottages to which 
they belong, represents the best procurable skill of Architects, 
Builders and Garden Designers at the prese?it day ; consists of 
1 4.0 Completely Finished and in many cases Furnished Houses and 
Cottages, built at a cost of £60,000 ; occupies a larger space than 
the JVhite City at Shepherd s Bush ; and, to be viewed properly, 
calls for three visits of six hours each. 



PART OF THE EXHIBITION FROM THE ROOF OF GIDEA HALL 

" Woods that let mansions through, and cottaged vales, with fields beyond " 





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HOUSE & COTTAGE EXHIBITION 

PRESIDENT : 
The Right Hon. JOHN BURNS, M.P., 
President of the Local Government Board. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS : 



The Archbishop of Canterbury 

The Archbishop of Westminster 

The Earl of Crewe, k.g. 

The Earl of Warwick (Lord Lieutenant of Essex) 

The Countess of Warwick 

The Bishop of London 

The Bishop of St Albans 

The Viscountess Frankfort 

Lord Avebury, f.r.s. 

Lord Curzon of Kedleston, g.c.s.i., g.ci.e. 

Lord Rayleigh, o.m., f.r.s. 

Lady Rayleigh 

Lord O'Hagan 

Lord Claud Hamilton (Chairman of the 

Great Eastern Railway Company) 
The Right Hon. Sir Edward Clarke, p.c. 
The Right Hon. Sir Algernon West, p.c, g.c.b. 
The Right Hon. Walter Long, p.c, m.p. 



The Right Hon. Mark Lockwood, p.c, m.p. 

Sir William Chance, Bart. 

Sir J. Fortescue Flannery, Bart., m.p. 

Sir Hiram Maxim 

Sir E. J. Poynter, Bart., p.r.a. 

Sir Herbert H. Raphael, Bart., m.p. 

Sir Frederick Treves, Bart., g.c.v.o. 

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, o.m., r.a. 

Lieut. -Gen. Sir R. S. S. Baden-Powell, k.cb. 

Sir John Bethell, m.p. 

Col. Sir David Bruce, c.b., f.r.s., a.m.s. 

Sir George Gibb (Chairman of the Rood 

Board) 
Sir Oliver Lodge, f.r.s. 
Sir John Simon, k.c, m.p. 
Sir Aston Webb, r.a. 
Sir Charles Wyndham 
The Dean of Norwich 



The Archdeacon of London 

Canon Scott-Holland 

The Rev. the Hon. Edward Lyttelton 

Alfred Austin, Esq. (Poet Laureate) 

Arnold Bennett, Esq. 

Arthur C. Benson, Esq., c.v.o. 

George Cadbury, Esq. 

Hall Caine, Esq. 

Walter Crane, Esq., r.w.s. 

Theodore A. Cook, Esq. 

Alfred Hoare, Esq. 

Andrew Johnston, Esq. (Chairman of the 

Essex County Council) 
Henry Arthur Jones, Esq. 
Arthur T. Keen, Esq., f.r.i.b.a. (President of 

the Architectural Association) 
Benjamin Kidd, Esq. 
Professor Alfred Marshall 



9 

C. A. McCurdy, Esq., m.p. 
Eden Phillpotts, Esq. 

E. G. Pretyman, Esq., m.p. 

J. W. Robertson - Scott, Esq. (" Home 

Counties ") 
Leonard Stokes, Esq., f.r.i.b.a. (President of 

the Royal Institute of British Architects) 
J. St. Loe Strachey, Esq. 
Alderman William Thompson (Chairman of 

the National Town Planning and Housing 

Council) 
J. C. Thresh, Esq., m.d. (Medical Officer of 

Health for the County of Essex) 
J. Tudor Walters, Esq., m.p. 
H. G. Wells, Esq. 

F. Whitmore, Esq. (Architect to the Essex 
County Council) 

T. McKinnon Wood, Esq., m.p. 



JUDGES : 

Charles Allom, Esq. 
Walter Cave, Esq., f.r.i.b.a. 
Max Clarke, Esq., f.r.i.b.a. 
Guy Dawber, Esq. (Vice-President 

of the Royal Institute of British 

Architects) 
E. W. Gimson, Esq. 
H. V. Lanchester, Esq., f.r.i.b.a. 
Mervyn Macartney, Esq., f.r.i.b.a. 
Halsey Ricardo, Esq., f.r.i.b.a. 




[reed pond walk 
A CHARACTERISTIC BIT IN THE EXHIBITION 




PREPARING COTTAGE GARDENS 



[REED pond walk 



Charles Spooner, Esq., 

F.R.I.B.A. 

Laurence Weaver, Esq., 

F.S.A. 

F. Whitmore, Esq. (Ar- 
chitect to the Essex 
County Council) 

HONORARY 
SECRETARY : 

Michael Bunnev, Esq.. 

A.R.I.B.A. 



IO 



THE ARCHITECTS 

WHO HAVE DESIGNED HOUSES IN THE EXHIBITION 
THE HOUSES ARE ALL ILLUSTRATED IN THESE 



PAGES by 

H. Baillie Scott 
Geoffrey Lucas, 



M 

T. Lreottrey .Lucas, f.r.i.b.a 

R. Bennett, a.r.i.b.a., and 

Wilson Bidwell 
A. E. Sawday, f.r.i.b.a., and 

T. T. Sawday, a.r.i.b.a. 
G. L. Pepler, f.s.i., and E. J. 

Allen, a.r.i.b.a. 
Forbes & Tate 
D. Bamford, a.r.i.b.a., and 

H. Aitken 
R. L. Wall, a.r.i.b.a. 
Cecil A. Sharp, a.r.i.b.a. 
R. Annan 
Hugh T. Morgan 
T. E. Legg 
T. Millwood Wilson, 

LIC. R.I.B.A. 

W. W. Scott-Moncrierf and 
T. F. W. Grant, a.r.i.b.a. 



SKETCHES, 

R. T. Longden 
E. G. Theakston, lic. r.i.b.a 
Buckland & Farmer 
J. H. Curry, a.r.i.b.a. 
H. A. Welch, a.r.i.b.a. 
A. P. Starkey 
Harold Kennard, 
and Frank Cox 
A. L. Favell 
A. Lewin 
Hastwell Grayson, 

A.R.I.B.A. 

Percy B. Houfton 

E. R. Danford, a.r.i.b.a 

A. Reynolds Chard 

Frank Osier, a.r.i.b.a. 

T. Gordon Jackson 

S. E. Tarrant 

P. Cart de Lafontaine 



PLANS and PHOTOGRAPHS 



Keith D. Young, f.r.i.b.a. 
and Henry Hall, f.r.i.b.a. 

T. Gerard Davidson 

Spencer Murch, a.r.i.b.a. 

G. Berkeley Wills, a.r.i.b.a. 

C. H. Hignett, lic. r.i.b.a. 
a.r.i.b.a., J. Douglas Mathews, f.r.i.b.a. 
f.s.i., and H. Edmund 
Mathews, f.r.i.b.a. 

W. Curtis Green, f.r.i.b.a. 

William Stewart, f.r.i.b.a. 

T. D'Oyly Bulkeley 

John W. Fair and Val Myer, 

A.R.I.B.A. 

Septimus Warwick, a.r.i.b.a., 
and Herbert A. Hall, 

A.R.I.B.A. 

Charles S. Spooner, f.r.i.b.a., 
and S. B. K. Caulfield, 

F.R.I.B.A. 



M.A. 




BY MICHAEL BUNNEY AND C. C, MAKINS. NOT FOR COMPETITION] 

REAL OAK TIMBER IN REAL COTTAGES, HEATH DRIVE 



1 1 




ONE OF THE MANY HOUSES ADJOINING THE WIDE EXPANSE OF GOLF COURSE 



[heath drive 



anc 



Burgess & Myers 
Joseph Seddon, a.r.i.b.a. 
Mauchlen & Weightman 
Jones, Phillips & Whitby 

F. Endell Rosser 
C. M. Crickmer 
T. R. Bridson, m.a. 
M. S. Briggs, a.r.i.b.a. 

C. H. Rose, A.R.I.B.A. 
Edwin Gunn, a.r.i.b.a. 
Gripper & Stevenson 
Newton & Youngman, 

LIC. R.I.B.A. 

T. E. Eccles, f.r.i.b.a. 
C. H. Rose, A.R.I.B.A. 
Arthur H. Moore, a.r.i.b.a. 
H. T. B. Spencer, a.r.i.b.a. 

G. H. Barrowclirf, a.m.i.c.e. 
and E. T. Allcock, a.r.i.b.a. 

Ernest Willmott, f.r.i.b.a. 
L. F. Crane 

Edgar Bunce, a.r.i.b.a. 
H. S. East, a.r.i.b.a. 

W. G. ROSS, A.R.I.B.A. 

Norman W. Hick 

J. Myrtle Smith, a.r.i.b.a. 

Frank Nicholls 

S. P. Schooling 

A. F. C. Bentley 



May & Perrin 
T. Tyrwhitt, a.r.i.b.a. 
Norman Jewson, b.a. 
E. J. Mager, a.r.i.b.a. 
E. J. May, f.r.i.b.a. 
E. Turner Powell, f.r.i.b.a. 
Michael Bunney, a.r.i.b.a., 
and C. C. Makins, a.r.i.b.a. 
C. Quaife May 
Alfred Cox, f.r.i.b.a. 
Philip Tilden 
Barry Parker and Raymond Theodore Gregg 



Frank Foster, a.r.i.b.a. 

E. Smith Coldwell, a.r.i.b.a. 

A. Randall Wells 

Fyvie & Wilson 

C. Williams-Ellis 

Ronald P. Jones, m.a., 

LIC. R.I.B.A. 

Van t Hoff & Maxwell 

C. R. Ashbee, m.a., f.r.i.b.a. 

Johnson & Boddy 



Unwin, f.r.i.b.a. 
Harry E. Rider, m.s.a. 
C. W. Yates 



Frank Sherrin 
Gale & Hobbs 
Robert F. Hodges, a.r.i.b.a. 




ANOTHER PEEP AT THE EXHIBITION 
For Alphabetical List of Architects with numbers of their houses, see page 60. 



[parkway 



12 




A REVIVAL IN HEATH DRIVE 



A BRIEF ACCOUNT 
OF THE EXHIBITION 



From Edward* The building of the Exhibition Station 
Confessor to at Gidea Park by the Great Eastern 
George V. Railway opens up an almost forgotten 

corner of Essex, rich in historic tradi- 
tions and natural beauty. If there were no Exhibi- 
tion, Gidea Hall, its gardens and fishponds, and the great expanse of Gidea Park 
would be well worth seeing. 

The strange eventful history of the famous house and of its associations 
with our Sovereigns is told elsewhere in this Book. 

It was at the Palace of Havering — Gidea Park and Romford are within the 
Royal Liberty of Havering-atte-Bower — that the nightingales are said to have 
disturbed Edward the Confessor's devotions, and it was there, the tradition runs, 
that he received the Coronation ring which will presently be placed on the finger 
of George V. 

The Palace where so many monarchs lodged has crumbled, but the Roman 
road along which Charles and Elizabeth and all the other Tudors and Plantagenets 
journeyed still bounds the Park ; the woodland scenery, the pure country air 
remain unchanged ; and the nightingales still sing as in the Confessor's day. 
A Place Between the months of January and June a New Settlement has 

of Dreams, grown on the ancient site like a place of dreams. Where last year 
were meadows, to-day there are pleasant groups of houses and 
cottages, every house or cottage noteworthy 
as the realization of an architect's ideal. 

One hundred architects have been 
occupied each in designing and building 
the house or cottage which appealed to him, 
the best type of small dwelling which years 
of experience suggested and his skill enabled 
him to design. No client's fads or fancies 
have had to be reckoned with ; every 
architect has been free to put his own ideas 
into practice, to build for once, under the 
direction of his own fancy, the house or 
cottage of his imagination. 

Dreams The result is intensely, vividly 

Come True. interesting. Here is no show 
of plaster palaces or sham 
antiques. Here is an Exhibition of Dreams 
Come True, a collection of houses and cottages 



THE YEW PLANTED BY THE FAMOUS 
LANDSCAPE GARDENER, REPTON, WHOSE 
COTTAGE IS IN THE GARDEN SUBURB 




THE TREE IS ON THE MOVING 
APPARATUS READY FOR TRANS- 
PORTATION TO AN OPEN SITE 





BOTH HOUSES— 



—ARE IN PARKWAY 



13 

that will stand for the next hundred years as an 
example of what was good in domestic architec- 
ture and English homes when George V. was 
king. In six months a little Town has been 
created, a Town containing miles of roads, and one 
hundred and forty houses, each an expression of 
the best that its architect and builder could do. 
Size of the If a visitor allowed only ten 
Exhibition. minutes to inspect each or the 
Exhibition houses with all their 
varied points of interest, four days would not be sufficient to walk through them, and 
the old mansion house, its gardens, and the beauties of Gidea Park would remain 
to tempt a further visit. 

The Charm of One thing the Exhibition demonstrates is the infinite variety 
the Individual that will be possible in House building when skilful architects 
Home. are employed to build the new Town-planned Suburbs of 

London. There are to be seen at Gidea Park houses and 
cottages of every kind of external material — brickwork in greys, reds and soft 
purples — thin bricks such as were used by the builders of two centuries ago, 
soft sand-faced tiles that time will mellow, and lichen-tinted tiles that have 
been carefully preserved when some old cottage was pulled down. 

Here the cool grey of rough cast rises from a purple plinth, and there the 
architect has preferred the texture of brickwork limewhited. The colours and 
variety of the brickwork are endless, yet all is of a quiet tone that strikes no 
discordant note in the general picture. Here is timber framing such as the old 
Surrey builder loved, but it is honest timber work, not the sham of the nineteenth 
century. The gardens look as though they had been planted a year ago. Hedges 
of beech and hornbeam divide some of the houses ; between others a trellis fence 
supports a living screen of clematis and wild rose. 

It is all so thoroughly different from anything to be seen in an ordinary 
London Suburb, that there is no description but a Town of Dreams. 

The House from But it is not 
a Woman's point only the artis- 

of View. tic side of 

house - build- 
ing which is represented. The 
Exhibition is still more remark- 
able as showing how changed are 
the ideas of modern architects 
with regard to planning and 
fitting. The inconvenience and 
discomfort of the Victorian 
houses are gone. how trees were saved in meadway 





Here are a hundred new ideas that make for economy 
in upkeep, that save domestic labour, or lessen the need for 
repairs. The modern house must be pleasant to live in as 
well as pleasant to look at. Here are staircases without 
winders, on which a stair carpet can be easily laid and as easily 
moved, kitchens and sculleries where tiled surfaces make 
the accumulation of dirt impossible ; sinks, plate racks, 
draining boards, cupboards, cooking appliances, and gas 
heaters for water, all arranged for convenience as neatly 
and compactly as if the limited space were planned for the 
doorway in parkway tiny kitchen of a rich man's yacht ; tiled skirting boards that 

no broom can scratch ; tiled sills, where wet dishes or dirty 
saucepans will leave no mark ; cupboards that also serve as dinner hatches ; tiled 
bathrooms that catch the morning sun and slate-shelved larders that avoid it ; 
bedrooms planned to fit the furniture that must be accommodated ; cupboards 
that occupy usefully every bit of unused space — in a hundred ways a hundred 
architects have attempted to solve the problem of economy in upkeep and service 

The The Exhibition would not have been complete if some at least of the 

Furnished twentieth century houses had not been fitted with twentieth century 
House. furniture. Our furniture as well as our houses has been greatly 

improved in recent years. There are many completely 
furnished cottages and houses in the Exhibition, some furnished by the 
architect himself, some by firms whose names are a guarantee of excellence 
in construction and design. There are cottages in the furnishing of which the 
artistic charm of the eighteenth century has been re-created, and other houses 
where the furniture represents the last word of the twentieth century in 
simplicity and usefulness. 

No such interesting collection of modern cottage furniture has ever been 
brought together. 



The Cost 
of the 
Exhibition 



The Exhibition 
houses and cot- 
tages have cost 
£60,000 to build, 
and the lay out of the Exhibi- 
tion grounds and the necessary 
roads have cost a further 
£20,000. 

No charge whatever is made 
for admission. 




CLEARING UP IN MEADWAY 



The Catalogue of the Exhibition is sold at 1/-, and any profits derived from 
the sale will be paid to the King's College Hospital Removal Fund. 



2£Wj 



RMm 



o u 



!5ij r P.* ii i«' 



♦V- 1 * 



FT 



Dining Room in a Country Cottage by Heal & Son. 

FOR the furnishing in plain, though completely com- 
fortable, manner of the country cottage, Heal & Son 
have designed a delightful type of cottage furniture — simple 
without being in any degree mannered. Heal Cottage 
Furniture is essentially economical. 

For example, the pieces shown 
above in plain oak cost: — 



Dining Table, 2 ft. 6 ins. x 6 ft. 
Dresser, 4 ft. 6 ins. wide 
Rush-bottomed Chair ... 
Do. Armchair 

Bench, 6 ft. long ... 



£ s. d. 

2 10 

6 15 

12 6 

1 2 6 
1 5 



" Cottage Furniture " booklet 
sent free by post on request. 



HEAL &l SON 

TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD, W. 



By Special Appointment 
to His Majesty the King 



WHITELEY'S 

FURNITURE 

EMBODIES THR88 IMPORTANT CHARACTERISTICS 

QUALITY DESIGN PRICE 



NO other house in London offers such a selection of high- 
class Furniture at such low prices as Whiteleys. Every 
piece of Whiteley Furniture is built for long and strong wear. 
Every piece is upholstered for luxurious ease. And every piece, 
whether a reproduction of Period Furniture, or constructed on 
the principles of our best modern designers, is a standard of 

beauty and good taste. Many 
pieces, too, are exclusively our 
own design. And all carry 

WHITELEYS 

GUARANTEE OF 
SATISFACTION 

FURNISH OUT 
OF INCOME 

I Furniture and Goods in the Furnishing 
Departments may be purchased out of in- 
come if desired, on the most attractive 
MM BajMB£H£3 ! system of easy payments ever devised. 

All goods are supplied at the marked cash 
prices. A deposit of 10 per cent, is re- 
quired, and payment of the balance may 
be extended over one, two, or three years, 
according to the value of the goods se- 
lected. The only addition to the net 
cash price is interest at the rate of 5 per 
cent, per annum on the outstanding 

monthly balances. 

Illustrated Furnishing Catalogue of 152 pages 

Post Free. 



iBSsU 



WHITELEYS, QUEEN'S ROAD,W. 



HOUSES TO 
LIVE IN 



Will anyone, a hundred years hence, 
consent to live in the houses the 

Victorians built ? 

The New Machiavelh. 



i7 



WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOUR HOUSE 
AND HOW IT IS 
TO BE BETTERED 



"Tis very fine, 
But where d'ye sleep or where d'ye dine ? 
I find, by all you have been telling, 
That 'tis a house, but not a dwelling. 



With Contributions by Thomas Hardy, O.M., Alfred Russel 
Wallace, O.M., Sir Edward Poynter, P.R.A., Sir Frederick 
Treves, G.C.V.O., Sir Hiram Maxim, Sir Arthur Pinero, Mrs. 
Ayrton, M.I.E.E., Arnold Bennett, A. C. Benson, C.V.O., E. F. 
Benson, Miss Betham-Edwards, Hall Caine, Walter Crane, Mrs. 
Despard, Mrs. Fawcett, The Headmaster of Eton, " Home Coun- 
ties," W. W. Jacobs, J. K. Jerome, Benjamin Kidd, Mrs. John 
Lane, C. A. McCurdy, M.P., Eden Phillpotts, J. Tudor Walters, 
M.P., H. G. Wells, Israel Zangwill, and an Officer of Health. 

The following questions were addressed to a number of distinguished men and women ; 

i . What has struck you as the worst point about the average house .? 

2. What is the greatest improvement you have met with in building or fitting ? 

The replies are reproduced in the insets on this and the following pages. 



H 



OUSES were built to live in," wrote Francis Bacon, who knew Gidea Park 
well — his grandfather of Gidea Hall left " the greatest and meanest of 
mankind " ^20 by his will. Three centuries later the motto of Ibsen's 
"Master Builder," " Houses for people to live in" is the motto of those who, in 
this same Gidea Park, are responsible for a collection of houses so utterly unlike 
anything to be found in any other part of Outer London. On the House Problem 

is there wisdom to 
be got beyond 
that of "The 
Essayes of Francis 
Lord Verulam, 
Viscount St. 
A 1 b a n " ? — 
" Houses are built 
to Live in and not 
to L \e on: 
Therefore let Use 
bee preferred before 
Uniformitie ; Ex- 
cept where both may 
be had. Leave the 
Goodly Fabrickes oj 
Houses for Beau tie 
only to the En- 



THOMAS HARDY 
Prizeman ot the Royal Institute of British Architects, 1863 ; "Under the Greenwood Tree,"^i872 ; 
" Far from the Madding Crowd," 1874; " Tess of the D'Urbervilles," 1891; " Life's Little Ironies," 

1894 ; Order of Merit, 1910. 

/ , Hut ^vii ' ^pa^iZ^cJ^ 'tuL ^cri" $**l~ 

4 d.^^/w^/^^-^^ ***** 




THOMAS HARDY 




SIR EDWARD TOYNTER 




ARNOLD BENNETT 



chanted Pal laces of the 
Poets, who build them 
with small cost." 



SIR EDWARD POYNTER, P.R.A. 






^Xo^^J~(fh^-Z 



" Except where 

both may be had." 

Why should they not 

both be had ? Mr. 

Ernest Newton, the 

new Associate of the 

Royal Academy, has 

faithfully outlined 

the mental process by which most architects' houses take shape : 

First, we consider the aspect and the position of the various rooms in relation to that aspect ; then 
the contour of the land and what sort of shape will sit most comfortably on it ; we amass information 
as to local materials and methods, and if the site is very exposed we form very decided opinions as to 
the walls and roofs, and so gradually the house shapes itself. This is all common-sense and straight- 
forward so far, but I think we weaken a little when we come to the windows, and talk a little vaguely 
about " texture," " play of light and shade," " stiffening of the sash," " sense of protection in the 
room," and so on to justify our leaded panes or sash-bars. 

Some of the distinguished men and women to whom we are indebted for 
the accompanying post-cards and letters, will have it that the architects' 

ARNOLD BENNETT 
" Sacred and Profane Love," 1905 ; "The Old Wives' Tale," 1908 ; "How to Live on 24. Hours a Day," 1909 ; "What the Public 

Wants," 1909 ; " Clayhanger," 1910 ; "The Card," 191 1. 



English domestic architecture has immensely improved of late years, and is now far superior 
to that of any other country that I have visited. Nevertheless, I should suggest as regards the 
planning of the ordinary inexpensive house, that it might be improved by making one living-room 
definitely the most important feature of the house. In most houses the difference in size between 
the drawing-room and the dining-room is very small. This seems a waste of space, as during 
five-sixths of the day the dining-room is empty and useless. In the most modern French flats the 
dining-room is merely a section of the drawing-room, divided frcm the main part by a partition 
of woodwork and glass, which can be folded back after meals. By this arrangement the space 
occupied by the dining-room is utilised throughout the day. A bad modern tendency is to 
exaggerate the size of the hall. This raises false hopes, and lessens the apparent size of the rooms. 
The lare;e hall, which is quite unsuited to the English climate, and is in any case mediaeval, has 
become a fetish. In hundreds of "superior" suburban houses (rented at, say, ^100 a year) the 
hall, drawing-room and dining-room are all of about the same dimensions, which is ridiculous. 

In fitting, incomparably the greatest improvement that I have met with is the provision of 
hot and cold water and waste sink on every floor and in each bedroom. The great fault of nearly 
all modern fitting is still the barbaric fireplace method 
of heating. Also a certain amount of unnecessary 
cleaning might be avoided by more ingenious fitting. 
For example, in the matter of doorsteps. Ventilation 
is still primitive, and in winter is frequently impos- 
sible. Lastly, the sash window ought to be abolished, 
and the French window, with the addition of a 
separate ventilation pane across the top, substituted 
for it. England is the country in which rattling 
windows make night hideous. 




19 

ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE 

Architect, 1838-44 ; "Travels on the Amazon," 1853 ; Co-Discoverer with Darwin of the 

Darwinian Theory; "The Malay Archipelago," 1869; "Natural Selection," 1870; 

"Man's Place in the Universe," 1903 ; "My Life," 1905 ; "Is Mars Habitable?" 1907. 




" weakening " extends 
a little farther than 
leaded panes. Even 
Mr. Newton, whose 
words are quoted from 
an address delivered 
to a company of 
architects, made bold 
to say that he often 
thought that 

the average ordinary type 

of man who wants a plain, 

simple house, with fairly 

high, well - lighted rooms, 

carpeted floors, and all that 

goes to the making of a 

comfortable home from his 

point of view, is rather 

hardly used when he finds 

that instead of this he has to 

sit in a sort of low farmhouse 

kitchen, watching the smoke 

from a sulky log creeping up 

a cavernous chimney, his 

hard, uncushioned chair gritting on a rough stone floor. (I don't mean to say that we must never 

do this sort of thing. It is not perhaps the highest form of domestic architecture, but it is often 

quite pleasant and, 
within certain limits, 
legitimate.) What I 
mean is that we have 
no right to force it on 
an unwilling victim. 
More progress will be 
made by honest 
attempts to meet ac- 
tual requirements than 
in any other way, even 
if we sometimes have 
to do a little violence 
to our preconceived 
ideas. 

This is what the 
laity that has to 
live in the houses 
that are built has 
been feeling and 
saying on occasion 
for a long time. 
Alas, Mr. Newton 
can only " dimly 



H. G. WELLS 

'Anticipations," 1901 ; "Mankind in the Making," 1903 ; "A Modern Utopia," 1905 ; " Kipps,'' 
1905 ; "New Worlds for Old" 1908 ; "Tono Bungay," 1909 ; "Ann Veronica," 1909 ; "The 

New Machiavelli," 191O. 



CO 



4xA^£c^. 










ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE 




H. G. WELLS 



20 




SIR ARTHUR P1NER0 



MRS. FAWCETT 



SIR ARTHUR PI NERO 
"The Magistrate" ; "Dandy Dick" ; "Sweet Lavender" ; "The Second Mrs. Tanqueray " ; "The 
Notorious Mrs. Ebbsmith" ; " Trelawney of the Wells 



; " His House in Order ' 



"Mid Channel.' 



sts 






V 



/*T 









7*> 



s** 









3[ 









f*/±- fit* *> 



W- _ Xkff. 



imagine this 

straightforward, 

common - sense 

house," 

a house that is noise- 
less and d u s 1 1 e s s , 
whose windows of un- 
obstructed glass open 
and shut at a touch, 
where no floors creak 
or doors rattle, a house 
that is weatherproof 
and draughtless, but 
always well ventilated, 
cool in summer and 
warm in winter, econ- 
omical to build and 
keep in repair, and yet 
quite seemly and plea- 
sant ; I can imagine 
the possibility of such 

a house, and I suppose it is the house of the future, but we have got to shed a lot of preconceived 

ideas before it takes shape. 

MRS. HENRY FAWCETT, LL.D. 
President of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies 



\~ *■ 1*~ *. «. * a 






/ 



J"*e* 



J'tS.T-t « St^Apy 



^,Z~?<^. 




But it would 
seem that " pre- 
conceived ideas ,: 
have been shed at a 
satisfactory rate in 
the Gidea Park- 
houses. When 
their skilful archi- 
tects try their hands 
again in the build- 
ing of the rest of 
the Suburb, with 
the advantage to 
be derived from 
the accompanying 
holographs, we 
shall surely be very 
near the " house 
of the future " ! 

The outstanding 
fact in the plan- 
ning and fitting of 
houses, the layman 
feels, is that the 
exterior of the 



After consultation with my sister and another lady who has had a 
good deal of experience, I beg to answer your first question as follows : 

(a) Inattention to aspect ; the best rooms being planned to face 

road, whether N., S., E. or W., whereas a South aspect or 
S. with a point to East should always be secured where 
practicable, irrespective of all frontage to the road. Where 
a South aspect cannot be secured, the maximum of sun 
under circumstances should be aimed at. 

(b) Rooms, perhaps small in themselves, should be so arranged that 

they could be thrown together to make one large room. 
This is a great practical convenience. 

(c) Water supply should be arranged so that it can easily be 

entirely cut off" during frost to prevent damage by burst pipes. 

(d) The cupboard accommodation in most modern houses is very 

inadequate. 

(e) The architect often aims at what he considers a picturesque 

roof, involving a lot of work and expense in erection, and 
resulting in a very serious deterioration of the bedrooms 
under it. This should be checked. 

(f) Smaller baths than those usually supplied would suffice for 

every need. 

,o 



' c \Uc^u^c y^< t jfiu* °^ U V 








21 



'The Human Boy ' 



EDEN PHILLPOTTS 
'The American Prisoner" ; "The Secret Woman' 
of the Tenements" ; "The Beacon." 



" Tales 



(0 SafiLC^j .MC^c IraTUw u 

|tau 0^oi*4A^v-t <waia) Wou^e*, too (ittfe 

HRaX*.- «4-v«L. -XL^iy- Ca" Cc/WtoO* - 
(2) ^A^c^ueX*- uso^U^^^u)S 

UnJUt Wot- a coljJl vooX^ a lh*AM*/L 



structures and the decora- 
tive parts of the interiors, 
most important though 
these are, have sometimes 
more attention given to 
them than those factors 
in house design upon which 
comfort, easy working, and 
health depend. The 
grievance which house- 
holders nourish against 
some architects is not that 
they are artists, but that 
their art of building does 
not always extend, as a 
matter of course, to matters 
which, in a structure that 
is to be lived in, are as vital 
as its aesthetic qualities. 
The unspoken thought of 
many householders who are 
by no means Philistines is 
that the training of some 

architects does not seem to have been such as to enable them to bring to their 
planning and fitting, such skill, experience and ingenuity as are frequently dis- 
played in the equipment of say, modern engineering shops. 

Is there any reason why the daily work of those who have to pass most of 
their time in houses, should be done in conditions which are less favourable to 

economy of labour 
and general effici- 
ency than the con- 
ditions in the best 
factories ? If men 
had to do their 
day's work, not in 
offices or work- 
shops, but at home, 
they would have 
long since rebelled 
against the way 
in which so large 
a proportion of 
houses are de- 
signed and fitted. 



' Three Men in a Boat," 1899; " Passing of the Third Floor Back, " 1907; " They and I," 1909. 




f -* . • * * ■ 



^Le^*- 





EDEN PHILLPOTTS 




J. K. JEROME 



22 



HALL CAINE 



HALL CAINE 

Early contributor to "Builder" and "Building News"; "The Deemster,' 

1887 ; "The Eternal City," 1897 ; "The Eternal Question," 1910. 




Look round the office of a modern business man, count his labour-saving 
appliances and the dozen and one methods in which a maximum of work is got 
with a minimum of time and effort, and then — look critically round an average 
kitchen ! 

We cannot all live in the Suburbs, and some credit has been taken from the 
way in which flats are now built. But how many piles of flats have a furnace in 
the basement, a furnace to send absolutely unlimited supplies of absolutely boiling 

water into every room but 
the reception rooms ! 

The heating should be got, 
of course, from the waste of 
the flats if the heating system 
were planned with brains. 

Even in expensive parts of 
Hampstead, where some of 
the prettiest and most com- 
fortable, and certainly some 
of the most healthy houses in 
London are to be found, there 
is a state of things which 
cannot be called anything else 
than disgraceful. You will 
see these houses turn out four 
or five, or even half-a-dozen, 
bins of refuse, containing all 
sorts of filth and horror. The 
exposure of these bins is one 
of the scandals of London 
Civilisation. In the Ideal 
Flat it would be a strict rule 
that everything that is to be 
thrown away must be burnt 
if it is physically possible to 
burn it. That is to say, there 
would be an iron regulation 
that refuse must be sent down 
to the cellar in bins (with 
screw-down lids) or in chutes, 
and at least twice a day. In 
the cellar these receptacles 
would be emptied into the 
furnace. Already it is possible 
to buy a small boiler, the 
furnace of which will burn all 



The chief fault I find with the average English house 
is that there is not enough light in it. I remember that 
in my early days in London William Morris (who 
designed, I think, his own beautiful, but rather dark, 
house at Bexley Heath) used to say : " Your English 
architects make your windows big, and then your 
English people cover them with curtains." But with 
all respect to a great authority, I would say that that 
is precisely the right thing to do. Make your windows 
as large as possible, and then, if the light is sometimes 
too much, let it be modified from w thin. In our grey 
England we need all the sunhine we can get. There- 
fore I should say, " Light, m ire light," and remind you 
of a very significant Biblical passage which tells us that 
in the midst of many plagues the Israelites escaped 
contagion because they bad " light in their houses." 
The greatest improvement I can suggest in the planning 
of dwelling houses is that the windows of the bedrooms 
should, as nearly as possible, reach to the ceilings, and 
be fitted with the best appliances for the escape of the 
used-up air. I am also in favour of double sashes, as in 
the houses of the Engadine and other places, and would 
say, in general, let your bedroom face towards the 
morning sun. I have, as you see, confined my com- 
ments to the windows, because I regard them as a 
feature of the first importance to the health and spirits 
of the occupants of a house. But speaking for myself 
alone, I may add that I am so entirely under the in- 
fluence of my surroundings that if a room has not 
something of the mysterious and indescribable quality 
we call "atmosphere " in its form and character, I find 
I cannot live in it long without some loss either of 
bodily or mental vigour. Architects are as important 
as doctors to the health of a nation. 



kinds of house- 
hold refuse, and 
by the combus- 
tion of it send 
hot water 
through the 
house. With 
such a boiler 
nothing goes 
into the bins 
but tins, and 
perfectly dry 
ashes. Every- 
thing else is 
shot into the 
little furnace. 



"From a College Window," 1906 



A. C BENSON, CV.O. 
"Correspondence of. Queen Victoria' 



2 3 



(with Viscount Esher), 1907. 



to kza*uA~# kit J^^^r 

that ** fy, Y/>-*~™, *~> 










Inconsequence, 

the ashes which, with the tins, are the only refuse from the house, leave it abso- 
lutely dry. The dust-bins of such a house are the only clean ones in the street ! 
All that is asked by the intelligent housewife who has learnt a little science 
at school and reads the papers, and has relatives or friends out of England, is that 
as much common-sense shall be put into the building of a dwelling as into the 
planning of a factory. While she would not exchange her house for a Conti- 
nental or an American one, she feels that there are many labour-saving devices in 
use abroad of which she ought to have the advantage. She believes that her 
servants and herself are not allowed to avai themselves of the resources of civili- 
sation to the same degree as her husband and his staff benefit by them. Are our 

houses built to econo- 
mise heat ? Are they 
planned, like work- 
shops, to economise 



E. F. BENSON 
"Dodo," 1893; " The Angel of Pain," 1906; "The Osbornes," 19.0. 



<Xj\cuJi- 






\lcb 



JU.- 



H 



I. 






1 ' U— Cu&jl l±**-<- 



-f 




^MSZH\a> 



power ? 

The hot pipes from 
the cellar of the Ideal 
Flat would go every- 
where, warming the 
whole edifice as they 
did so, and fires would 
only be thought of in 
very severe weather, 
and for the look of the 
thing. 

Just think of the 
efficiency of a house 



A. C. LENSON 




E. F. BENSON 




MRS. AYRTON 




MISS BKTHAM-EDWARDS 




MRS. DF.SPARO 




2 4 



MRS. AYRTON 

The only Woman Member of the Institute ot 

Electrical Engineers. 



MISS BETHAM- 

EDWARDS 

Author of " Home Life 

in France," Officier de 

lTnstruction Publique de 

France. 



MRS. DESPARD 

President of the Women's Freedom 

League. 



1. Wood is never properly 
seasoned ; sinks are always too 
low ; not nearly enough cup- 
boards ; shelves and hooks in 
cupboards always too high. 

2. Teale back and other fireplaces 
give out much more heat 
than old-fashioned ones. In a 
country house all waste water 
running into a tank about 
8 inches higher than ground, 
so that it can be drawn off 
daily and used for garden. 



(1) Inadequate 
prevention of 
noise — pianos, 
children, dogs, 
etc. — and 
smells of cook- 
ing, etc. 

(2) The dimi- 
nution of stair- 
cas s and the 
absence of un- 
derground or 
half under- 
ground rooms 
and attics. 



Improvements I would suggest 
are : 

(a) Especially in towns — no cor- 
ners, rounding of all angles. 

(/;) Such shelf and cupboard space 
as will make the heavier furni- 
ture unnecessary. 

(<r) Windows much lower than is 
usual, with broad window seats. 

(d) Communication by small lifts 
between coal receptacles and 
upstair rooms. 



ISRAEL ZANGWILL 



where there was perfectly boiling water, in unlimited quantities, everywhere, at 
any moment, day or night ! Think of the things that could be done in a house 
where there was always boiling water without trouble, and plenty of it ! 
Heating water in tuppence ha'porths in kettles is surely a relic of barbarism. 
The principal defects in the modern house are : 

It is not really damp-proof. 

It harbours unnecessary dirt. 

It wants no end of repairs. 
Architects have grown in grace sufficiently to take engineers into consultation : 
how would it be if they were forbidden to have offices at all, and were under a 
penalty to do their work at home, with an eye kept on them by their mothers 
and wives, their single and married sisters, and their c'x-cooks and e'Ar-housemaids ? 
— for how can girls of intelligence be expected to remain servants when they have 
so much to complain of in the planning and equipment of their workshops ? 

As to servants' quarters in flats, surely they should be quite specially 
cheerful to compensate for the impossibility of chats at the back door ! But are 
they ? Why are flats, with the exception of the extremely expensive ones with 
servants' halls, so 
generally a failure ? 
Undoubtedly be- 
cause middle-class 
people cannot in- 
duce servants to 
stay in flats where 
there is nothing 
cheerful for them. 

As for small 
houses, not flats, 



J 



ISRAEL ZANGWILL 

'Children of the Ghetto," 1892 ; "Blind Children," 1903 ; "Italian Fantasies," 1910. 



/£*-</ 



25 



the architect, 
when he led 
the Victorian 
out of his 
snug, if stuffy, 
oppressively 
chandeliered, 
foully car- 
peted, preten- 
t i o u s, ugly 
House-of-the- 
Unending- 
Staircases- 
and-Consump- 
tive - Servant - 
maids, too fre- 
quently in- 
sisted on con- 
ducting him, 
as Mr. New- 

on says, into a Simplicity which, however hygienic and picturesque, often made 
more instead of less work for servants, and was not seldom lacking in the essentials 
of comfort. Because our own generation no longer writes stanzas, as Cowper 
did, to " The Sofa," that is not to say that it never wants to rest its back. 

A very large proportion of the small house planning of recent years has been 
done on the assumption that if people do not want a large house they necessarily 
want a cottage. Cottages will never be anything else than unsatisfactory when 



"HOME COUNTIES" (J. W. ROBERTSON SCOTT) 
Author of "Country Cottages," the "Townsman's Farm," and Various Books on Rural Subjects. 

My Cottage "book is mere male assurance. 
Surely, the Basic Pact is that Structures, 
which are to "be lived in most of the time "by 

Women . and are to be wholly worked by Women « 
are planned by MM, chiefly "single men in 
barracks" of offices? 

Illustration of an out-o r -work-arc hit ect- 
turned-cook peering into an oven placed in a 

suitable position for the use of the "weaker 

V 



sex" 



&kg^h^- ffoco^e foc^^tzi^ . 




HOME COUNTIES 



C. A. McCURDY, M.P. 



The greatest economy that could be introduced in housebuilding would be the flat concrete 
roof covered with asphalt and used as a roof garden. The wood and slate or tile roof is 
responsible for most of the repair bills in a well-built modern house. 

Coal should be banished from every well-conducted home and also gas. They are both dirt 
producers. In the future we shall use our old gas pipes to supply petrol for heating stoves ; in the 
meantime the Stores should supply briquettes of compressed fuel or coalite, each wrapped in clean 
paper ready to deposit on the fire. 

The horrible dust bin should be replaced by a refuse destructor in the scullery, which would 
heat the hot water system in winter and summer alike, and never require to be relighted. If the 
gas pipes are not lequired tor a petrol supply, they might be connected with a vacuum plant in 
the scullery, and used to take all dirt and dust from the other rooms in the house. A service lift 
from the top to the bottom of every house should be 
insisted upon by the Housemaids' Trades Union, as 
also fixed lavatory fittings in every floor. The 
exterior of the house should be freed from all wood- 
work, which is liable to decay and involve unnecessary 
expense in repainting. 



^< ^X *-*.' fa ^ 




C. A. MCCURDY 



26 



they are built for 
people who are 
not, and never 
will be, cottagers. 
A small house is a 
dwelling for a 
small family. A 
cottage is a class of 
dwelling peculiar 
to itself, which is 
planned from its 
foundations for 
people who have 
no need of ser- 
vants; and no 
amount of cob- 
bling will ever 
make a cottage a 
convenient place 
in which to keep 
servants. 

There are 
thousands of 
perfectly sane, 
decent and alto- 
gether valuable 
citizens who 
abominate the 
idea of living in 
a cottage. Why 
they should be 
forced into one 
against their will 
it is hard to say. 
Country life is 
only for the elect 
among towns- 
people ! Few are 
called to it. Still 
fewer are suffi- 
cient for it. 
There is a large 
stream of people 
leaving Town for 



L. M. in " The Westminster Gazette " 



Why cannot a small lift be planned, a lift that would hold a coal- 
scuttle or the nursery dinner things ? 

And need so many things go up or down stairs at all ? For example, 
the coals. I know an open grate is an ornamental and beautiful thing. 
But it might surely be confined to an ornamental room, and (perhaps) 
to the nursery. All other bedrooms, where heat is only wanted for 
short periods, might be warmed with electricity, and the great minds 
that evolved " hot water upstairs " might surely have carried that 
idea to its logical conclusion and laid on hot water in every bedroom. 

I think I hear someone cry " How hideous ! " Here I confess to a 
quarrel with much contemporary artistic furnishing. Instead of recog- 
nising contemporary needs, and considering how to reduce to their 
beautiful elements the instruments that serve those needs, artists lament 
the hideousness of modern life. 

There were other factors present in the ages of lovely furniture that 
were not so lovely. The brothers Adam displayed a lofty indifference 
to the question of sleeping accommodation for the quantities of servants 
their great houses required. Queen Anne herself lost eighteen children 
before they were ten years old, probably quite needlessly. And typhus 
and smallpox and cholera and even leprosy were not unheard of in the 
time of Chippendale and Josiah Wedgwood. 

It is all very well for a rich woman to laud the beauties of the basket 
grate and priceless bedroom china. It is possible that her housemaid, 
who has to blacklead the one and empty the slops from the other, 
would take a different view. 

It is not too much to say that there are hundreds of women who are 
being overworked into premature old age and bad health by needless, 
futile housework. We laugh sometimes at the narrowness of outlook 
of the suburban woman. How much cultivation and learning should 
we have acquired had we her daily task ? 

May I describe what would seem to be a properly equipped house 
under modern conditions, taking advantage of all contemporary know- 
ledge, as the mediaeval or Elizabethan builders did in their day ? First, 
all its floors should be hard-polished, so that they could be swept and 
need not be scrubbed. It should have a lift to the top of the house 
and a house telephone on every floor. All the upstairs rooms should be 
heated by electricity (with a switch near the head of the bed), and have 
cold and hot water laid on. The kitchen should have a gas or electric 
cooker besides the big stove, and the kitchen sink should be funda- 
mentally reformed. At present it consists of two taps and a trough. 
It ought to have a plate-rack of iron tubing instead of wood, pierced 
with one set of holes for hot water to wash plates, and another set for 
hot air to dry them. There ought also to be an apparatus for washing 
cups and glasses, consisting of a perforated disc, which should spray 
hot water inside a glass or cup reversed on it and pressed down. 

How could Art more certainly extend the area of beauty in the world 
than by reducing the numbers of prematurely aged women and anaemic 
girls, or shortening the time spent in monotonous and uninteresting 
drudgery ? And Science will certainly be compelled in the future to 
pay some attention to this department of our needs if the race is to 
continue at all. The unsuitability of the ordinary house for a raised 
standard of comfort and the declining birth-rate are not wholly uncon- 
nected. 



2 7 



The Rev. Hon. E. LYTTELTON 
Headmaster of Eton 



BENJAMIN KIDD 

"Social Evolution" 189+ ; "The Principles of Western 

Civilization," 1902 



The chief feature of Mrs. Lyttelton's 
additions to our seaside cottage in Norfolk is 
the amount of open-air and semi-open-air 
rooms — adaptable either as bed or sitting- 
rooms — with sliding glass panels to suit the 
different winds on a windy North and East 
Coast. 

These have proved a great success. 



By far the greatest fault I have to find with 
the average English house is the great loss of 
>pace and loss of comfort caused by chimneys 
and fireplaces built into the rooms. An 
effort to make the fire bay as prominent a 
feature of the English houje as the window- 



bay 



r would be widely appiec 



iated. 



W. W. JACOBS 

"Many Cargoes," 1896 ; "The Lady of the Barge," 1902 ; "Siilors' Knots,' 



1909 







-il 



y 



the Country, but there is probably as considerable a stream of people coming 
back from the Country to the Town after a winter or two of mud, churlish 
neighbours, dark 
nights, no laundries 
and largely in- 
creased servant diffi- 
c u 1 1 i e s — in other 
words, all the 
natural troubles of 
the stranger in a 
strange land, which 
the Townsman in 
Arcady really is. 

For many, many 
thousands of per- 
fectly right-minded 
people the ideal 
place to live in 
will always be the 
Outer Suburbs of 
London. There 
they are not only 
within reach of 
their work and 
their friends, but 

are certain of enjoying their share of the amenities of civilisation. It is because 
the houses which are being built in the Romford Garden Suburb are not sham 
country cottages, but simply small houses in rural surroundings on the outskirts 

JOHN C FRENCH, M.D., Medical Officer of Health for the County of Essex 







1. Inefficient lighting and ventilation, and lack of cupboards. 

2. A house in which rooms, hall, passage, staircase were all well lighted, and rooms well ventilated 
(without draughts), with doors and fireplaces properly placed, and with plenty of cupboards in 
recesses. 




THE HEADMASTER OF ETON' 




BENJAMIN KIDD 




W. W. JACOBS 




DR. J. C. FRENCH. 



28 




WALTER CRANE 




MRS. LANE 




SIR HIRAM MAXIM 




The average house or cottage built speculatively for 
anybody, and in consequence not suiting everybody, is 
generally pretentious and commonplace also, and seldom 
has one really good room. I would much prefer one 
good living room to a squeezy dining and drawing- 
room, and would sacrifice much to a pleasant hall or 
house-place, and the abolition of a basement. 
The provision of a good living room as the chief room 
of the house or cottage, and a kitchen wing. I under- 
stand, however, that architects have difficulty in getting 
some clients to see the advantages of the newer (old 
style) planning. 




7 J&* 



Too few cupboards. 

2. 

Lifts. 



MRS. JOHN LANE 



The houses 


are a 


perfect 


triumph. 






I wish you 


every 


success 


in a very deserving enter- 


prise. 







SIR HIRAM MAXIM 






L^f 



of London, that the building of them is so much to be welcomed. Those who 
from a young housewife planned these charming 

colonies of little houses 
have succeeded in bring- 

S~JuZ> * « ^. in S the country to towns- 

people, and that seems to 
i^JL-. y g -*L. -u -* ~4- o v A — * * — ^wvC cl~&~C be the right and proper 

thing to do to meet the 
needs of those who have 
to consider the require- 
ments of a livelihood, of 
friendship, of intellectual 
improvement, and of edu- 
cation for their children. 
People who have a 
vocation for rural life 
and the means of follow- 
ing it, will make their 
fortunate way to the 
country, where I for one 
hope to live till I die. 
Others may remember with satisfaction that enterprising railways are steadily 
reducing the distance from London at which Garden Suburbs may be built, and 
will not rashly exchange the opportunity of living in them for an environment of 
which they really know next to nothing that matters very much. 




J. TUDOR WALTERS, M.P. 



It is not the building and planning of the suburban house that most need improvement. The 
improved environment which town-planning and the 
better lay-out of estates provide will effect the greatest 
change in the suburb of the future. 

A freer market for land, larger gardens and detached 
houses are more important than improved house-planning. 




2 9 



2 






•i y n Man,! ^.tJUt' ^-^- , 

raw v ™ 








This is the house that Jerry built. 

[Note. — Of course, it was ages and ages ago. No one builds such houses now. 

The L.C.C. is too clever.] 

This is the artist who made the plan of the house that Jerry built. 

[Note. — He was really the builder's 
foreman, but his hair was quite long.] 

This is the drawing-room, 

spick and span, 
Designed by the artist who 

made the plan 
Of the house that Jerry built. 

[Note. — As the Estate Agent remarked : 
the frieze alone is worth all the money.] 



These are the leaking drains-^that ran 
Under the drawing-room spick and span 
Designed by the artist who made the plan 
Of the house that Jerry built. 

[Note. — This was only discovered at the Coroner's Inquest.] 

This is the eye of the local San-itary Inspector in 

search of the man 
Who laid the leaking drains that ran under the 

drawing-room spick and span, 
Designed by the artist who made 
the plan 
Of the house that Jerry built. 

[Note. — It is very difficult for an inspector to see 
leaks in the drains when they are being laid. 
Builders are so untidy that the inspector 
may be blinded by the brick dust and 
particles of mortar. Sometimes in the bad 
old days the inspector got half-a-crown in 
his eye, and no one could see through that.] 
\{To be continued iniour next.) 





3° 




THE MOST DEPLORABLE 
SPECTACLE IN ENGLAND 

By SIR FREDERICK TREVES, 

Serjeant Surgeon to the King 



SIR FREDERICK TREVES. 



h4uh keu? i-Uue UMdu&ii&u, (U Ml $stu.6nd, QutUu. Su^tU'C. 

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cuuL emi. fruek fy faaActj'u turf* (JumitL Kt i&ieA. fj/lhi d'Ku'fyL Awfc 

a, (tvUUaa^ (faM fair* emu toj&u. /fa hom*h>€s£ dtA'tu'JLtu A 
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[pi wma-ww. Aa$£iUL0U . 



3i 

On the other hand it must be owned that no one of the fine arts has shown 
so marked a development in recent years as has architecture, and notably domestic 
architecture. This fact is made manifest at a hundred spots within twenty miles 
of London, where will be found villas and cottages of most charming and 
exquisite design. The present Exhibition, I gather, aims at applying this artistic 
advance not to the isolated house, but to an entire Suburb. 

I am loath to answer your question as to what are the chief faults I find in 
the planning or fitting of the average house, for I hold to the belief that no 
country in Europe can show at the present time more graciously designed houses 
(of recent erection) than does England. I would add that the faults to which I 
allude apply to the few and not to the many. 

i . In the first place there is sometimes to be seen in the modern villa or 
small house a straining after what is merely fantastic or quaint, and this is apt to 
lead to something further, to what is merely grotesque. It is only the original 
man who can be happily original, and when a designer without this quality 
attempts to produce something that shall be new, he is apt to approach to what 
is silly. This laboured effort to be original is very evident in modern French 
architecture of a certain type, and the same is illustrated by the preposterous 
villas and chalets to be found in almost every new suburb or recently developed 
pleasure resort of that usually artistic country. 

2. One occasionally sees features which are proper to the large house 
inconsistently thrust upon the small. The effect is the same as that produced 
when a small boy dresses himself up in his father's tall hat and great coat. By 
this process we get the villa with a turret, or even a battlement, the house of 
many gables, the cottage with an oriel window worthy of an ancient university, 
or a front door which would not belittle a town hall. 

3. Certain mannerisms are becoming unduly prominent. Two of these 
I personally hope will soon become unfashionable. I allude to the ridiculous 
ingle nook in which no one ever sits, and the green rain-water butt which 
harbours mosquitoes and has other sanitary defects. 

4. One occasionally sees a medley of building material employed in the 
construction of single houses. In one such house of samples I noticed bath 
stone, red brick, tile hanging, half timber work and rough cast. This is surely 
undesirable, as is also imitation building material illustrated by plaster so treated 
and painted as to imitate half timber work. The production of such mimicry 
would not deceive a child of six, and would spoil any house however well 
designed. Unnecessary prominence is apt to be given to certain sanitary details 
of a house. I allude especially to the upper water closet drain and ventilating 
pipe. These structures and others of like kind may be made so conspicuous as 
to form a striking feature in the elevation. I have seen a ventilating pipe carried 
across the middle of a beautiful roof of Swanage slabs which it spoilt utterly. 



3 2 

5. With regard to the internal planning of a house, there is at times an 
insufficient regard for arrangements which are labour saving, and which are of 
vital importance to the housewife in the cottage, and the mistress of the house 
with a limited number of servants. 

In the fittings also certain of the labour-saving contrivances which are to be 
seen in American houses may, with advantage, be adopted. 

It should be realised too, that the standard of comfort expected — and 
reasonably expected — by the domestic servants of the present day is not always 
regarded as it should be. 

A great fault in many small houses is the staircase, which is often narrow, 
angular and exceedingly inconvenient. Indeed, it seems to me, as a layman, 
that the proper disposal of the staircase is one of the most difficult problems the 
architect has to face in the designing of a cottage or small countrv house. 

Rooms — especially small bedrooms — are apt to be planned without regard 
to the question of the disposal therein of the necessary furniture. The partitions 
between rooms are so inefficient that every word uttered in one room can be 
heard in the next. The same unpleasant sound-conducting properties often 
attach to the open beam ceiling which is much affected by many. Often the 
worst feature of the small and cheap house is the bad carpentry, due possibly to 
the use of unsuitable or imperfectly seasoned wood. 

6. Two common faults require special attention. Not the least important is 
the neglect of any attempt to make the house vermin proof in the sense of being 
rat proof. The gravity of this neglect, from a health point of view, is now 
receiving prominent attention. 

The ventilation of cottage bedrooms is often totally neglected. This especially 
applies to the room with the long, low casement window which is so much 
admired. The cubic contents of such a room may satisfy the standard, but the 
amount of pure circulating air is dangerously below the need. 



Imrpu/tfci/ 



^^JkdtiUeASTTuie* . 



RUISLIP MANOR 



LIMITED. 



Town Planning Scheme for Estates of King's College, 
Cambridge, at NORTHWOOD & RUISLIP, Middlesex. 



THIS Estate comprises 1,300 acres of land in the heart 
of the most beautiful country, including two large woods, 
the highest point being 300 feet above sea level. 

Northwood Golf Course and the lake known as Ruislip 
Reservoir adjoin the two woods. 

It is served by five railway stations, which can be reached 
in from 18 to 33 minutes from Paddington, Marylebone, 
Baker Street, and other West End stations. 

The planning of the Estate has been the subject ot a 
competition, for which 62 architects submitted designs, and 
for which Sir Aston Webb and Mr. Raymond Unwin acted as 

assessors. 

Land will be sold freehold, either in bulk or in plots, in 
conformity with the Town Planning Scheme, or can be let on 
Building Agreement. 

Houses will be erected at all rentals up to £200 per annum. 

Special arrangements can be made for erecting on the Estate 
most of the exhibition houses now erected at Gidea Park. 

Architects, Builders, Investors and Householders desiring 
land or houses, and requiring further information, can obtain 
it at the Offices of the Company, 3 3 Henrietta Street, Bedford 
Street, Strand, W.C. 



in 




By Appointment 



SHOOLBRED'S 

FURNITURE 
DECORATIONS • CARPETS 

and everything requisite for the complete Furnishing of Houses 
of any size and style, tastefully, and with every comfort. 

FULLY ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE SENT (free) ON APPLICATION 




The " interior" illustrated is one of a great number of Specimen Rooms arranged in Tottenham House for the 
help of Customers when Furnishing, Decorating, or re-arranging their Houses . It is a well appointed, practical, 
Dining Room designed for a moderately sized House, or large Cottage, and can be inexpensively carried out. 

TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD 
LONDON • W. 



IV 



THE 



HISTORIC SITE 



OF THE 



EXHIBITION 



34 



HENRY IV 



HENRY VIII 



CHARLES I 




Edward the Confessor holding the 
Coronation Ring jrom which Have- 
ring takes its name, and John, who 
lojed hunting there. 



THE ROYAL LIBERTY OF 
HAVERING ATTE BOWER 

THERE is no part of England richer in historical 
associations than the Ancient and Royal Liberty of 
Havering-atte-Bower in the County of Essex, of 
which Gidea Park and the Town of Romford form part. 
f/ In the Royal Palace of Havering Kings of England kept 
their Courts from the days of the Saxons until the Com- 
monwealth. "Had not the star of Royal favour and 
fashion set westward, Havering might have been," as has 
been well said, " what Windsor is now." " The preserva- 
tion of the Liberty's rights," one reads, " seems to have 
been the constant care of kings from about 1400 to 
1676." There is a series of charters from Henry IV. 
onwards. 

The old tale is that Havering was so named because 
the ring of St. John — declared by tradition to be the same 
George V. will presently receive at his Coronation — was 
there delivered to Edward the Confessor. The legend is 
a common subject of mediaeval art. It was at Havering 
that that^saintly ruler craved that the nightingales of the 
place might not be allowed to disturb him at his 
devotions ! Only a pious chronicler has asserted that 




STOCKS AND PILLORY AT 
HAVERING- ATTE -BOWER 



35 
since that time " never has nightingale been heard to sing as in 
other places." 

Close to Gidea Park, at Pyrgo, stood another Royal Palace, 
which was used as a dower house for the Queens of England. 

In no part of the ancient Liberty has time wrought less 
change than in the 450 acres of woodland scenery known as 
Gidea Park. The eventful history of the mansion house is told 
elsewhere in these pages, but the wooded expanse around is 
little altered since the days when Plantagenets, Tudors and 
Stuarts journeved along the Roman road which still bounds the 
Park. 

The Tudors were as fond of Havering as the Plantagenets. Henry VIII., like John T 
was often hunting there, and Elizabeth visited it at least five times. On the next page 
is a plan of the old Palace by Lord Burleigh which is preserved in the British Museum. 
Samuel Fox, who was the son of the martyrologist, was the keeper of the Palace, and 
he thus describes two of its chambers : 

The Presence Chamber ; five boultes and rings and four double lockes ; the wyndowes glazed, 
only one casement blovven and broken in of the wynd ; two long tables with tressells and 
formes. 

The Privy Chamber, and the Queen's Bed Chamber, matted ] and glazed. 

It was upon one occasion when Elizabeth was holding her Court at Havering 
that Lord Burleigh was asked 
for hints as to the presenta- 
copy of the New Testament in 
must have regard," wrote the 
book have no savour of spike, 
to make their books savour well, 
a strong scent." 

The last monarch to stay in the. 
during the visit of his mother-in- 
Hall. During the Commonwealth 
of for some £9,000. The purchaser 
the son of one of the men who had 
be drawn several years in succession 



FOUND NEAR 
GIDEA HALL 




THE ROMAN POST 
OF DUROLITUM 



by the University of Cambridge 
tion of an elaborately bound 
Greek to her Majesty. " They 
Lord High Treasurer, " that the 
which bookbinders do seek to add 
for her Majesty cannot abide such 

Palace of Havering was Charles I., 
law, Marie de Medecis, to Gidea 
the Crown possessions were disposed 
of the'larger part of the estates was 
condemned Charles, and lived to 
on a hurdle for what he had done. 

was once more taken possession of 
Palace — part of it was described 



After the Restoration Havering 
by the Crown, but the tumble-down 

as " a confused heape, old ruinous, ^TPx, ?,??^^^ decayed" —had been demolished 
by its Cromwellian possessor. The garden suburb Royal Manor was in the hands of 
various notabilities until, shortly before the accession of Queen 

Victoria, it was sold by public auction. The purchaser acquired manorial jurisdiction 
over 16,000 acres of country, and all the ancient rights of appointing magistrates, and 
giving freedom from tolls, which were only abolished in 1896. 

" Since the destruction of the royal palace, many of the venerable mansions of the 

Liberty of Havering-atte-Bower have passed away," we read in the History of Essex. 

' They are dwindled into farmhouses, with broad gravel roads in place of the drawbridges 



The only act of Jane Seymour's life as wife of Henry VIII., of which a record has been preserved, is an order of hers to the 
park-keeper at Ha-uering-atte-Boiver " to deliver to her well-bebved the gentleman of her sovereign lord and king's chapel royal, two bucks 
of high season." 



36 



L 







which formerly led to 
them, and in some cases 
the military moat narrow- 
ed to a horse pond " in 
which 

Cows may cool and geese 
may swim. 

But the Liberty of Haver- 
ing-atte-Bower — it is still 
so written and pronounced 
— is a district in which it 
is easy for those whose 
day is spent in London to 

Forget the snorting^steam and piston stroke. 
" The wooded and parked heights north of 
Romford," as Mr. Hope Moncrieff writes, " are 
too often passed by in ignorance of their 
charms." Havering-atte-Bower — lying as was 
once written " among some of the prettiest 
scenery in Essex " — undoubtedly " conveys to 
us," as it did to Walpole, " the notion of a 
romantic scene." We may not omit to quote 
from Sir Walter Besant's All in a Garden Fair 
part of the novelist's description of the " glorious 
fragment " of Hainault Forest, not far from 
Gidea Hall : 

Besides the creatures and the trees and flowers, there is scenery, here and there hillsides clothed 
with wood ; slopes on which, as you stand upon them and look among the trees, the sun produces 
strange and wonderful effects ; stretches of elastic turf ; places where the forest seems to recede and 
still to recede as you walk along ; great trees, avenues of oaks, gatherings of beeches, with ash and 

elm and sycamore ; everywhere the underwood of hawthorn, 
honeysuckle, and wild rose ; everywhere the freshness and 
fragrance of the wild wood ; always light and colour, even 
in January, when the delicate purple bloom lies upon the 
masses of bush and shrub, and the late leaves linger on 
the sheltered branches, and always silence and rest from the 
talk of man. 

Lord O'Hagan, who lives at Pyrgo Park, Havering- 
atte-Bower, once declared that " there are few 
districts in England which afford, on the whole, more 
varied scenery than Essex," and this is particularly 
the case of the country lying within easy reach 
of the favoured residents of the Romford Garden 
Suburb. 



y- 



■v-fir./«J*»J^C3f- Mf^c *_• 



PART OF A MAP OF THE PALACE OF HAVERING- 
ATTE-BOWER MADE BY LORD BURLEIGH 



AN OLD ROMFORD MAP WITH AN 

ANTIQUARIAN FLAVOUR, IN THE 

POSSESSION OF MR. BAMFORD 



.'- 




.;r.i 




^-z,„ v . 


' ' N 









FROM HORNCHURCH PARISH REGISTER 
Pierce Tenante, Esq., servant to our late Sovereigne K. Edward 6, and Queen Mary, and also 

one of the Gentlemen Ushers in Ordinary the space of 32 years to our Sovereigne Lady Q. Eliz. 

He died in Nov., 1560, aged 70. 

Thomas Witherings, Esq., Chief Post-Master of Great Britaine and Foreign Parts, who died 

in"i65i. 



ROMFORD LONG YEARS AGO 



37 




SAMUEL PEPYS 



WILLIAM KEMP, THE ORIGINAL 
DOGBERRY, IN HIS "MORRIS 
DANCE " THROUGH ROMFORD 

SOME PERSONAGES 

ASSOCIATED WITH 

ROMFORD 




GEORGE FOX AS A YOUNG MAN 



ROMFORD itself has a history stretching back through many centuries. For example, 
Mawney's Road in Romford recalls the name of Sir Walter Manny's house 
in Romford — the Sir Walter Manny who urged Edward III. not to kill the six 
surrendered citizens of Calais. 

Said that distinguished knight to his liege : " Ah, noble king, for God's sake refrain 
your courage ! Ye have the name of sovereign noblesse ; therefore now do not a thing 
that should blemish your renown, nor give cause to some to speak of your villainy. Every 
man will say it is a great cruelty to put to death such honest persons, who by their 
own wills put themselves into your grace to save their company." Although it was 
Queen Eleanor who finally caused the monarch to desist from his purpose, we may 
believe, as Sir Edward Strachey has written in his " Morte d' Arthur," that " the noble life 
of Sir Walter Manny at the English Court must have done much to make both Edward 
and the Black Prince, as well as the rest of the princes and nobles, what they were as 
knights and gentlemen." Sir Walter founded a monastery, and in the charter, which 
may still be read, it is provided that prayers shall be said for the souls of those who 
had fallen by his hands. 

Here is a Romford story of old Stow's set forth in his characteristic way : 

Strait orders being taken for the suppression of rumours, divers persons were apprehended and executed 
by martial law, amongst the which the bailiff of Romford in Essex was one, a man very well beloved. 
He was, early in the morning of Mary Magdalene day (then kept holiday), brought by the sheriffs of 
London and the knight marshal to the well within Aldgate, there to be executed upon a gibbet set up 
that morning ; where, being on the ladder, he had words to this effect : " Good people, I am come hither 
to die, but know not for what offence, except for words by me spoken yesternight to Sir Stephen, curate 
and preacher of this parish, which were these : He asked me, ' What news in the country ? ' I answered, 
' Heavy news.' ' Why ? ' quoth he. ' It is said,' quoth I, ' that many men be up in Essex, but thanks 
be to God, all is in good quiet about us.' And this was all, as God be my judge," etc. Upon these 
words of the prisoner, Sir Stephen, to avoid reproach of the people, left the city, and was never heard 
of since to my knowledge. I heard the words of the prisoner, for he was executed upon the pavement 
of my door where I then kept house. 

"From Iiford by Moone-shine, I set forward, dauncing within a quarter of a myle of Romford, where, in the highwaye, two strong 
jades (having belike some great quarrell to me unknowne) wtre beating and byting either of other ; and s>uch through God's help was my 
good hap, that I escaped their hoofes, both being raysed with their fore feete over my head, like two Smithes over an Anvyle. So I rid to 
my Inne at Romford." — From "Kemp's Nine Dates' fVonder," giving an account of a Morris Dance from London to Norwich. 



38 

It was through Romford that, in 1599, William Kemp — who 
in the time of Shakespeare played Dogberry, young Gobbo, 
the gravedigger in " Hamlet," and Justice Shallow — danced 
the Morris Dance to Norwich, " Kemp's Nine Daies' Wonder." 
During the Civil War not only Cavalier troops but the " souldiers " 
of Fairfax entered the town. In 1592 Quarles, "the honest, 
inoffensive poet " of the " Emblems," was born at Romford ; a 

century later George Fox, 



CURIOUS BURIAL ENTRIES 

IN ROMFORD CHURCH 

REGISTER. 



1570 

1574 

1605 
1 610 

1612 
1618 

1620 
1625 

1626 

1630 
1656 

1698 

1712 

I 794 



-Thomas Browne, vocat 

Quacke Browne. 
-Robertus Cottonus — goonne 

powder. 
-Ould father Giles. 
-Ollyver, a prison r executed 

and buryed. 
-Dumb Joan fm Hare St. 
-A vagrant y r dyed in ye 

constables hand as he was 

going. 
-Ane Steward, an old mayd. 
-A woman whom they called 

madd megg. 
-Toby Asser, killed in a 

chimney. 
-Joan Quicke, an ancient mayd. 
-Two women that were 

Executed. 
-Richard Radley, a stranger, 

buried naked. 
-Eliz : How — nee virgo, nee 

flemina, nee vidua. 
-James Martin (a King's mes- 
senger) shot near the 

Stoup by 5 footpads. 



And what's a life ? The flourishing array 
Of the proud summer meadow, which to-day 
Wears her green piush, and is to-morrow hay. 

— Quarles. 




QUARLES, 1 HE POET OF 
THE "EMBLEMS," WHO 
WAS LORN AT ROMFORD 



theQuaker, describes in his 
•diary how he "abode all the 
winter" at his son Mead's 
house at Gooses or Goose- 
hays ; while in another 
famous diary, Pepys', we 
have some characteristic 
local references. 

In the eighteenth cen- 
tury Romford was a great 
coaching centre, but there were more notable 
scenes on the roadway than the passage of the 
Bury, Norwich, Chelmsford, and Maldon coaches. 
The place was vastly impressed by the cavalcade 
attending the bride of George III. on her way to 
London, and burned many torches in her Royal 
Highness's honour. It expressed its feelings in 
a different way, however, when the body of 
George IV. 's unhappy Queen Caroline was borne 
through its streets. Standing in the picturesque 
market square of Romford, so vividly represented 
in Mr. Wade's drawing, it is easy to imagine what 
the town looked like in the old days. The church 
house in the square was until lately the Cock 
and Bell Inn, itself formerly a chantry house, 
built in the reign of Henry VII. 

Romford has been, 



neither instituted nor inducted by 
responsible to New College, Oxford 
during the whole term 
Terry, to whose memories 



indeed, as has been 
written, " a town of dig- 
nity." It is not without 
interest to note that the 
vicar is practically inde- 
pendent of episcopal 
jurisdiction; he is 
a bishop, but is solely 
One vicar lived abroad 
of his appointment. Mr. George 
of old Romford every writer on 



matters within the Liberty of Havering-atte-Bower must 
be greatly indebted, says that on one occasion the bishop 
of the diocese, with a number of candidates for Confirma- 
tion standing [at the gates of the church, were unable to trees, 



E£lSfi|i ¥S»* 


. jc; 


' ^f^.'T5P| 


itSr" 


>'%,%:, """-/. 


||t^|yJ||£cr 








""'" " ' ' 









GIDEA PARK 



Reede's Almshouses in Romford were bequeathed in 148Z "to be a dwelling place for five poor men, not blasphemous, nor common 
'ggars, but such as have been of good governance and fallen into poverty, the saddest and wisest to be the ruler." 



39 




THE MARKET PLACE, ROMFORD, IN THE OLD DAYS 



get admittance be- 
cause the vicar, for 
some reason, had 
taken away the key! 
No account of 
Romford of the past 
would be complete 
without a reference 
to James Wilson, 
the fat butcher. 
The storv goes : 

He was very profi- 
cient in psalmody, and 
on a Sunday before the 
services commenced he 
was in the habit of en- 
tertaining himself and 
the congregation with 

singing psalms bv himself until the minister came into the desk. On the last fast day before his death 
he never quitted the church between the morning and evening services, but repeated the Lord's Prayer 
and sang psalms from pew to pew, until he had performed his devotions in every pew in the church. 
Y\ ilson was no less remarkable for the peripatetic way in which he took his meals. He would frequently 
take a shoulder of mutton in his hand, a lump of salt in the bend of the arm in which he carried the 
joint, and with a small loaf and a large knife would walk up and down the street until he had 
consumed the whole of his provisions. He was excellent at penmanship ; his meat bills were 
exquisitely penned, but as fantastical as thev were skilful. The top line perhaps would be in German 
text, the second Roman print. Beef would be in one hand, mutton in another, veal in another, lamb 
in another, and not two kinds of meat written in the same colour. Notwithstanding his singularity, 
James Wilson was much respected for his integrity and genuineness of manners. 
Here is another tale from " Memories of Old Romford " : 

At the time the " Rambler " came out in separate numbers, there was in Romford a club called 
the Bowling Green Club. The characters pourtrayed in the " Rambler," to wit Leviculus, the fortune- 
hunter ; Tetrica, the old maid ; Mrs. Busy, and others, so exactly fitted the members of this club, that 
they came to the conclusion there was a traitor among them. As the authorship could not be ascertained 
by an inquisition among the members, the publisher was written to, who informed his indignant 
interrogator that one Samuel Johnson was the author. The name of the curate at Romford was 
Samuel Johnson, and had he (their pastor) been guilty of such a libel ? In vain did the 
poor man protest his innocence. Samuel Johnson was the author, and who else could it be I To 

save himself from persecution, the curate 
rode off to London to learn the truth, and 
on his return he was able to assure the 
enraged wiseacres of the Bowling Green 
Club that there was another Samuel John- 
son in the world beside the curate at Rom- 
ford, and that it was he who had woven 
these caps, which they of their own account 
had put on. 




TWO SKETCHES IN HARE STREET, WHICH 
RUNS THROUGH THE GARDEN SUBURB, AND 
IS ONE OF THE MANY PLACES IN WHICH THE 
SHIFTY FATHEROFMARYWOLLSTONECRAFT, 
AUTHOR OF THE FAMOUS "VINDICATION 
OF THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN," AND MOTHER 
OF MRS. SHELLEY, LIVED WITH HIS FAMILY 




' Here lye John Outred and Jone his wyff 
Who liuyd long togeddyr withouten stryff. 
John left this world, an' passyed to heuen — 
On thousand t'yue hundred yere and eleuen." — Epitaph in Romford Churchyard. 




A STORY OF 
OLD ROMFORD 




THE HOUSE, IN ROMFORD 

MARKET PLACE, IN WHICH 

COLONEL BLOOD LAY 



BACK OF HOUSE, SHOWING 

OLD PASSAGE THROUGH 

WHICH PRETTY BESSEE 

PASSED 



IT is said that when " fair England's flower and pride," Simon de Montfort, fell at 
Evesham, his son Henry was left on the field, blinded but alive. He was succoured 
by a baron's daughter, who, it was believed, privily married him. The story goes 
that he was for safety's sake hidden away and known only by the appellation of " the 
silly blind beggar of Bethnal Green." According to the romantic tale, their fair 
daughter went off to seek her fortune, and 

She kept on her journey until it was day 
And went unto Rumford along the hyeway, 
Where at the Queene's Armes entertained was she, 
So fair and wel favoured was pretty Bessee. 

At Romford Bessie had suitors. But when it was discovered that she was only the 
daughter of " the blind beggar of Bethnal Green," none of them persevered but a 
young knight. They were married, and at the wedding the " blind beggar " appeared, 
disclosed his true name, and made known to the bridegroom that his spouse-to-be was 
none other than the granddaughter of the great popular hero and of the blood royal of 
England. 

The archway of the house, sketches of the back and front of which appear on this page, 
was part of the old Queen's Arms, where " pretty Bessee " was " entertained " and received 
her suitors. 

The fame of the venerable house adjoining the archway is due to the exploits of a 
character who is certainly not legendary. In this house the notorious Colonel Blood lay 
while he recovered from his wounds received in one of his most desperate exploits, the 
stirring story of which is told with such vigour by Sir Walter Scott in his Notes to 
Peveril of the Peak. " A daring, but a villainous unmerciful look " had Colonel Blood, 
writes Evelyn the diarist ; " a false countenance, but very well spoken and dangerously 
insinuating." Scott revels in the details of this desperado's attempt to seize Dublin 
Castle and its Governor, his taking of the royal crown out of the Tower, and his seizure 
of and attempt to hang the Duke of Ormond at Tyburn. His " exploits, whether the 
motive, the danger, or the character of the enterprises be considered, equal, or rather 
surpass," says the novelist, " those fictions of violence and peril which we love to peruse 

in romance." He " de- 
parted this life in a species 
of lethargy in 1680," Scott 
writes. Even when he was 
dead, people suspected a 




^V 



^flfcjim 



scans 



a a 






A 



ROMFORD MARKET PLACE, SHOWING THE FAMOUS HOUSE 



— f W*p~SV trick "preparatory to some 
%£n i MJlJl exploit," and a coroner had 
to have his body dug up 
and identified by " some 
of his acquaintances, who 
swore to the preternatural 
size of the thumb." 



41 



THE STRANGE, EVENTFUL HISTORY 

OF GIDEA HALL 




THREE ENGLISH SOVEREIGNS 

ASSOCIATED WITH GIDEA HALL 

LADY JANE GREY 

QUEEN ELIZABETH 

EDWARD VI. 



A MAN " of great boldnesse of speke, well spoken, singulerly wytted, and well 
reasoned," was Thomas Cooke, draper, of London, whom Jack Cade, when he 
camped on Blackheath in 1450, requested to collect cash and goods for him from 
the foreigners in the City. This Cooke, who had come from Suffolk, had made money, 
and he became not only Lord Mayor but Knight. He was a Yorkist, but he had married 



romantically the daughter 
had been a Knight of the 
1467 he set about building 
must be a very old word, 
ged, signifying pike, and ea, 
pike to be trolled for in the 

In those days, of course, 
charter before he could build 
embanked, machicholated, 
Gidea Hall of " stone and 
Thomas's charter, it is men- 
would be 200 acres in extent, 
wood. Alas! the great house 
century. Sir Thomas Cooke 
this is what happened to him 




H 



JACK. CADE AT LONDON STONE 



of a Lancastrian leader. He 
Bath two years, when in 
Geddy or Gidea Hall. Geddy 
and probably comes from 
for water. There are still 
waters at Gidea Hall. 

a subject had to have a 
a castle " turreted, moated, 
and battlemented," as this 
chalk " was to be. In Sir 
tioned that Gidea Park 
a score of the acres being 
was not to be finished for a 
was a very rich man, and 
on the evidence of a single 



witness : 

One, Hawkins, having requested the loan of a sum of money, he refused when he understood it was 
for the use of Margaret, Queen of King Henry VI. Hawkins being committed to the Tower, and put 
on the rack, mentioned this among other things which one would have thought could not then have 
been accounted criminal. However, Sir Thomas was committed to the Tower, and by means of Sir 
John Fogge, indicted for high treason. Whereupon Geddy Hall was plundered of the furniture and 
all that could be carried away ; the deer in his park, rabbits, fish, etc., destroyed. Though, by the 



4^ 

integrity of the Chief justice, Sir John Markham, he was acquitted, and found guilty of misprision, 
yet he was committed first to the Compter, and afterwards to the King's Bench prison, from which he 
could not be released without paying .£8,000 to the King and £800 to the Queen. The Chief Justice 
was also displaced. 

Warwick the King-maker and " false fleeting, perjured Clarence," who was to be drowned 
in the butt of Malmsey — according to popular belief — were among those who sat in judg- 
ment on Sir Thomas at his trial for high treason at Guildhall. 

Under Henry VI., Sir Thomas got no more justice than under Edward IV. When 
Edward IV. came back to his throne, the knight, who had tried to get away to France, 
was captured by a Flan- 
over to his sovereign. 
Thomas were again 
icier, " and his wife put 
be kept at the Mayor's." 
Thomas had suffered was 
tors, for did not the 
a speech in the City 
against Edward with the 

What Cooke, your own 



GIDEA HALL, AS COMPLETED BY 
ANTHONY COOKE AND VISITED 
CHARLES I 



SIR 
BY 



yoi 

mayor of this noble city ! 
that he knoweth not, or so 
bereth not, or so hard- 
that worshipful man's lot ? 
His utter spoil and unde- 

Nevertheless, in 1478, 
(he was buried in the 
Friars in Broad Street, 
session of Gidea Hall — 




ders vessel and handed 
" The goods of Sir 
seized," says the chron- 
forth and commanded to 
The injustice which Sir 
visited on his persecu- 
Duke of Buckingham in 
strengthen his case 
following words : 

worshipful neighbour and 
Who of you is so negligent 
forgetful that he remem- 
hearted that he pittieth not 
What speake we of loss ? 
served destruction. 

when Sir Thomas died 
Church of the Augustine 
London), he was in pos- 
or rather the front part 



THE DUKE OF CLARENCE, 
WHO SAT ON THE JURY 
WHICH TRIED SIR 
THOMAS COOKE, AND 
WAS FABLED TO HAVE 
BEEN DROWNED IN A 
BUTT OF MALMSEY 



EDWARD IV., WHO 

RECEIVED A FINE 

OF £8,000 FROM SIR 

THOMAS COOKE 



of it, for that is all he had got built — and of other property besides about Romford, in 
eluding Petyts, of which there is a memory to-day in Pettit's farm.'j 

The people of Romford have cause to re- 
member Sir Thomas, if only because he helped 
them to the famous charter of the Liberty of 
Havering-atte-Bower. 

A great-grandson of Sir Thomas, Sir 
Anthony, was one of the tutors of Edward VI. 
What a story it is of his learning and the 
learning of his daughters ! 

It was the way in which he reproved one of 
his sons that led Sir Anthony to be recom- 
mended by Lord Seymour as the boy King's 
preceptor. " Some men govern families with 
more skill than others do kingdoms," said my 
Lord Seymour. It was Sir Anthony who is 
credited with having said : " There are three 
things before whom I cannot do amiss, my 
prince, my conscience, and my children." 

Lady Jane Grey seems to have received 
some of her education at Gidea Hall. When 
Mary came to the throne, Sir Anthony was 
sent to the Tower on a charge of supporting the cause of Lady Jane. When he was 
released he thought it safer to go to live in Strassburg and listen to the lectures of the 





43 





B Ft a^ 


9 

HI 

IE 



famous Peter Martyr, but he kept up a 
correspondence with Cecil. On the 
accession of Elizabeth, Sir Anthony was 
able to return to Gidea Hall, and became 
an M.P. and the Official Visitor of 
Cambridge and Eton. He was able to 
complete in peace the great mansion 
which his grandfather had begun. He 
made it less warlike in appearance than 
old Sir Thomas had planned, but re- 
tained the moat and drawbridge. AH 
over the great building were Greek, Latin, 
and Hebrew inscriptions. OfSirAnthonv 
the writer of State Worthies says : 




QUEEN MARY, IN 
FEAR OF WHOM 
SIR ANTHONY 
COOKE LIVED IN 
STRASSBURG 



TOMB OF SIR ANTHONY COOKE, 

HIS WIFE AND DAUGHTERS IN 

ROMFORD PARISH CHURCH 

The whole circle of art lodged in his soul ; his 
Latin fluent and proper ; his Greek critical and 
exact ; his philology and observations upon each 
of the languages deep, curious, various and 
pertinent ; his logic rational ; his history and 
experience general ; his rhetoric and poetry 
copious and generous ; his mathematics practical 
and useful. Contemplation was his soul, privacy 
his life and discourse his element, business was his 
purgatory and publickness his torment. 

Sir Anthony's daughters had no doubt 
been educated along with Lady Jane Grey. 
" And what a house did I find there ! yea, 
rather, a small university ! In this Tusculan 




SIR ANTHONY AND LADY COOKE, LADY BURLEIGH, 
LADY BACON, LADY RUSSELL, AND LADY KILLIGREW 



villa the industry of the females was in full vigour," said Sir William Haddon in an address 



SIR ANTHONY COOKE'S SONS-IN-LAW AND GRANDSON 



FRANCIS BACON, LORD VERULAM 



SIR NICHOLAS BACON 



LORD BURLEIGH 





GIDEA HALL THROUGH THE AVENUE 

to Cambridge University, at which he spoke of a visit paid by Lord Burleigh and himself 
to Gidea Hall. 

Sir William Cecil, the great Lord Burleigh, of the famous nod, and Lord High Treasurer 
to Elizabeth, was married to Sir Anthony Cooke's eldest daughter, and their son was 
Sir Robert Cecil, the first Earl of Salisbury, and the head of the present house at Hatfield. 
Lady Burleigh knew the Fathers, had translated St. Basil, and when a Bible in several 
languages was presented to her by Cambridge University, she returned thanks in Greek. 
She was spoken of by her husband to his son as his " matchless mother," she maintained 
two scholars at St. John's, Cambridge, she helped poor prisoners in London every quarter, 
and a legacy of hers, from which six needy tradesmen in Romford may have loans, 
has come down to our day. 

Sir Anthony's second daughter, Anne, was for some time governess to Edward VI. 
Her husband was the Bacon who was Keeper of the Great Seal to Elizabeth, and her son 
was Francis Bacon, Viscount Verulam, " the greatest and meanest of mankind." She 
translated an Italian divine, 
an Apology from the Church of 
England, from the Latin, and 
conducted a correspondence in 
Greek ; it was to her that Beza 
inscribed his " Meditations," 
and she was so much in ad- 
vance of her time as to 
champion the cause of the 
Nonconformist ministers. 

The third daughter's first 
husband was Ambassador at 
the Court of France, and her 
second Lord Russell, and from 
them is descended the ducal 
Bedford family. The inscrip- 
tion on the tomb of Lord 
Russell in Westminster Abbey 
in three languages is by his 
wife. Yet another daughter, 
equally learned and a poet, 
was married to the distin- the lime alley, gidea hall 




45 



guished Sir Henry 
Killigrew. 

What a visit by 
Queen Elizabeth to 
Gidea Hall, or any 
other such house for 
the matter of that, in- 
volved in those days 
we have some inkling 
in a letter to Lord 
Burleigh, wherein the 
to-be-honoured host 
beseeches that great 
man 

to inform him when the 
Queen might be expected, 
and to procure her High- 
ness to come to some resolution both of the time she would come and how long she would stay. For 
having sent already to Kent, Sussex, and Surrey for provisions he found all places possessed by other 
lords, so of course he must send to Flanders, which he would gladly do if the time were certain. He 
could not but beseech God that his house might not dislike her. But if her Highness had but 
tarried he had been but too, too happy. But God's will and her's be done ! 

A year after " Eliza Triumphans' " visit to Gidea Hall, one of Sir Anthony's sons was 
married to a cousin of Lady Jane Grey, and there is a letter in which his spouse complains 
to the Lord Treasurer that 

my Hap fall out to be put down by a Woman of no greater Birth than I take my Lady Cheke to be, 
for she doth not only offer me all the Wrong and Disgrace that she can in Court, in taking place afore 




GIDEA HALL AS IT IS TO-DAY 




THE ORANGERY- 




SaHL 




THE FISHPONDS, GIDEA HALL 



46 

me where it becorneth not me in modesty to 
strive for it ; but she openly publisheth to 
everybody that I have no place at all. 

Sir Anthony, in spite of his dislike for 
" publickness," held his court on the 
rush-covered floor of Romford court 
house, and there executed judgment in 
his humour. We read : 

Two capons and apples had been sold 
before the market bell sounded, contrary to 
the laws of the Manor ; the defendant is 
fined 6d. 

John Courtin assulted John Warren ; a fine 
of 3s. 4d. must be paid. 

Three tanners tan their hides ill ; they are 
fined 8d., 8d. and 3d. 

Three men are common butchers and two men are common shoemakers, and they sell meat and shoes 
for excessive gain ; they are fined /\.d. each to her Grace's Majesty. 

" Sepultus fuit Antonius Cocuus Miles auratus," says the Romford Church register of 
1576. At the north-west door of the church is the alabaster monument bearing Sir 
Anthony's effigy and the effigies of his wife and children. His daughters wrote the epitaph, 
which says that though called to "courtly life" he "more desyred in stvdy to be stalled" : 

Philosophy had tavghte his learned mynde 

To stand contente with contrye qvyet life, 

No highe advance or office of avayle, 

Covld tempte his thoughts to rowe beyonde his reache. 

By broonte of bookes he only did assayle 

The forte of fame, whereto he made his breache. 

Sir Anthony's will is accessible to the curious. " I Anthonye Cooke, of Guidy 
Hall," leaves " Nestes of Bolles" of gold, silver, and gilt — that is, sets of bowls one within 
another — to his sons, but to his daughters 

I will that of my bookes my daughter of Burleigh shall haue Twoo Volumes in latyne, and one in greeke 
such as she will choose of my gyfte. And after her choice, that my daughter Bacon shall have other 
twoo Volumes in latyne and one in greeke, such as she will choose. And after her choyce, that my 
daughter Russell shall have other twoo volumes in Latin and one in greke, such as she will chose. And 
after her choyse, that my daughter Killegrew shall have other twoo Volumes in Latine, and one in Greeke 
such as she will choose. And the residue of my Books I gyve to my Sonne Richarde. 

In the will of " my Sonne Richarde" there is a legacy of £10 and 56s. 4d. " to Little 
Will Coop'." He was, as the burials register shows, " ye dwarf of Giddie-Hall," and he 
lived nearly forty years to enjoy his pension. 

Gidea Hall is heard of again when Marie de Medicis made it her halting place on her visit 
to her son-in-law, Charles I. We are able to reproduce the drawing of Le Serre who 

accompanied the Queen 



FROM ROMFORD CHURCH REGISTER. 



1605. 



-George, the baseborne of one of my Ladye Coke's servants, 

baptist. 
1688. — A male child of Mr. Burch, Hothersalls, unbapt., buried. 
1690. — Thomas Love, son of John Love, a bl.ickamor^ servant at 

Gudy Hall, baptised. 
1707. — James Blackburn, and Jane ffeild, both of this Town, 

married at Guydy hall Chappel, by a License. 



Mother of France. He 
describes Geddy Hall as 
" belonging to a widow, 
considerable both for 
her virtue and noblesse." 
She had been the wife of 
the great-grandson of 
Sir Anthony. Before 
long the mischief-making 



47 

Queen, who had been " magnificently entertained in that beautiful house," was 
given, after popular disturbances, £10,000 to leave the country. We read that 
her hostess wrote in her will, " I will to be laid in the Vault belonging to Guydie hall as 
neere as may bee to my deere husband, S' Edward Cooke, and to be buried in the night 
but not chargeably interred." Her daughter married Sir Edward Sydenham, who com- 
pounded with the Commonwealth for £295. With the death of his wife, there passed 
away the last of the Cookes of Gidea Hall. 

In 1657 not on ly Gidea Hall, but a number of other estates which had been for two 
centuries in the Cooke family went for £9,000 into the hands of Richard Ernes. His son 
kept the old Crown Inn in Romford ! Within seven years the properties were sold again 
to one John Burch or Birch, W r est Indian planter, who, in the year of his death, 1668, 
was high sheriff of Essex. His will deals not only with the " Demense Lands of Guidie 
hall, with the Warren and game of Coneyes therein, called Guydie Hall warren," but 
with the future possession of " all my Servants, Negroes, Slaves, Cattle, etc.," in the 
Barbadoes. There are the two following entries in the burials register : 

1668, April 25, Cumber, a ffemale Blackamore servant from Guyddy Hall. 
1685, April 4, Madam Margarett Burch, Widow, from Guyddy Hall. 

Gidea Hall was to be in the possession of " Thomas and Burch Hothersall and their 
heirs forever." Nevertheless, before the centurv was out " the home of worth and learning" 
was once more the property of a knighted lord mayor, Sir John Eyles to wit. His nephew, 
also a Sir John Eyles and also a lord mayor, and a member of several Parliaments, was 
the last owner but one of Gidea Hall. Sir John Eyles, the second, pulled down the old 
mansion, the scene of Edward IV. 's depredations and the subject of Le Serre's drawing, 
and built the mansion, which, as enlarged by his successor, Richard Benyon, is shown in 
accompanying photographs. It is an impressive work in now charmingly weathered 
brick, in the fitting of which Adam and Flaxman both had a share. Not less satisfying 
to the eye are the old avenues, orangery, lime alley, fishponds, and gardens. 




THE LIME ALLEY AND BATHING TEMPLE, GIDEA PARK. 

Old though it is, it is the successor of the earlier Alley represented in Le Serre's picture 
temp. Charles I. on a previous page 



4 8 




A PANORAMIC VIEW OF ROMFORD GOLF COURSE 



GIDEA PARK OF TO-DAY 

SOME years ago the historic estate fortunately came into the hands of Sir Herbert 
Raphael, Bart., M.P. He arrested any possible advance upon Gidea Hall from the 
west, and did a conspicuous local service, by bestowing on the old town of Romford a 
large strip now know as Raphael Park. His transference of the remaining 450 acres to 
the Garden Suburb — to which the 90 acres of the Golf Course, in its midst, belongs — 
preserves, in every other direction, and in perpetuity, from destruction or disturbance 
scenes which have been a background for English 
history for so many centuries. The old order 
changeth, but nothing may now happen in the 
landscape of Gidea Park ' to trouble the shade 
of its old master, who stood " contente with contrye 
qvyet life," or of his grandson, who wrote that ' k a 
garden is the purest of human pleasures, the greatest 
refreshment of the spirit without which buildings and 
palaces are but gross handiworks." 



" We are at the 
cross roads between 
the old way of blind 
chance which means 
a repetition of the 
mistakes of the past, 
and wise foresight" 
— The Archbishop of 
York. 



" The Garden Sub- 
urb is a proof of 
what can be done 
■when order and 
design take the place 
of anarchy and 
chaos."— The Times. 



49 




mmaaaammm 

ROUND WHICH THE GARDEN SUBURB IS RISING 



IN laying out the new Suburb not only has the preservation of Gidea Kail been provided 
for, the old mansion house and its orangery — delightful examples of weathered brickwork 
— the fish and lily ponds, the lime alley and clumps of trees and shrubs, among which are 
veterans on which the eyes ot Lady Jane Grey and Queen Elizabeth must have rested — 
have been made the axial point of the whole plan. All those features which the buildings 
and the estate owe to the labours and expenditure of four centuries of owners will continue 
to lend distinction and grace to the landscape. 

It will be noticed that in both of the town plans illustrated on pages 54 and §5 the 
central road of the new Suburb follows the ancient avenue running eastward from Gidea 
Hall. The Broadway, Gidea Avenue and Elm Walk are all planned so that Gidea Hall 
and its fine Georgian clock-tower may form road terminals. In front of the Hall a 
spacious green has been laid out. Another road is planned along the 
side ot the fishponds, which contain hundreds of carp. The walled-in 
gardens form the boundary of Heath Drive, and some acres of ground 
are retained as the gardens of the mansion house, 
which is in excellent preservation and is inhabited. 

The new roads that have been made are not the hacked- 
out traffic ways of ordinary estate development. Wide, 
firm and satisfying, they have charming turns and 
sweeps among trees, more in the character of country 
lanes than ot regular roadwavs. One of the things 



" Close at hand 
were country corners 
untouched, and sum- 
mer shade in summer- 
time.'''' 
— Mrs. Thackeray 
Ritchie. 



"Within, thine ever- 
shifting look surprise, 
Streets, hills and 
dells, trees overhead 
now seen, Note dozen 
below, with smoking 
roofs between — A 
village, revelling in 
varieties." — Leigh 
Hunt. 

D 



5° 




GRASS, 

TREES, 

AND 

STILL 

WATER 



TWO VIEWS OF THE GOLF COURSE 



" It is my delight to 
be Both in town and 
in countree." 



which makes them so satisfying is 
the business-like foresight and enter- 
prise with which they were made. 
Money was not stinted, and it was 

spent early. The 

roads have the look 

of established public 

ways. 

Gidea Park is 
larger than Hyde Park. The heart 
of it, the golf course, round which 
this Garden Suburb is rising, will 
never be built on. The rest may 
be built on, but it will never be 
built up. Houses have come, but 
the stately elms in umbrageous 
avenues and stalwart belts, the 
great banks of thorn and broom 

remain. The fascinating shades of grey, brown, and red brick of houses have brought 
tints to the landscape, but its natural colours have not departed. Never were houses 
obtrusive in a rural scene. So artistically have they been set, and so skilfully have the 




new 
less 
new 




BLACK'S CANAL, RAPHAEL PARK 



5* 



IN THE 
GARDEN 
SUBURB AND 
RAPHAEL 
PARK . . . 



garden borders been 
planted by a firm famous 
throughout Great Britain 
and the Continent as 
tree-movers — they once 
moved in the south of 
England a yew popularly 
supposed to be men- 
tioned in Domesday 
Book — that it is very 
difficult to believe that 
these houses have not 
been here for vears. 

" O, the blessing of a little house," wrote Lady Orrery to her husband. " When 1 have 
^kingdom of my own I will look out for a cottage in it," Swift is made to say in " The 

Whether the New Suburban finds his little house or his cottage in 





IN RAPHAEL PARK 



Dean of St. Patrick's.' 
Gidea Park, he may sing 




A WIDE WALK IN RAPHAEL PARK 



Here the wind is heaping, heaping, 
Sweetest scent of summer's keeping. 



Here is displayed 
for children the 
scene pictured in 
" Child's Garden of 
Verses " : 

Now the next-door 
gardens lie 

Adorned with flowers 
beneath my eye. 



Not only has every house its fit garden, but there 
are no walls to shut them away. The gardens, with 
their low hedges, are as open as the gardens of Holland, 
and everywhere there are trees. Wherever the eye falls 
on a house it also takes in a tree. 

Full of fresh scents are the budding boughs, 
Arching high over a cool green house. 





■'■•^• V irf\'«r<i'».' *■ .*"*;■ 






r! :; v: 


•sap-.-- ..«.*« 
We***-- *» 






'•■ . '"rV - $ 


Sr^v* • > '' 


j 


W^fejSS . 








: » 


te ffc»iS^I 







IN GIDEA PARK 



5 2 





TWO'! INTERIORS IN THE FUR- 
NISHED COTTAGES WHICH ARE 
A FEATURE OF THE EXHIBITION 



>3 



THE FUTURE of the ROMFORD 

GARDEN SUBURB. By THE 

PRESIDENT OF THE LOCAL 

GOVERNMENT BOARD 

ONE of the most beautiful sites I have ever been associated 
with in twenty-five years' connection with Housing and 
Town Planning, surroundings formerly enjoyed in splendid 
isolation by the few. 

> t z. 5j< ^ >[C 

When this estate is completed, you will have one of the 
lowest death rates in England and Wales. You will be the envy 
of Bournemouth. 

5fl 5fS 3fC 3fC 

The object is to bring the Town into the Country and the 
Garden into the Town, to secure something more beautiful 
and more human than the majority of houses and streets 
erected in and around London during the past hundred years. 

From 13,000 to 16,000 families leave the central parishes 
of London every year. This must be cheering to the architects 
of this estate. Twelve of the central parishes of London are 
either stationary or declining. You, who are associated with this 
scheme, can rely upon it that the future is on your side. 





A model and an exemplar that in the next fifty years will be T he R romford S gar 
greatly followed. This Garden Suburb exalts the British ideal den suburb 

of the home. 

1 From the speech delivered by the Rt. Hon. John Burns in laying the foundation stone of the Romford Garden 
Suburb, July 28, 1910 




MR. BURNS AND SOME OF THE FIRST BUILDERS OF THE NEW SUBURB 

" The inhabitants of London are scarcely sensible of the beaut}" of its environs. It is in the power of every man 
to find himself in a sublime sylvan solitude superior to the cedars of Lebanon." — Disraeli. 



54 



THE TOWN PLANNING COMPETI- 
TION FOR THE GARDEN SUBURB 



A COMPETITION in 
connection with the 
Exhibition for the best 
Town Planning scheme /5"fv 



fl^^ffiajasfeeafiass*- 



FIRST PRIZE PLAN 




for the Garden Suburb has just been decided. The 
plans of Gidea Park furnished to the competitors 
showed the area around Gidea Hall in which roads 
have been already laid out and houses built for the 
Exhibition, and also the contours of the lancEand 
all the trees. The plans which received the first and 
second prize are reproduced. It will be seen that 
the area to be planned was in three parts. It is 
shown shaded. Both the prizewinners have adopted 
the natural and artistic course of making Gidea Hall the clou of their plans. The first prize 
of ^100 has been awarded by the judges — Messrs. E. Guy Dawber, v.p.r.i.b.a., H. V. 
Lanchester, f.r.i.b.a., and Mervyn E. Macartney, f.r.i.b.a. — to No. 37, viz., Messrs. W. 
Garnett Gibson and Reginald Dann. The second prize of ^50 goes to No. 20, Mr. GeofFry 
Lucas, a.r.i.b.a., and Mr. T. A. Lodge. The design of Mr. Oswald P. Milne, No. 34, 
was highly commended ; and the following were commended : No. 6, Mr. T. F. Pennington, 
a.r.i.b.a. ; No. 16, Mr. Frank Gray Wallis, Liverpool ; No. 27, Messrs. Robert Bennett, 
a.r.i.b.a., and Wilson Bidwell, Letchworth ; and No. 31, Mr. Gilbert Waterhouse. 



55 

An extra premium of £21 for a perspective drawing or set of drawings of the future 
Suburb has been divided, as, in the opinion of the assessors, two sets were of equal merit. 
The authors were Mr. Oswald P. 
Milne and Mr. T. M. Wilson with 
Mr. H. A. Welch. 

SECOND PRIZE PLAN 




The following comment by the Builder on the 
planning schemes will be read with interest : 

" The site to be dealt with had only slight variations in level, 
and the main factors in determining the lay-out were the utilisa- 
tion of the existing lines of fine hedge-row elms in the road views, 
the preservation of the remnant of a broad avenue leading eastward 
from Gidea Hall, and the provision of suitable access from Squirrels' 
Heath Station. Both the premiated designs meet the two former 
requirements satisfactorily, but the first design is more successful 
in dealing with the problem of access from the station by the 
provision of a diagonal road leading direct to the church site 
located on the highest ground in the southern portion of the 
estate. This design also scores in the planning of the detached 
piece of ground to the south-west, but in other respects the second 
premiated plan shows distinct advantages, notably in not demanding 
special building regulations to enable back land to be utilised, and 
in avoiding the cul-de-sac. The design by Mr. O. P. Milne, 
which was highly commended, runs the winners very close." 



^ 



w^ 










4ml 



.• 






-jrftl ■•P*6i III I;, 






'Me 

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HOUSES and COTTAGES IN THE 
EXHIBITION, WITH SKETCHES, 
PLANS and ARCHITECTS' NOTES 



I never had any other desire so strong, and so 
like to covelousness as that one which I have had 
ahvaies, that I might be Master at last of a small 
house. — Coze fey. 




A ROUTE THROUGH THE EXHIBITION 



59 

HOW TO SEE THE EXHIBITION MOST 

CONVENIENTLY 

' I *HE Map on the opposite page shows how the Visitor by Road or Rail enters the Exhibition. 

The Visitor whose time is limited must bear in mind that there are 140 Houses and Collages in 
the Exhibition, and that 3 minutes in each, with half an hour only for walking from one to the other, 
and half an hour only for refreshments, means an eight hours' day ! 

A decision must therefore be taken between : (1) A cursory inspection of all the Houses and Cottages ; 
(2) a cursory inspection of some, and a closer inspection of others ; (3) a close inspection of a limited 
number ; or (4) just a stroll, with an eye on the watch. 



The most convenient route from the Station in order to see all the houses is 

Parkway 
Meadway 



Balgores Lane 
Heath Drive 
Risebridge Road 
Heaton Grange Road 
Round the Reed Pond Walk 



Heath 

And back by Squirrel's Heath Avenue 
The position of Gidea Hall is shown on the Map. 



As, however, many Visitors will be able to see only a part of the Exhibition at a time, or will be in 
search of the work of particular Architects or Builders, the Roads are arranged in the following Catalogue 
in alphabetical order, and the Houses and Cottages in numerical order under their respective Roads. 

The Houses and Cottages are catalogued under their respective Roads, irrespective of whether thev 
belong to Class I. or Class II. 

The Name of every Road will be found marked up clearly at both ends of the Road. 

The Number of every House and Cottage is marked on a board in front. 

HOW TO FIND A PARTICULAR HOUSE 

OR COTTAGE 

I. — BY ITS ROAD OR NUMBER 

BALGORES LANE. — 1003, 1006, 1008, 1012, 1015, 1016, 1017, 1024. 

CROSSWAYS.— 1027. 

HEATH DRIVE.— 19, 20, 21, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44. 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 57. 

HEATON GRANGE ROAD.— 348. 

MEADWAY. — 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 274, 275, 
276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 286, 287, 288, 290, 291. 

PARKWAY. — 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213. 

REED POND WALK. — 214, 215, 216, 217, 219, 220, 221, 222, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233 
2 34> 2 35' 2 36, 237. 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 248, 249, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255. 

RISEBRIDGE ROAD. — 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 304, 305, 309, 310, 312. 314, 316. 317, 
319, 320, 321, 322, 324, 327, 332, 337 

SQUIRREL'S HEATH AVENUE.— Shopping Centre, 1046, 1047, 1048, 1089, 1090, 1091. 

E 2 



6o 



II.— BY ITS ARCHITECT'S NAME 



ANNAN, 216 

AXTEN. 1008 

BULKELEY, 295 

BAMFORD & AITKEN, 203 

BARROWCLIFF & ALL- 
COCK, 276 

BENNETT & BI DWELL, 40, 
271 

BENTLEY, 10 12 

BRIDSON, 233 

BRIGGS & ROSE, 238 

BUCKLAND & FARMER, 245, 
246, 261, 262 

BUNCE, 296 

BUNNEY & MAKINS, 15, 16, 

*7> 329 
BURGESS & MYERS, 210, 

211, 277, 290 
BURR & SON, 253 
CAULFIELD, 207, 209, 215 
CHARD, 304 
COLDWELL, 25 t 
•COX, 213 
CRANE, 286 

CRICKMER, 227, 228, 272, 273 
CURRY, 252 
DANFORD, 298, 312 
DAVIDSON, 1003 

EAST, 301 

ECCLES, 254 

FAIR & MYER (Shopping 
Centre), 202, 256 

FAVELL, 270 

FORBES & TATE, 201 

FOSTER, 236 

FYVIE & WILSON, 234 

GRAYSON, 284 



GREGG, 200 

GREEN, 8, 9, 10, 43, 274 

GRIPPER & STEVENSON, 
243, 257, 316, 322, 1089, 
1090, 1091 

GUNN, 241 

HICK, 317 

HIGNETT, 269 

HOBBS & GALE, 283 

HODGES, 319 

HOFF & MAXWELL, 278 

HOUFTON, 288 

JACKSON, 212, 259 

JEWSON, 260 

JOHNSON & BODDY, 19, 20, 
21/258 

JONES, 45, 46, 47, 48 

JONES, PHILLIPS & WHIT- 
BY, 220, 287 

KENNARD & COX, 275 

LAFONTAINE, 332 

LEGG, 221 

LEWIN, 281, 1007 

LONGDEN, 199, 240, 248, 280 

LUCAS, 208 

MAGER, 1047, 1048 

MAUCHLEN & WEIGHTMAN, 
217, 294 

MAY, 39, 205 

MAY & PERRIN, 1027 

MONCRIEFF & GRANT, 235, 
321 

MOORE, 266 

MORGAN, 219 

MURCH, 1015 

NEWTON & YOUNGMAN, 249 



NICHOLLS, 323 
OSLER, 309 

PARKER & UNWIN, 41, 239 
PEPLER & ALLEN, 57 
POWELL, 42 
RIDER, 299 
ROSE, 264 
ROSS, 314 
ROSSER, 222 
SAMSON, 324 
SAWDAY, 44 
SCHOOLING, 348 
SCOTT, 231, 232 
SEDDON, 214, 297 
SHERRIN, 305 
SHARP, 229 
SMITH, 327 
SPENCER, 310, 208 
SPOONER, 300 
; STARKEY, 265 
STEWART, 49 
TARRANT, 320 
THEAKSTON, 242 
TILDEN, 263 
TYRWHITT, 279 
WALL, 206 

WARWICK & HALL, 204 
WELCH, 255, 291 
WELLS, 237 
WILLIAMS-ELLIS, 244 
WILLMOTT, 282, 1046 
WILSON, 13, 14, 226 
WILLS, 1006 

YATES & MERRiSON, 230 
YOUNG & HALL, 1016, 1017 



III.— BY ITS BUILDER'S NAME 



ADAMSON & SON, 283 
ALLEN BROTHERS, 206, 244 
BLAY, 39, 205, 235, 321 
BEWLEY, 217, 294 
BROWN & SON, 305 



BUTCHER & SONS, 230, 295, 

309, 317, 1012 
BUTTERFIELD, 266 
DEAN & CO, 337 
DOWSING & DAVIS, 41, 300, 

348 



EMMETT, 1089, 1090, 1091 
FALKNER & SON, 43, 274 
FOSTER & DICKSEE, 238 
FRYER, 299 
GRACE & MARSH. 57 



6i 



III.— BY ITS BUILDER'S NAME— Continued 



HAMMOND & MILES, 275 

HARRIS, 243, 257, 316, 322 

HEY, 332, 100S 

HORSEY, 216 

HOUGH & CO., 207, 209, 211, 

213, 215, 229, 236, 249, 252, 

254, 260, 264, 314 
HUNT, 45, 46, 47, 48 
HUNNABLE, 212, 251, 259, 

263, 279, 286 
HURST, 220, 228, 239, 269, 287 
JARVIS, 241, 242 
JEFFS BROTHERS, 40, 271 
JONES & ANDREWS, 202, 

203 



JONES & ANDREWS, 256 

KING & SONS, 201 

LEWIN & SON, 281, 1007 

LONG, 214, 297 

LOVATT, 255, 319 

LOVELL & SON, 19, 20, 21, 
44, 222, 258, 278, 284, 1006 

MATTOCK & PARSONS, 227, 
272, 1027 

MAXEY & SON, 231, 232, 265 

MILLS, ion; 

MOSS & SONS, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 
15, 16, 17, 199, 200, 208, 
210, 219, 226, 233, 237, 240, 
245, 246, 248, 261, 262, 268, 



276, 277, 280, 282, 288, 290, 

291, 296, 301, 310, 329, 1016, 

1017, 1046 
NOBLE, 234 

PARTRIDGE BROTHERS, 49 
PARKIN, BAILEY & COATES, 

270 
PAUL, 327 
RIDER & CO., 42 
SHARMAN, 298, 312 

SHEPHERD BROTHERS, 

221, 320 
SMITH & SONS, 204, 1047, 

1048 
TRUSCOTT, 304 
VAIL & SHORE, 253, 324 



Catalogue of Houses^ Cottages 



BALGORES LANE 



BALGORES LANE. 

Class II. No. 100 -\. 

Architect: — T. Gerard Davidson, 

M.S. A. 

Builders: — J. Smith & Sons, Ltd. 

THE aim in arranging this house was to 
get more than one outlook from and 
sunlight into all the rooms, and, while keeping 

the detail simple, 
to a 1 1 o w the 
materials used 
to show in their 
natural decora- 





tive quality. Thus the joists over the ground floor are arranged 
as " beamed ceilings " to the rooms below, and add 6" more to their 
height. In the same way the tiled margin to the Kitchen greatly 
facilitates cleanliness while improving the appearance of this room. 
The windows are divided into lead lights to give scale to both the 
interior and exterior appearance. By these simple methods funds were 
available for the provision of excellent sanitary and other fittings, such 
as Bath, Lavatory, w.c, copper, dresser, flap table, sink, cupboards, 
grates, and range. 



62 



BALGORES LANE. Class II. No. 1006. 

Architect : — G. Berkeley Wills, a.r.i.b.a. Builders : — Y. J. Lovell & Sons. 

THE following are the points aimed at in this design : 
1. Good building and fittings throughout with minimum of up-keep in repairs and painting. 
Design depends on its proportion and materials, which are hand-made, sand-faced heather bricks, 

and hand-made, sand-faced red brick dressings and sand-faced 
tiles. No barge or soffit boards. 

2. Compactness of plan. The working Scullery contains 
large sink, copper, gas cooker, and dresser with cupboards 
under. 






3. The cottage has been designed for a middle-class tenant 
or as a golfer's cottage, and the frontage has been kept as 
narrow as possible to avoid a large ground rent. 



BALGORES LANE. Class I. No. 1007. 

Architect: — C. A. Lewin. Builders: — A. Lewin & Son. 

THE House stands 35' back from road, with a grass forecourt 2' above the road. 
All the rooms are well lighted, and the lowest point of ceilings in Bedrooms is 6' 10" above the floor. 

There is an excellent supply of rain water, supplied by taps over copper and sink in Scullery. 

Hot water is supplied to Bath, Lavatory, and Sink from Kitchen range. 

The staircase is wide and simple for climbing and getting up bulky furniture. 

The windows are all solid wood casements, with double-checked and weatherproof wood sashes, 
fitted with bars and wrought-iron fittings. 

The external chimneys and base of house are faced in hand-made grey and brindled bricks in cement, 
the remainder of external brickwork is coated with two thicknesses of self-coloured cement, 
rough-cast, and the roof is covered with hard, 
burnt red roofing tiles. 





63 



BALGORES LANE. 

Class I. No. 1008. 

Architect : — Herbert J. Axten. 

Builder:—]. D. Hey. 

THIS House occupies a site with south-west 
aspect in Balgores Lane. 
The facing bricks up to sill level and the 
chimney-stacks are of a purplish brown, the 






remainder of the external walls being covered with 
cement, rough-cast. 

The roofing tiles are of a mottled red colour. 
The long sloping roof and heavy-timbered porch 
form a quaint and attractive feature. 

The plan includes a spacious Lounge Hall. 

The Dining Room, with its open-timbered 
ceiling, has a cosy ingle nook, and the bay 
window of the Drawing Room is provided with a 
convenient seat. 

The four Bedrooms, Bathroom, w.c, and Linen 
cupboard are conveniently arranged off the First 
Floor landing. 



BALGORES LANE. Class 1. No. 10 12. 
Architect : — A. F. C. Bentley. Builders 



■H. Butcher & Sons. 



THIS House is constructed with 1 1 " hollow walls, lime whitened. The upper portions of the chimney- 
stacks, the dressings to the porch, and a few window sills are of dark red hand-made bricks. The 
jointing throughout has been pressed back from the face of the wall, which emphasises the divisions of 
the bricks by a deep shadow, thereby giving the walls a pleasing effect to the eye. 
The front door is of oak, left from the tool. 

The appearance of the house from the outside has a quiet, restful look about it, characteristic of many 
old Essex houses. 

On the Ground Floor, covered with solid 
flooring of wood blocks and red tiles, are a 
large Hall, a Cloakroom, with lavatory basin, 
and good-size Dining and Sitting Rooms. 
The Kitchen is doubly shut off from the 
chief rooms by doors leading through the 
Pantry. The Scullery is conveniently fitted 
with wash-down sink, draining-boards, plate- 
rack, copper, a large larder, and a coal- 
cellar. The Servants' w.c. and Garden Tool 
Shed are under the same roof, just outside. 

The Pantry is fitted with a wash- 
down wooden sink and china and glass 
cupboard, under the stairs being a 




64 

' store.'" The stairs are two short, straight flights. On the First Floor are four comfortable 
Bedrooms, each having a cupboard ; large Bathroom, with lavatory basin ; and Linen closet. 





PUW 



The house has been designed to save labour in cleaning and upkeep, and also to ensure dryness 
and uniformity of temperature by introducing hollow walls, properly drained, and solid floors of wood 
block and tiles. 



BALGORES LANE. 



Class I. No. 101 



y 



Architect : — Spencer Murch, a.r.t.b.a. 
Builder : — J . IY1 1 lls . 

THE Architect's endeavour in the planning of this 
house has been to make the arrangements as com- 
plete and as convenient as possible. 
The square Hall and Staircase form a distinct feature 
of the interior, and give a good effect on entering. A 
good deal of thought has been given to the Kitchen and 



GffOUND 

Plan 





Offices, so as to carefully cut them off 
from the rest of the house without in 
any way interfering with a quick service 
to and from the Dining-Room and the 
front door. 



The plan has been arranged to fit a piece of land with a moderate frontage without resorting 
to the usual method of putting the entrance door at the side. 

The building is of brick, coated with cement rough cast. The casements are glazed with leaded 
lights, and the roof covered with red tiles. 



^5 



BALGORES LANE. 

Class I. No. i o 1 6. 

Architects : — K. D. Young, f.jR.lb.a., 
and H. Hall, f.r.i.b.a. 

Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



T 



HIS House has an open entrance porch, 
with seat. 





yulcnen 


i 7fJ/^y 


Qn/n^Mxyn 




QLj&at 


h — 







The Dining Room has a large square bay window, 
and the Drawing Room a bay looking on, and 
leading into, the garden. 

Up to the level of the window sills on the Ground 
Floor the walls are built hollow, and faced with 
cherry red bricks. 

Above this level the walls are covered with rough- 
cast, distempered cream. 

The tiles are red-brown Broseley tiles ; the 
windows are all leaded lights in wood casements. 



BALGORES LANE. 

Class I. No. io 17. 

Architects : — K. D. Young, f.r.i.b.a., 
and H. Hall, f.r.i.b.a. 

Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



«^i 



T 



HIS House has an open wooden entrance 
porch with seat. 




€^<m 




The Dining Room has a large curved bay 
window, and the Drawing Room a bay with seat, 
looking on, and leading into, the garden. 

Up to the First Floor level the walls are built 
hollow, and faced with cherry red bricks. 

Above the First Floor level the walls are covered 
with rough-cast, distempered cream. 

The tiles are red-brown Broseley tiles ; the 
windows are all leaded lights in wood casements. 



66 




asafedftjfcjT, 



cover. This arrangement makes for economy as 
well as architectural effect. 

The building is faced with 2" bricks, and a 
feature is made of roofing tiles laid in horizontal 
and diagonal rows for effect, and the exterior has 
been designed with a view to reduce the necessity 
for outside painting to a minimum. 

The interior fittings are simple, chosen for use 
and utility, and ample accommodation in the 
way of fitted cupboards is provided. The internal 
fireplaces are all built in brick without chimney- 
pieces. 



BALGORES LANE. 

Class I. No. 1024. 

Architects : — J. D. Mathews, f.r.i.b.a., 
f.s.i., and H. Mathews, f.r.i b.a. 

Builders : — Bull & Esdailf.. 

THE designers of this building have com- 
prised the accommodation within a rectangle 
without any outbuildings. The house is planned 
so that all necessary offices are provided within 
four walls, including the Coal Store and Servants' 
w.c, as well as a Bicycle Store, and, with the 
excer>8i{m of the latter, are all reached under 




.A Kl v«t<g 



fcl7tO 




1 (JOCUND TLooii PLaN • 



RigT Tuxm PIaHj 




central stack and permit each Bedroom having a 
fireplace. The chief feature of the Ground Floor 
plan is the large Living Room. 

Ample cupboard space has been provided both 
on the Ground and First Floors. 

The materials externally are hand-made mottled 
red bricks for the plinth and chimneys, the walls 
generally being white-washed. The Roof is 
covered with hand-made, sand-faced tiles. 



THE CROSSWAYS 

Class II. No. 1027. 
Architects : — May & Perrin. 
Builders : — Mattock & Parsons. 



THE House has been planned with a view to 
economy in administration as well as in con- 
struction. 

All the fireplaces are grouped so as to form one 





ELM WALK 

For photographs of these houses, which are not for competition, see elsewhere in book. 



.67 



HEATH DRIVE 

No. 13 to 17 inclusive. For photographs of these houses, which 
are not for competition, see elsewhere in book. 

HEATH DRIVE. 

Nos. 19, 20 & 21 not for competition. 
Architects : — Johnson & Boddy. 
Builders : — Y. J. Lovell & Son. 




T 



HESE Houses, immediately facing the famous Golf Links, and adjoining an Avenue leading to 
Gidea Hall, are built of brick. (No. 19 is illustrated in Sketch and in Plan.) 

All external walls are built with cavities, 
the outer half being of dark red facing 
bricks. The roofs covered with sand-faced 
roofing tiles. 

•The windows are casements filled with 
lead-light glazing, with wide cames. The 
solid framing is of oak and the rest of the 
joinery of deal. The houses are planned 
as a group of three. The accommodation 
of each house consists of Drawing Room, 
Dining Room, Large Hall, Kitchen, Scullery, 
Larder, Pantry, Maids' w.c, and Coals on 
Ground Floor, the side houses having in 
addition a Lavatory from Hall. On the 
First Floor the centre house has three large Bedrooms, Dressing Room, Bathroom, w.c, and on the 
Second Floor a Bedroom for maids. The outer houses contain on the First Floor four large Bedrooms, 
Dressing Room, Bathroom, and w.c. Tt will be noticed that the rooms are all well lighted, the doors 
to the rooms well placed both as regards comfort and the placing of beds, etc. There are no 
outbuildings, and the garden elevations have been considered with as much care as the front elevations 





HEATH DRIVE. 

Class I. No. 39. 

Architect : — C. Quaife May. 

Builders : — W. F. Blay, Ltd. 

THIS house is built of brick, rough-casted 
on the outside and lime-whited, the base 
above the ground line being tarred in imitation 
of the old Devonshire style. The Roof is 
covered with red sand-faced tiles. The windows 
are glazed throughout with leaded glass, and 
are fitted with iron casements. 






• GROUND • FLOOE 



■FI25T fLOOC. 



The Front Sitting Room has an open aspect, 
overlooking the Golf Links. The Back Sitting 
Room, which faces the Garden, opens into a 
Garden Porch or Verandah towards the south-west. 

The Kitchen and offices are kept on the north- 
west side for coolness. 

On the first floor, in addition to the four Bed- 
rooms, there is a Bathroom, supplied with hot 
and cold water, and a hot linen cupboard. A box 
loft is provided in the roof. 

All the fireplaces are fitted with patent " Heaped" 
fires. 



HEATH DRIVE. Class I. No. 40. 

Architects : — R. Bennett, a.ri.b.a. & Wilson Bidwell. 



Builders : — Jeffs Bros. 




SPECIAL FEATURES.— A large Living Room has been 
provided at the south corner, which gets the maximum 

amount of sunshine. A Dining Room is connected with it by 

folding doors, which enable both to be used as one large room 

if desired. The Hall has been made as small as possible, and 

square in shape ; it also communicates with the Dining Room 

by folding doors, giving the alternative of a Dining Hall if 

required. The doors are kept together in the corners of rooms, 

so as to preserve the comfort of the fireside, and leave the greater 

part of the room free from passage way. A French window in 

the Living Room Bay gives access to the garden. The Kitchen has been put on the north-east 

corner to get the morning sun, and not to over- 
look the garden, and, here also, the doors are in 
the corner. A private yard has been arranged 
away from the road and screened off from the 
garden. Four good, square Bedrooms are pro- 
vided, with good positions for beds. All bedrooms 
have fireplaces. The Bathroom and w.c. are over 
the Scullery, and the Ground Floor w.c. for 
economy of drainage. The upstairs Landing is 
reduced to the minimum, so as to give all available 
space in bedrooms. Ample cupboard space has 
been provided. 




CROUND 
PLAIi 




BEDROOM 
PLAH 



HEATH DRIVE. No. 41. 

Not for competition. 

Architects : — Barry Parker & 

Raymond Unwin, f.r.i.b.a. 

Builders : — Dowsing & Davis. 

IN a house of this type neither Kitchen nor 
Scullery can be large, so that there would 
seem to be considerable advantage in not making 
them quite separate rooms ; but in arranging 
that during working hours such space as can be 
devoted to these apartments should be all in one, 
so that the work may be done more freelv under 




6 9 

less cramped conditions : and that when the Kitchen is to be made comfortable for sitting in, that 
part of it which is to be devoted to the sink and back door and such other things as appertain to a 
Scullery, can be closed off. Again, some sort of porch to a back door has many advantages, and 
a separate place in which the copper can be, so that the steam from it may not enter the house; 
some little covered yard space is generally appreciated. The cost of providing all these separately is 
in an instance such as this prohibitive, so a suggestion is here made wherebv some of their 
advantages may be secured within the sum to be spent. A most objectionable feature generally found in 

small houses is the little cramped entrance Lobby. 
It is not possible, of course, to devote much space to 
a Hall unless such space be obtained bv eliminating 
the second room for a chance caller to be shown 
into, or for quiet study, which is too great a 
sacrifice ; so that the suggestion here made is 
that, by having a comparatively wide opening 
between the Study and the Lobby, the feeling of 
crampedness in the Lobby can be done away 
with, excepting at those times when the Study 
is required for use as a Study. Callers may be 
received and interviewed in this Hall, and need 
not be taken further. 




HEATH DRIVE. 

No. 42. Not for competition. 
Architect : — E. Turner Powell, 



F.R.I.B.A. 



Builder. 



-F. Rider & Sox. 



<as& 



■ Romford o-^gdln 3u5uii& 




\ffmm0^ m ; 



THIS small House has been erected at the 
corner of Heath Drive and Meadway. 
Externally, for a height of 1' 6" above the 
ground, the brickwork is coated with tar, above 
which the walls are designed a buff tint, the 
wide joints of the brickwork showing through. 

The gable walls are finished with plaster work of a character in accordance with the tradition of the 
County. 

The door frames and windows are in Cypress wood, left unpainted. 
The roof is covered with iu Pantiles " and finished with a black ridge. 

Chimney stacks are built of brindled bricks, finished 
at top with black pots. 

Two Sitting-Rooms are provided — one in front over- 
looking the Golf Links, and one to the south-west, with 
door leading on to a large Shelter, and thence to the 
Garden. 

The Staircase leads out of a square and well-lighted 
Hall. 

Kitchen and domestic offices are arranged so as not 
to overlook the garden. 

Four Bedrooms are provided on the First Floor, each 
having a hanging cupboard. 

Bathroom, w.c, and Linen are cut off from the main 
corridor by a lighted lobby. 




7° 



HEATH DRIVE. Class I. No. 43. 

Architect 1 — W. Curtis Green, f.r.i.b.a. Builders: — Falkner & Son. 

PLANNED in the simplest possible manner — that is to say, within four walls without outbuildings. 
The materials used are hand-made bricks of a mixed colour laid with a cavity, rough-cast above 
the Ground Floor. The Roofs are covered with hand-made, sand-faced tiles, and the internal joinery 
is bass wood oiled. The Walls are distempered. 




~~ |BH)f? be 

3Llk 



BEDR/A 

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HEATH DRIVE. 

Class. I. No. 44. 

Architects : — A. E. Sawday, f.r.i.b.a., and 
T. T. Sawday, a.r.i.b.a. 

Builders : — Y. J. Lovell & Sons. 

THIS house has been planned so that the Living 
Room may obtain a maximum amount of sunshine 
and a view of the Garden. 

A small window has been inserted in the north-east 
wall of Drawing-Room overlooking the Golf Course. 

All four Bedrooms have been arranged on the First 
Floor in order to add to the comfort and convenient 
working of a house of this size. 




7i 




The base of the building is constructed 
with a hollow brick wall, faced externally 
with Staffordshire brindled bricks, the 
walls above being rendered with cement. 
The chimney stacks are also finished in 
brindled bricks. The roof is covered with 
red sand-faced tiles. The external woodwork 
is stained green, and the rendering coloured 
light green. 




Grourui floor Plan. 



first floor PUn.-**' 



HEATH DRIVE. Nos. 45, 46, 47 & 48. Not for competition. 
Architect: — Ronald P. Jones, m.a., lic.r.i.b.a. 
Builder : — J. A. Hunt. 






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THIS group of houses has been de- 
signed as a whole, in order to produce 
the effect of a symmetrical composition, 
with centre and wings, the two central 
houses being set slightly forward. 

The general design is an attempt to 
give practical expression to the theories 
of the " suburb house " advanced by 
Prof esse r Reilly in his address to the 
Town Planning Conference on the " Im- 
mediate Future." 

Brindled bricks have been used for the 
facings throughout, with a darker shade 




~2 



of brick for angle quoins, etc. The roofs are covered with grey-green slates, and the main cornice 
and porch pediments are painted white and the rest of the woodwork green. 

The effect obtained is quiet and pleasing, and recalls pleasant memories of the smaller Georgian 
houses, of which many fine specimens exist in Essex. The bouses command a fine view over the Golf 
Course and Park. 




m I 



HEATH DRIVE. Class I. No. 49. 
Architect : — William Stewart, 



F.R.I.B.A. 



Builders : — Partridge Bros. 



A 



LTHOUGH artistic effect has been aimed 
.at, the accommodation is based on the 
arrangements usually required by suburban 
tenants, and the house is in no way a building 
for exhibition purposes only, but a suitable home 
for a medium-sized household, planned to ensure 
comfort and the minimum of domestic labour. 



The Reception Rooms and Bedrooms are of good 
size ; the Bathroom has a hot linen closet ; the 
Kitchen is screened from the Hall, and has a lobby, 
out of which a large cupboard opens, suitable for 
beer, wines, and china ; there is also an enclosed 
china cupboard and larder. The Scullery opens 
direct out of the Kitchen, and is fitted up with a 
sink and draining boards, the floor being tiled. The 
hatchway between Scullery and Hall is for the 
convenience of service from the Dining Room to 
the Scullerv without traversing the Kitchen. 





HEATH DRIVE. Class I. No. 5 7- 

Architects : — G. L. Pepler, f.s i., 
6c E. ]. Allen, a.r.i.b.a. 

Bui/Jers : — Grace «Sc Marsh. 

THE House is built of brick with purple-grey 
brick plinth and chimney stacks, pointed 
in cement, with the rest of walls in smooth cement 
rough-cast. Roof in sand-face red tiles. 

The accommodation includes — on the First 
Floor : Four Bedrooms (two with large cup- 
boards), Bathroom, with porcelain enamelled 
bath, lavatory basin, and airing cupboard ; and 
on the Ground Floor,. Living-Room (20' 6" by 



7.5 




FIRST • FLOOt? 




12', exclusive of bay), fitted with special built-up fireplace and 
glazed china cupboard, Parlour, with ingle fireplace and door to 
Garden. 

Heights of rooms are such that the house could be reproduced 
anywhere in the Kingdom. Ground Floor, 8' 6" clear; First Floor, 
9' for most of floor space, and in no case sloping to less height than 6'. 

Staircase well lighted and with clear head room. 

Woodwork inside and out treated with " Jodelite." 

Walls inside distempered with " Wallene," supplied by the In- 
destructible Paint Co., Ltd., King's House, King Street, London, E.C. 

Larder with north aspect. 

Tiled sills to all windows. 

Specially designed fireplaces. 

Tongued and grooved " yellow " flooring. 

Picture rail to all rooms. 

Cement pointing and foundations. 

Only first-class materials used in construction. 

Casements hung on special hinges to make it possible to clean all 
panes from the inside of the house. 



HEATON GRANGE ROAD. 



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HEATON GRANGE ROAD. 

Class I. No. 348. 

Architect : — Stanley P. Schooling. 

Builders : — Dowsing & Davis. 



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^HE planning of this house has been carefully considered 
with a view to the comfort of the occupier and to economise 
:n domestic service. 

The largest Reception Room is of generous dimensions for the price limit imposed, and has views 
over both the back and front Gardens. 

The Kitchen, which is large and well-lighted, is within easy reach of, and yet well shut away from, 
the Living Rooms and front door. 

There is a separate Tradesmen's entrance, and 
throughout the house, landing and corridor, 
space has been reduced to a minimum, thus 
economising house-work. Ample cupboard 
accommodation has been provided. 

Externallv the materials are bricks covered 
with cement rough-cast and distempered cream 
colour, red brick chimney stacks and a tarred 
plinth. 

The house is wired for Electric Light, and Gas 
is also laid on throughout. 




74 



MEADWAY 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 256. 
Architects : — Fair & Myer, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — Jones & Andrews. 

IN this house there is a Sitting Hall 20' long, and arranged 
so that part of it can be curtained or screened off. 
The Living Room is 17' long, and has large cupboards, with 
good Scullery, Larder, etc., the back door being so placed that 
the tradesmen do not go round into the back garden. 

The Bedrooms are all large, and the Bathroom and w.c. are 
kept separate. 

The fireplaces have been made a special feature of design, and 
are not the ordinary shop-made patterns. 








For the outside treatment, brindled 
purple stocks, with red arches, etc., have 
been used. 





QmvHD Floop Plan 



Ri?5t Hoop Man 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 257. 

Architects : — Gripper & Stevenson. 
Builder : — A. Harris. 



T 



HIS is essentially a house for a north aspect, the four 
principal rooms all facing south. Advantage has been 




taken of this to place the Bathroom downstairs, giving room 
for a small extra room over the entrance, and good space for 




IS 

the linen and boxes. Externally, the low slope of the roof in front assists in the effectiveness of the 
treatment of the entrance. The whole is built in red bricks with red tiled roof and simple joinery. 




MEADWAY. Class II. No. 258 
Architects : — Johnson & Boddy. 
Builders : — Y. ]. Lovell & Son. 



o: 



iN the ground floor are Sitting Room (13' 6" by 
12'), Kitchen (14' 6" by 10'), with large bay, 
Scullery, Larder, Coals, and w.c. Although a range has 
been fixed in the Kitchen, a recess has been built in 
Scullery with flue to allow of a small range or gas 
stove being used for cooking in the summer. 

The Hall is of good size, and the staircase from same 
is well lighted. 

On the first floor are three Bedrooms (13' 6" by 12', 14' 6" by 10', 9' by 8'), Bathroom, linen 
cupboard, and large store cupboard on landing. The Bathroom is so planned that only a very short 
run of piping is required to supply hot water from 
Kitchen boiler. The same applies to Scullery sink. 

The house is built of bricks covered with cement 
rough-cast, tinted cream, the Roof covered with 
Albion sand-faced red roofing tiles. The windows are 
casements, filled with lead lights in clear sheet with 
wide cames. The whole of the woodwork externally is 
treated with " Solignum," the internal work being 
painted. 





MEADWAY. Class II. No. 259. 

Architect : — T. Gordon Jackson. Builder : — W. Hunnable. 

THIS Cottage is designed with a view of allowing the Kitchen to be used as a second Sitting Room 
by placing the cooking range in the Scullery. 
Access to the first floor, which comprises Bathroom, w.c, Cupboards, and three Bedrooms, is obtained 
off a small lobby with Entrance to the Garden adjoining. 

The Front Sitting Room is the general house room, with a 
large bay window, and is entered directly off the Entrance 
Lobbv and Porch. 





Larder, 
provided. 



coals, and ample cupboard accommodation are 




F 2 



MEADWAY. 

Class II. No. 260. 

Arc/uttct: — Norman Jewson, b.a. 

Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 



THIS Cottage is built of brick, rough-cast, the Roof 
covered with hand-made tiles. 





The Ground Floor accommoda- 
tion consists of Living Kitchen, 
Parlour, Entrance Hall, Scullery, 
Larder, and Coals. 

On the First Floor are three 
Bedrooms, Bath (hot and cold), 
w.c., and hot linen. 

The Living Kitchen, Parlour, 
and two principal Bedrooms have 
windows to the south-east. 




MEADWAY. Class II. Nos. 261 and 262. 

Architects : — Buckland & Farmer. Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



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HESE Houses are designed with a large Scullery, which might serve as a Kitchen if a maid is kept, 
in which case a door could be formed leading direct into the Hall, and the communicating door 




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between Scullery and Living Room kept for service only. In order that an adequate supply of hot 
water may always be available, it is intended to arrange for a back boiler in both the Living Room 




and the Scullery, each connected up with the circulating system, so that a fire in either room will 
ensure a hot-water supply. The Living Rooms are arranged with a view to comfort and freedom from 
draughts. 



HEADWAY. Class II. No. 263. 

Architect: — Philip Tilden. Builder: — W. Hunnablf. 



T 



HIS Cottage depends to a great extent on " aspect." The Living Room (21' long), facing south 
and west, looking out upon the Garden, affords more seclusion than the orthodox arrangement 






in which the principal rooms are kept to the front of the house. The Working Scullery has an extra 
flue for a portable Stove, so that on occasion cooking could be done here. 

Upstairs, besides the three Bedrooms, Bathroom, and w.c, there is ample Linen and Boxroom accom- 
modation. The flues gather together in the centre of the roof, and help to warm the whole house. 




Coals can be fetched without going out of doers. 

There are three good Bedrooms and a well- 
lighted Staircase. The Bathroom and Linen 
Cupboard are both of good size, and planned 
so as to be immediately over the Kitchen range, 
Scullery, w.c, etc., thus keeping the run of all 
water pipes as short as possible, and ensuring 
an immediate supply of hot water at all hot taps. 

All drainage is outside the house. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 264. 

Architect: — C. H. Rose, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 

THE external walls are finished with white 
rough-cast, the plinth and chimney stacks 
being of brindled brick. The Roof is covered 
with dark brown tiles. 

The internal joinery throughout is stained, 
and the joists are exposed in the ceiling of the 
Living Room. 

The principal room of this Cottage is the large 
Living Room, running right through from north 
to south, and lighted at each end. It is fitted 
with a cooking range, dresser, cupboard, and 
window seat, and communicates directly with a 
good Scullery. 





MEADWAY. Class II. No. 265. 

Architect: — A. P. Starkev. Builders: — W. Maxey & Son. 

THE general arrangement on the Ground Floor is intended to give as much Living Room space 
as possible — with this idea in view, the whole of the working part of the house has been concen- 
trated in the Scullery. The Living Room has ingle fireplace, with seat at one end, whilst a recess affords 
room for a specially designed dresser in elm. Folding doors are placed between the Living Room and 
Parlour, enabling them to be 
turned into one room. On the 
First Floor as much cupboard 
space as possible has been ar- 
ranged for. A Boxroom provides 
space for stuff otherwise taking 
up room in the bedrooms. 

Special features in Bedrooms 
I and 2 are the washstand fix- 
tures. The linen cupboard — with 
hot-water cylinder therein — is 
conveniently arranged with 
access from the landing. With a 




79 



view to economy, the staircase leads out of the Living Room, the Larder being partly arranged under 
same. The ceilings of Larder and Coals, etc., not requiring to be so high as the other rooms, the Bath- 





room and vv.c. on First Floor have been arranged to come over same, enabling one to land at the lower 
level from the staircase, and also concentrating the drainage. Old tiles have been used with good 
effect for the roof, and oak and elm have been used for the floors and doors, etc., as far as the price 
would allow. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 266. 

Architect: — Arthur H. Moore, a.r.i.b.a. Builder: — J. Butterfield. 




THIS Cottage is planned for economy in domestic service. The Living Room forms a centre, around 
which is placed the Larder, Store, and combined Kitchen and Scullery, with Range, Copper, Broom 
Cupboard, Pot Shelf, Sink, and enclosure. Within the Living Room is a fitted dresser, the greater 
part enclosed, a box seat and cupboards and shelves for books, etc., in the fireplace fitting. 
On the First Floor are three Bedrooms, Bathroom, and Cupboards. 



8o 






The exterior is designed in a simple cottage style, with rough-cast walls, tiled roof, and brick chimneys. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 268. 
Architect : — H. T. B. Spencer, 

A.R.I.B.A. 

Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 

THIS Cottage is built of brick covered with 
cement stucco, finished with a " mufHed " 
front, and distempered pale raw amber. The 
chimney stacks and other exposed brickwork 
are faced with mixed brindled and dark red 
sand-faced bricks, with mortar joints simply 
flushed off. The roof is covered with red sand- 
faced tiles, with antique pattern ridge. 





The woodwork generally is in selected deal, 
finished with two coats of brown " Solignum," both 
externally and internally, except the Bathroom, 
Scullery, etc., which, with the outside door frames, 
are painted white. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 269. 

Architect: — Cecil H. Hignett. Builder: — H. Hurst. 

THE conditions of this competition suggested the possibility of dispensing with the servant problem, 
and much consideration has been given to the saving of labour throughout, so that a resident- 
maid should not be essential, the special points being : that the Kitchen shall be a convenient working 
room, and, when required, a pleasant Sitting Room ; the Dining Recess is convenient for both the setting 
and clearing away of meals, allowing the Living Room to be always private and readv for use at any 



8i 



hour of the dav ; the Scullery, quite separate 
from the Kitchen, yet quite near to it, is com- 
pactly fitted with a dresser arid plate-rack, a 
sink with large draining board, a gas cooker, 
and many shelves. In the Kitchen, handy for 
the range, a sink, with taps over, is fitted, which 
can be closed from view when work is ended. 




«», 



VIEW ■ FOtM TME GAUDf-N 



A range with an open fire has been chosen as being more cheerful for a Living Kitchen. 
The larder has been placed on the coolest side of the house, and coals are accessible without going 
out of doors. 

All rooms have been planned to obtain the maximum of sunshine and privacy the plot would permit. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 270. 

Architect : — A. L. Favell. Builders : — Parkin, Bailey & Coates. 



THE Cottage faces the north-west, and was planned accordingly. As regards construction and 
treatment, the outer walls are 9" brick, coated above the plinth with smooth cement stucco, 

and coloured cream, the exposed brickwork — 
plinth and chimney-stacks — being built of 
brindle brick. Broseley tiles are used for the 
Roof, with half-round ridges. The floor timbers 
above portico are wrought and partly exposed, 
and the floor is 2" brick on edge, laid herring- 
bone fashion. The windows are all casements, 
sashes painted white and frames green. 





PL^n oraQoc\r,p ricoa 



PLAn or bcp aoon rug) g 



The Entrance Hall is roomy and well lighted, and 
the Staircase is made an attractive feature. The 
Dining Room and Kitchen face the south, and the 
Larder the north-east. Upstairs three Bedrooms, two 
facing south, separate w.c, Bathroom, and hot linen 
closet are provided ; also a good Box and Store Room 
is obtained in roof over the entrance. 




82 

MEAD WAY. Class II. No. 271. 

Architects : — R. Bennett, a.r.i.b.a., & Wilson Bidwell. Builders : — Jeffs Bros. 

SPECIAL FEATURES. — Compact plan. The Rooms are grouped round a small square Hall. Large 
Living Room facing south-east, cosy fire shielded from draughts. Comfortable Kitchen, with doors 
at one side. Porch large enough to take bicycles. Coal-place in back porch under cover. North 




Setti. : 





CROUrtDiPLATl 



BEDROOM: PLAT! 



Larder. Well-lighted staircase. Fireplaces back to back on internal wall, so as to have only one chimney- 
stack. Three good Bedrooms, with convenient places for beds. Ample cupboard space. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 272. 
Architect: — C. M. Crickmer, lic.r.i.b.a. 

Builders : — Mattock & Parsons. 

THIS House has two large Sitting Rooms and three good 
Bedrooms, Bathroom, etc., with a simple exterior, and so 
planned that it can be built in pairs if required. 

The drainage and plumbing are economically arranged. 






MEADWAY. 

Architect : — C. 



Class II. No. 273. 
M. Crickmer, lic.r.i.b.a. 



Builder 



-H. Hurst. 




THIS House has one large Sitting Room, Kitchen, Scullery, 
Square Hall, and a covered space, which is very useful in a 
small house, and acts as a lobby to the side door and coals. 

On the first floor are three Bedrooms, Bathroom, Linen, etc. 

The drainage and plumbing work are near the front to 
reduce cost, and the 
second entrance at 
the side leaves the 
garden free at the 
back. The aspect 
and views are care- 
fully considered. 

This house can 
be built in pairs if 
required. gsovnd plan first floor, plan 








83 
MEADWAY. , Class II. No. 274. 
Architect: — W. Curtis Grf.en, f.r.i.b.a. Builders: — Falkner & Son. 

PLANNED in the simplest possible manner— that is to say, within four walls without outbuild- 
ings. The materials used are hand-made bricks of a mixed colour, laid with a cavity, roughcast 






above the Ground Floor. The Roofs are covered with hand-made, sand-faced tiles, and the 
internal joinerv is bass wood oiled. The \\ alls are distempered. 




MEADWAY. Class II. No. 275. 

Architects : — Harold Kennard & Cox. 
Builders : — Hammond & Myles. 

THE primary object the architects had in 
view in the planning and design of this 
house was to give as great an amount of accom- 
modation as possible for the proposed outlay, 
consistently with thoroughly good workmanship 
and materials. 

The entrance is from a good-sized Porch to a 
well-lighted Hall, with Staircase and hat and 
coat cupboard, and off this latter there 
is a Parlour of good dimensions (17' by 12'), 



with bay window and large ingle-nook. 
This room has been panelled out and treated 
generally in an artistic manner. There is a 

good-sized Living Kitchen, with bay window, 
and opening out of same a Scullery fitted with 
sink and gas stove, and separate entrance. 
Leading out of Scullery there is a large coal store, 
larder, and linen cupboard. 

It has been found by experience to be more 
convenient in a house of this character to have the 
Bathroom and w.c. on the ground floor, thus 
giving greater size to the Bedrooms. This idea has 





CROVND EI.OOB ULAN 



FIRST ILODE I'LA.N 



»4 

been carried out in this house, and the Bathroom and w.c. open off the Hall, but are disconnected 
from the same by a Lobby. This arrangement has enabled the architects to provide three really good 
Bedrooms on the first floor. 

The fittings and finishings throughout are of a substantial character. 

In the treatment of the elevations a pleasant yet simple effect has been aimed at. 




MEAUWAY. Class II. No. 276. 

Architects : — G. H. Barrowcliff, 
a.m.i.c.e., & E. T. Allcock, a.r.i.b.a. 

Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 

THIS Cottage is designed to reduce domestic 
service to a minimum, whilst maintaining 
a high standard of comfort. 

The Living Room is 18' long, and has an 
ingle, with a combined open register and range, 
which is an efficient cooker, but has not the 
unsightly appearance of the ordinary stove. In 
the Scullery are a gas stove for summer 
cooking and a copper. Upstairs each of the 
Bedrooms has a fireplace, and there is a separate 
Bathroom and a w.c. 

Ample cupboards and storage room are 
provided on each floor. 

A seat in a covered verandah adjoining the 
front lobby has a pleasant south-east aspect. 



Externally, the walls are covered with cream- 
coloured cement, rough-cast, and brindled hand- 
made sand-faced tiles are used for the roof. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 277. 
Architects : — Burgess & Myers. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 

THIS House, finished in cement rough-cast, 
contains the conventional accommodation on 
the Ground Floor of Entrance Hall, two Sitting 
Rooms, Kitchen, etc., and is designed to give such 
accommodation with no waste space. The 
Entrance Hall and Staircase is 7' wide, and the 
Living Room has a floor area of 170 square feet. 
There is a roomy Larder opening out of the 
Scullery. 

On the First Floor all the internal partitions run 
straight up from those below, and are built of brick. 




CROWD FLOOR. 



SCMI Of f EFT 



85 

The area of the three Bedrooms is similar to that of the Living Room, Sitting Room, and Kitchen 
respectively. Each Bedroom is provided with a cupboard, the large room having two. There is a 
Linen Cupboard on the Landing, in which a hot-water cylinder is fitted for airing purposes. The Bath 
and w.c. are placed over the Scullery so that the noise occasioned by their use does not disturb the 
remainder of the house, and the whole of the plumbing and drainage work is compact, and therefore 
inexpensive. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 278. 

Architects : — Van 't Hoff & Maxwell. Builders : — Y. ]. Lovell & Son. 




R 



ED sand-faced bricks have been used for the building. The externa! walls are hollow, the front 
gable tile hung. 
A central chimnev stack rises from the intersection of the Roofs. 



Space is provided in the Lobby for a bicycle, 
and also accommodation for hats and coats. 

On the Ground Floor are Living Room, 
Sitting Room, and Kitchen. In the latter the 
range has a left-hand light, and space is pro- 
vided for a Copper. 

The First Floor has three Bedrooms, the 
necessary stores and cupboard accommodation ; 
also a Bathroom, with linen cupboard ad- 
joining. 




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86 




MEADWAY. Class II. No. 279. 
Architect : — T. Tyrwhitt, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builder : — W. Hunnable. 



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HE outside walls of stock brickwork are built with a 



hollow space for the sake of 
warm. They are finished outside 
with limewhite, except the lower 
portion, which is tarred up to a 
height of 2' 6" above the ground. 
Inside the walls are plastered. The 
windows are formed with wood 
frames and mullions, into which are 
fitted metal casements and leaded 
glass. The plan has been arranged 
with a view to economy of work in 
management and to obtain rooms 
of good dimensions without a sacrifice 
of quality in materials or workmanship, and a further point has been to 
obtain sunshine in all the Living Rooms. The joinery is of a simple descrip- 
tion, and in some positions advantage has been taken of the decorative 
quality possessed by ordinary deal, when carefully chosen, by simply staining 
it. In the exposed position at the angle of the Porch a post and beam of 
oak have been emploved. The Roof is covered with boards and felt and 
hand-made tiles. 



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MEADWAY. Class II. No. 280. 
Architect : — Reginald T. Longden. 

Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



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N effort has been made to depart in some 
degree from the usual type, and to give 





accommodation which shall meet the requirements 

of a household where domestic servants are not of 

necessity employed. 

The Sitting Room, therefore, while being quite 

detached from Kitchen by a good hallway, has 
the added advantage of a seated recess wherein a meal may be taken or study pursued without 
creating the otherwise inevitable disturbance of the Sitting Room. 



Cter.Ur ^A 



87 

This recess is served by a sliding hatch, and the service through Hall avoided. 

Ample china stores, etc., are provided, and the general convenience for a limited family is equal 
to that of a much larger house. 

The materials used are varied in colour, and the cottage is given a degree of importance by its bay, 
porch, and timbered gable of traditional type. 

The interior is characteristic of a fine period of English cottage architecture, with its open rafter 
ceilings, broad fireplaces of bricks and tiles, leaded glazing, and texture in all materials used. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 281. 

Architect : — C. A. Lewin. Builders 



-A. Lewin & Son. 



THE external walls to chimneys and plinth (18" high) are faced with fire flashed, hand-made, red 
sand stocks, weather-pointed in light cement. The remaining external brickwork is covered 
with self-coloured cement, rough-cast in two thicknesses. 

The chimney-pots are white fireclay. 

The Roofs are covered with brindled sand-faced, hand-made Staffordshire tiles and hog-back ridge 
tiles. 

The windows are all solid wood casements, with double-checked and weatherproof wood sashes filled 
with bars and wrought-iron fittings. 

The walls to the Bedrooms are high, being 7' at the springing. 






The whole of the joinery is made of thoroughlv seasoned timber. 

The rain water is caught in an elevated galvanised cistern, giving an immediate supplv by means 
of taps over the copper and sink in Scullery. 

The hot water is obtained by a first-class and simply-arranged geyser, which has its advantage over 
the hot water system in the early morning and summer time. , 

By the entire absence of passages, every space is utilised. 

The internal decorations are sombre, mostly brown ; the external painting to woodwork is entirely 
white, and the spouting black. 

The door and window furniture is entirely of wrought-iron and Berlin blacked. 



88 




HEADWAY. 



Class II. No. 282. 



Architect : — Ernest Willmott, f.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



IN this design the point to which first importance 
has been attached is that in each case there should 
be at least one good-sized Sitting Room and one good-sized 
Bedroom. 




GROUND FLOOR. PLArt 



FIRST FLOOR PLAM 



The Living Room is arranged to be independent of 
cooking appliances. The mistress's labour is reduced to 
a minimum by reliance upon a gas stove in the kitchen. This is necessarily a small room, but is 
sufficient for its purpose — viz., cooking and washing only. 

A boiler behind the Living Room grate provides the hot-water supply when this fire is in use. An 
alternative supply is available from a gas heater in the Kitchen. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 283. 
Architects : — Hobbs- & Gale. 

Builders : — A damson & Son. 



THIS Cottage was designed in a manner con- 
sistent with the traditions of cottage work in 
Romford and the surrounding districts. 

On the Ground Floor there is a Sitting Room, 
Living Room, Scullery, and offices ; and on the 
First Floor there are three Bedrooms, Bathroom, 





and w.c. The external walls are 9" brick rough- 
casted, with a tarred brick plinth, and the 
Mansard roof is of dark red, hand-made, sand- 
faced plain tiles. All external woodwork and 
ironwork to be painted dark green. Internal 
woodwork to be finished cream, and the walls 
cream distempered. 







8 9 
MEADWAY. Class II. No. 284. 
Architect : — Hastwell Grayson, m.a. 
Builders : — Y. J. Lovell & Sons. 

A COTTAGE with Mansard roof, faced with Sankey's brindled 
red bricks, n" walls to the gables and 9" to the side. 
The roof tiles are second quality " D.B." 





The Entrance Hall is large enough to hold a perambulator and a bicycle, and a loggia is formed under 
the staircase landing facing the garden. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 286. 
Architect : — Lionel F. Crane. 
Builder : — W. Hunnable. 

PLAN. — The plan provides for Parlour with bay 
window, Living Room with cooking range, Scullery, 
w.c, Larder, and Coals on the Ground Floor, and 
on the First Floor three Bedrooms, Linen Cupboard, 
and Bathroom. 





ROVNJF - PLAN 




8F!iJR4XSJ<J • PlAM- 



The walls are built hollow, with a ii" cavity, and are faced with grey, mottled bricks. The 
windows have tile arches over them, set in cement. The Roof is covered with dark brown hand- 
made, sand-faced tiles. The floors of Parlour and Living Room are laid with i\" wood block 
flooring on 6" cement concrete. 



9° 




It has been thought advisable 
to keep the Bathroom and w.c. off 
the half-landing ; the latter thus 
serving both floors better. 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 287. 
Architects : — Jones, Phillips & Whitby. 
Builder : — H. Hurst. 

THIS Cottage has been planned around one large Living 
Kitchen, with a fair-sized working Scullery opening out of 
it. On the First Floor are three good Bedrooms. 





GROUND PLAN 



FIRST FLOOR PLAN 



Externally, the treatment is brick and tile. Patterns in tiles have been introduced into the walling 



in a panel over the front entrance, and in the fitting up of the pug-holes, air-vents, etc. 
have been kept fairly simple and massive, and form a feature in the house. 



The Chimnevs 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 288. 

Architect: — Percy B. Houfton. Builders: — W. Moss & Sons. 



THE feature of this cottage is " open-planning," which prevents one wing from darkening another, 
and obtains ample light and air for all rooms. The Parlour and the two principal Bedrooms are 
cross-lighted and ventilated, and with the exception of the larder the house will be sunny and bright. 





OROUND PLAN ■ 

There are fitted cupboards, wardrobes, hot cupboard, dresser, and ample shelving, and a fireplace 
recess in the Scullery arranged for a gas-cooker for summer use. The offices are part of the ground 
plan, and thus add to the Bedroom space above. 

The brickwork is partly 14" and partly 11" cavity walling, with red sand-faced bricks banded with 
grey bricks. 

The roof is felted and covered with dark hand-made tiles 



9^ 



MEADWAY. Class II. No. 290. 
Architects : — Burgess & Myers. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



BUILT in mottled bricks, with sand-faced red 
tiles for the Roof. The external woodwork is 
painted cream. 

There are two good Sitting Rooms and Kitchen- 
Scullery on Ground Floor. 

The Living Room has a large recessed fireplace, 
with fireside seat, and a wide bay window, also pro- 
vided with a comfortable seat. 

The Coal place is accessible without going out of 
doors. 

A Hot-Air Cupboard opens from Staircase. 

On the First Floor are three good Bedrooms, all 
with fireplaces and roomv cupboards, and a Bath- 
room and w.c. 




GKOVND FltfE*. i* . f i.i. t 'i 1 



2«£ OF FEIT 




MEADWAY. Class II. No. 291. 

Architect : — Herbert A. Welch, 

a.r.i.b.a. 

Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



AN endeavour has here been made to pro 
1 



_vide not only a good Living Room — 
which the author imagines will really be used 
for the purpose its name implies, hence the 
provision of the range and dresser — but also a 
really good Sitting Room as well, of such 
dimensions that it can be used by a small 
family quite comfortably every day as distinct 

from the doomed " Sunday Parlour," about which we have heard so 'much.' The Scullery 

is of useful size, and thought has been given to the domestic arrangements generally, all of 

which have been planned so that they are under cover and close at hand, and a cycle store 

has been provided to satisfy the need in this 

direction. On the first floor three Bedrooms 

are provided, all of useful size with separate 

Bathroom and w.c, as well as ample cupboard 

accommodation. 

The materials are n" stock brick cavity 
walls twice lime-whited, with tarred plinth, 
2" red sand-faced bricks to chimney stacks at 
flank, and 3" reds elsewhere. Roof of hand- 
made, sand-faced red tiles, and all joinery in 
deal painted white. Plaster in three-coat 
sirapite. 





•GROUND FLOOR 
•PLAN • 



F/RST FLOOR ■ 
PLAN • 



9 2 



PARKWAY. 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 199. 
Architect : — Reginald T. Longden. 

Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 

THIS House is situated at the angle of 
Parkway, and overlooks in a southerly 
direct' on the Fish Ponds and the Gardens of 
Gidea Hall. An effort has been made to design 
a house which, as far as possible for the sum 
allowed, shall conform to the prevailing demand 
for a Georgian type. 





Colour and texture of material are the keynotes of the treatment, 
and its white woodwork, the broad masses of colour surface, give to it 
a character and dignity not usual in a small house. 

The accommodation is planned on lines which make for comfort 
of management, and comprise two roomy Sitting Rooms and Hall, 
Kitchen offices convenient to but adequately detached from latter, 
four Bedrooms, w.c, and Bath and Box Rooms, with the stairs so 
planned that ample light is thrown to every portion of passages. 

The materials used are sand-faced, hand-made bricks and tiles of 
varied colour, white gables, and woodwork throughout. 

The interior is simply treated, but the value of defined lines and 
well-designed fittings have been recognised as of paramount 
importance. The treatment throughout is white, and forms a back- 
ground unequalled for furnishing effect and an air of spaciousness. 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 200. 

Architect: — Theodore Gregg. Builders: — W. Moss & Sons. 



T 



HIS House is built of n" hollow brick walls, faced with a 
special preparation of distemper. The plinth and chimneys are 

built in sand- 
faced red bricks, 
and the roof 
covered with 
dark red sand- 
faced tiles, the 
external wood- 
work being 
painted white. 

The accommo- 
dation on the 
ground floor com- 
prises a Hall, a 
very large Draw- 
ing Room, with 





93 

a large ingle at one end, a Dining Room leading on to a Verandah, a spacious Kitchen-Scullery, and usual 
offices. This floor is so planned that servants can attend on the Dining Room without crossing the Hall. 
The staircase is contained in a square Hall, and lands conveniently on the first floor, giving access to 
all four Bedrooms, Bath, and w.c, without anv space being wasted in passages, etc. 




PARKWAY. Class I. No. 201. 

Architects: — Forbes & Tate. Builders: — King & Sons. 

THIS House is designed with the primary object of saving dilapida- 
tions and up-keep. 

To this end all woodwork has been minimised as far as possible. 

The windows have been built with brick mullions and steel casements 
in steel frames. The internal sills in red sand-faced tiles. 

Dutch brick fireplaces with oven tile mantelpieces have all been 
substituted for wood. Solid deal door frames have been substituted 
for door linings and architraves. 

The front door is in oak. 

The only portion of the exterior that requires painting is the back door. 

All internal partitions have been formed in brickwork or in patent 
fire-resisting, sound-proof partitions. 

The floors are in deal, except vestibule and servants' quarters, which are all in quarry tiles, wax 
polished. Tiles are used behind all sinks and lavatory basins, Bath and Kitchen range. 

The Living Room is entered from the vestibule, and is treated very simply with oak beams and 
a Dutch brick fireplace. 

Adjoining this, and separated by a curtained recess, is the Dining Room, similarly treated. 

Both rooms can be entered from the vestibule independently of each other, and the service between 
Dining Room and Kitchen can be carried on without coming through the house. 

The Kitchen has a through draught, with a window placed to particularly light the Kitchen stove, 
which is of French make and fitted with a high-pressure boiler, the advantage being economy of fuel. 
The stove heats up quickly, and this type is found easier and cleaner to work than the typical Kitchen 
range. 

The Scullery is separated from the Kitchen by a wide opening, as in this type of house it is found 
more convenient to use them as one room. 

The offices are all connected up to the Scullery by a corridor to the back door. 

The four Bedrooms on the first floor all enter off a corridor. All these rooms have each a large cup- 





Gftot/noftooR 



FKST FJLOO.%. 



board, which does away with the necessity of wardrobes and gives more space in the rooms. There 
is also a hot linen cupboard on the first floor corridor for storage of linen and blankets. 

Bath and separate w.c. are as much out of the way as possible. 

As to materials, all the walls internally are treated with paperhanger's canvas and distemper, no 
plaster being used except to ceilings. 



94 

This method is found to be cheap, more durable, and the house can be occupied within a few days 
of its completion, besides giving a pleasing effect. 

The woodwork to doors and frames is grey stained and flat varnished. 

The design meets the requirements of a modern house, a large Living Room, easy working, and no 
dilapidations. 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 202. 
Architects : — Fair & Myer, a.r.i.b.a. 



Builders : — Jones & Andrews. 



T 



HE special feature in this House is a large Living Room, 24' long, with beamed ceiling and ingle 



nook. 



The Dining Room is a comfortable size, and the Kitchen and Offices are very complete, being so 
arranged that the tradesmen do not have to go into the back garden to get to the back door. 





ssgfe 



'FiR5T- FLOOR- PLAri' 



In designing the Bedrooms, special care has been taken in planning the position of doors and windows, 
so that the beds and furniture can be properly arranged, as shown on the plan. 

All the fireplaces have hearth fires, and have been specially designed. 




<• G2CUMD « PlAM ' 




Externally, the walls are faced with brindled purple stocks, and the roofs are boarded and covered 
with red hand-made tiles. 

All the outside walls are built with a non-conducting interior air space, to insure warmth and dryness 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 203. 

Architects : — D. Bamford, a.r.i.b.a., & Aitken. 



95 



Builders : — Jones & Andrews. 



THE architects have endeavoured to provide a comfortable house, simply planned and well lighted. 
Compactness has been obtained by the elimination of all waste space, and in no instance has comfort 
been sacrificed to appearance. The relations of the rooms one to another, and their particular uses, 
have been carefully considered. The Kitchen, with its accompanying offices, is secluded from the 






Living Apartments, but conveniently placed for service to them. The Bathroom adjoins the principal 
Bedrooms. The staircase has been made a special feature ; it is placed in a bay, and divided from the 
Hall by an open screen, and the stairs go up free of any turnsteps or winders ; ample light is given to 
the Landing by transomed windows lending themselves to sympathetic treatment in the matter of 
curtains. 

The external elevations have been designed with a view to obtaining in a modern house that sense 
of repose which distinguishes the buildings of a century ago. 

PARKWAY. 

Class I. No. 204. 

Architects : — S. Warwick, a.r.i.b.a., & H. A. Hall, a.r.i.b.a. 

Builders : — Jas. Smith & Sons, Ltd. 

EXTERNALLY the House is treated on simple cottage lines, the interest of the design depending 
on a sense of good proportion on the pleasant grouping of the component parts. The quiet 
colour scheme of red hand-made tiles, red chimney stacks, white lime-washed walls, and green shutters 
harmonise with the simple character of the design. A large Porch, formed by sweeping down the 
main Roof, helps to emphasise the entrance, the door of which is in oak studded with nails. Passing 
to the inside, it will be seen that particular attention has been given to supplying the greatest possible 





9 6 

accommodation at the cost stipulated, while a good working plan is perhaps the principal feature 
in the design. The internal decoration is entirely in keeping with the style of the house, while simple 
red brick and tile fireplaces appear in all the rooms, the Dining Room possessing a deeply recessed 
ingle, which adds greatly to the comfort of the room. The ground floor ceilings have the joists 
exposed, thus giving greater height to the rooms, and harmonising with the scheme of decoration. The 
Kitchen quarters are roomy and well equipped with modern conveniences. The external walls of 
stock bricks, being n" hollow, are dampproof. The lintels and framework to Porch are of deal, 
with Solignum finish. The aspect of the house is excellently situated, as the sun travels round the 
three exposed sides. 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 205. 

Architect : — C. Quaife May. Builders : — W. Blay, Ltd. 

THIS House is built of brick, faced with red bricks of mixed tints, and roofed with hand-macie. 
sand-faced tiles. 
The windows throughout are glazed with leaded glass and fitted with iron casements. 




The Front Sitting Room has a bay window, with a sunny aspect, overlooking Raphael Park. The 
Second Sitting Room faces towards the Garden, access to which is gained from this room through a 
Garden Porch. The Kitchen and offices all face the cool north-west side of the house. 






OECOhu -FLOOR . 



On the upper floors, in addition to the Bedrooms, there is provided a Bathroom, with hot and 
cold water, linen cupboard, and hot cupboard. 

All the fireplaces are fitted with patent " heaped " fires. 



97 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 206. 
Architect : — R. L. Wall, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — Allen Brcs. 

THE plan of this house has been arranged 
with the idea of obtaining as much sun- 
light in the main rooms as the site will allow. 
The Dining Room, facing north-east, has the 
benefit of the morning sun at breakfast-time, 
and the Drawing Room is a cheerful room for 
the rest of the day. 




, GROUND 

L.CCA1JJ FLODR 

PLAN 



^SCULLf® I 

- **H)ININg| 

CUP! 

HAfey 

DRAWING t w 
RGDM 




FIRST 
FL®R 
PLAN 



Cupboards have been provided where possible 
— i.e., in the Lobby for coats, under the stairs, 
in the Scullery and Kitchen, and in three Bed- 
rooms. In the Scullery also is provided a position 
for gas stove, copper, sink, and draining board. 

The exterior walls are covered with rough 
plaster rendering, buff colour-washed, with the 
exception of string course, quoins, etc., which are 
colour-washed without being plastered. 

The Roof is covered with red, hand-made, 
sand-faced tiles. 

The woodwork to windows and minor doors is treated with a wood preservative, that of the front 
door, staircase, etc., painted white. 




PARKWAY. Class I. No. 207. 

Architect: — S. B. K. Caulfield, f.r.i.b.a. (Messrs. Spooner & Caulfield). 

Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 

THE walls are faced with brindled bricks and red dressings. Hand-made tiles cover the roof. 
Both the Living Rooms overlook Raphael Park. All rooms have a sunny aspect, and the Kitchen 
and Bathroom catch the early morning sun. The Bedroom windows are double-hung sashes, and 





FUST FJ_o* 1M 




CHOUNO aoo» PUN 



being in every case protected by the eaves, they 
allow for ample ventilation without the risk of 
rain coming in. All other windows are side-hung 
casements. 



9 8 




r?r^= 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 208. 
Architect: — Geoffry Lucas, f.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 

ACCOMMODATION.— On the Ground Floor is a 
roomy Entrance Hall, with Store and Hat 
and Coat Cupboard. The wide and easy-going 
Staircase, without winders, is screened from view of 
Front Door, and convenient for service. The 




Kitchen is well fitted with Store Cupboard and shelving, and screened from the Entrance Hall. The 
Scullery is fully fitted with sink, draining board, plate-rack, shelving, copper, and position for gas cooker. 

On the First Floor there are a large and light Landing, three Bedrooms, with space for double beds, 
good-sized Bathroom, with lavatory basin, and large, warmed hanging and linen closet. 

On the Second Floor is a large Bedroom, with fireplace, roomy Box Store and Cistern Room. 

There is a tiled dado to the Bathroom, red-tiled cills inside windows of Kitchen, Scullery, Bath- 
room, etc., and red quarry tiled floor in Hall and Scullery, and cement floor in Larder. Glazed tiled 
hearths to fireplaces. 

GENERAL DESIGN. — The general treatment is of symmetrical and simple character. The whole 
house is contained within four square walls, without outbuildings. Attention has been paid in the 
design to economical use of space within the walls, general convenience of plan, privacy of Kitchen, 
Bathroom, etc., simplicity of roofing and exterior design, the whole tending to economy of up-keep 
and service. 

ASPECT. — The house faces south-west, so that all rooms obtain sunshine during a portion of the 
day. 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 209. 

Architect: — S. B. K. Caulfield, 
f.r.i.b.a. (Messrs. Spooner& Caulfield). 

Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 

THIS House has a large Drawing Room (21' 
long, nearly 12' wide), with a window facing 
south-west, overlooking the Park, and French 
casements opening into the garden at the back. 
A fair-sized Dining Room (13' long, 10' 6" wide) 
also overlooking the Park. The Kitchen has been 
arranged together with the other offices to 
facilitate house work as much as possible. There 




99 




FIRST CLOOE PLKN 



are four good Bedrooms on the First Floor, a 
Bathroom, and W.C. The stairs end in a fairly 
spacious landing. A linen cupboard, with the 
hot water circulator in it, is placed over the 
Kitchen. The idea of the design is to secure, 
as far as may be, the comfortable home-like 
look of the English eighteenth century houses, 
with modern conveniences. 




OHOUND FUDOI FUN 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 210. 

Architects : — Burgess & Myers. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



BUILT in brickwork, and finished with cement 
rough-cast, the Roof being covered with red 
sand-faced tiles, the external woodwork painted cream 
to match rough-cast. 

The Sitting Rooms on Ground Floor open from 
a roomy Hall. The Drawing Room has a cosy 
ingle nook, with a fireside seat, and a door opens 
on to a wide Verandah facing the Garden. The 
Kitchen premises are well shut off from the rest of 
the house, while the Kitchen is so placed as to be 
quite handy for serving. Good Scullery and Larder 
accommodation is provided. 



4t?4 





"WW*" r f-iS^a,^ 



FIRST FLOOR 






hjmwwnjiuiinsi; 

i«I*i 



mmm 




iCM£ Of KET 



The First Floor comprises four Bedrooms, all of 
which have fireplaces and large cupboards, while 
a separate Linen Cupboard is provided on 
Landing. Maids' hot and cold taps are provided on 
First Floor. 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 211. 
Architects : — Burgess & Myers. 
Builders: — G. E. Hough & Co. 

THE external walls are built of brick in double 
thickness, with a cavity between, and faced 
with mottled red bricks. The Roof covered with 
red sand-faced tiles. The elevations are rendered 
formal by windows being regularly placed. 

The Ground Floor is designed to form a roomy 
Entrance Hall, octagonal in shape, from which the 



IOO 

Drawing and Dining Rooms open on either side. The Kitchen has a well-lit range and a roomy 
cupboard. The Scullery entrance, Coals, Larder, and w.c. are arranged with every care for the con- 
venience of the house. 

On the First Floor the Landing and Staircase are 6' 6" wide, and give access to three Bedrooms 
all fitted with cupboards and fireplaces. The Bath and w.c. are separate, and are placed in an 
unobtrusive position, and the Linen Cupboard is contrived on the Half-Landing. 

In the Roof there is a large Bedroom, with a fireplace, and also a large Box Room. 

The plumbing and drainage are kept compact, well separated from the Living Rooms. 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 212. 

Architect : — T. Gordon Jackson. Builder : — W. Hunnable. 

THIS design represents an endeavour to combine in a rectangular building on a narrow frontage, 
a compact plan with a maximum floor area for the rooms. 

There is a small Entrance Lobby or Vestibule, giving access to a Front Sitting Room, which has a 
recessed fireplace and seat in one corner. 






The Hall proper, enclosed from the vestibule by a glass door, merges with a Dining Recess 12' square 
into one long apartment, out of which the staircase leads. 

The Kitchen and Pantry are entered off a small lobby, and there are ample Kitchen offices. 

Upstairs are four Bedrooms — two large and two smaller — on the first floor, and one Bedroom and 
Boxroom on the second floor. 

Ample cupboards are provided on each floor. 

The materials used are brick externally, for the facing of the house with bright bands and offsetts, etc. 

Flat mixed red roofing tiles. 

The windows, casements, are glazed in small squares and painted white. 



IOI 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 213. 
Architect : — Alfred Cox, f.r.i.b.a. 



Builders 



-G. E. Hough & Co. 



THE materials externally are brick walls covered with cream-coloured rough-cast. Tile Roof. 
The windows are casements hung at side and opening outwards. 
Internally, the floors are of yellow deal generally, but the Scullery, etc., is paved with red Quarry 
tiles. The walls are plastered and coloured with distemper or plain paper. 




GQCNNt- noce. iw 




The fireplaces are simply treated with tiles and wood chimneypieces, the stoves being of a kind 
to give the maximum of heat with the minimum of coal. 

The whole house is designed to give as much accommodation as possible without waste spaces, 
so as to ensure an easy and economical working from the domestic point of view. Everything is 
kept simple in treatment, and the working parts of the house have had particular consideration so 
as to save unnecessary cleaning. 



PARKWAY. No. 329. Not for competition. 

Architects : — Michael Bunney, a.r.i.b.a., & Clifford Makins, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — Wm. Moss & So\ T s, Limited. 




THE plan is arranged so as to provide one large 
Living Room, whose privacy is secured by the 
provision of a moderate-sized Sitting Hall, where 
casual visitors can be detained, and which effectually 
disconnects the kitchen quarters ; separate access 
from the kitchen to the 
staircase in its turn 
keeps the Sitting Hall 
from being a mere pas- 
sage room. The three 
Bedrooms are all of 
moderate size, and the 
Bathroom and w.c. are 
provided with separate 
apartments. 

The general treatment 
of the exterior, withbrick 
parapetted gables to „, 
main roof and dormers, 
a large central stack 
and pantiles, is on the 
traditional lines of East 
Anglian work. 




F/esr FLoae F>j_p,rr. 




102 



PARKWAY. Class I. No. 332. 
Architect : — P. Cart de Lafontaine. 
"Builder:—]. D. Hey. 

THE three ideals aimed at in planning this 
house are : — Firstly, economy of space ; 
secondly, minimum of cost ; and, thirdly, reduction 
of housework. 

These points have been obtained by grouping 
the rooms around a central " staircase hall " — thus 
eliminating all passages and dark corners — and 
also by planning the Kitchen in as compact a 
manner as possible, with the Larder, Coal Cellar, 
Back Entrance, and Maid's w.c, all in the most 
easily accessible positions, yet quite shut off from 
the Living Rooms of the house. 

The Parlour and Dining Room have been 
planned so as to provide well proportioned, 
■comfortable rooms, avoiding " ingle nooks " and 
■other odd-shaped recesses. Special attention has 
been given to the aspect and lighting of these two 
rooms. 

The Bedrooms are arranged with a convenient 
space for the bed, away from windows and doors, and _a -^fireplace is provided in each room, these 
being so planned that only two chimney stacks are required. 

A novel feature is the overhanging bay window in the Bathroom — the bath is so placed that by this 
means it is possible to keep the waste outside the building from the bath itself to the main drain. 
Another feature is the balcony and terrace on the garden side of the house. 





PARKWAY. Class I. No. 337. 
Architect : — Frank Nicholls. 
Builders : — J. & J. Dean. 



TI 




HE house is so planned that while the 
Scullery, Larder, etc., face north, every 
other room in the house has some portion of 
sunlight during the day. 

The external walls are covered with roughcast, the 
chimney stacks and base being of red bricks, and the 
roof is covered with dark red hand-made tiles. 

The floors are of wood, with the exception of the 
Vestibule, which is covered with red tiles, and the 
Scullery, Larder, etc., which are paved with 
granolithic. 

The walls of the Bathroom are 
tiled with white tiles to a height of 
5', and the whole of the interior 
joinery, with the exception of the 
Drawing-Room, which is white 
enamel, is stained, thus saving con- 
siderably in up-keep. 

All the fittings are of good quality 
and of modern design and con- 
struction. 



REED POND WALK. 



*°3 




REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 214. 
Architect : — -Joseph Seddon, a.r.i.b.a. 
Bui Ida- : — John Long. 

THIS House has been so planned that every room has sun- 
light at some time of the day, and at times suited to the 
uses of the rooms — e.g., morning sun in the Kitchen, in the 
Dining-Room all day, and the Dra wing-Room in the afternoon. 
The Larder faces north-east. 

The Hall is large, and when the double doors to the Reception 
Rooms are thrown open there is a spaciousness, both in 
appearance and in reality. 

The Bedrooms are arranged so that the beds are out of 
draughts between door, window, and fireplace. 

Other advantages from the housewife's point of view are : Good 
left-hand light to kitchener, ample provision of cupboards, 
Dining- Room 
and Kitchen con- 
veniently plan- 
ned for service. 



The sanitary arrangements are grouped together to 
secure economy and efficiency in the hot-water supply 
and the drainage. 

The exterior of the house is simply treated with 
Crowborough purple-brown bricks, with red brick 
dressings, white painted casements with leaded lights 
.and red sand-faced tiles to roof. 




REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 215. 

Architect : — S. B. K. Caulfield, f.r.i.b.a. (Messrs. Spooner & Caulfield). 

Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 

THE walls are faced with purple bricks and red dressings. Hand-made tiles cover the roof. The 
front of the house faces the green. All rooms have a sunny aspect, and the smaller Living Room, 
Kitchen, and Bathroom catch the early morning sun. The Bedroom windows are double-hung sashes, 



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.-and being in every case protected by the eaves, 
they allow for ample ventilation without the 
possibility of rain coming in. All other windows 
.are side-hung casements. 




104 




REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 216. 
Architect: — R.Annan. Builder: — H. R. Horsey. 

THE house has been designed with the windows of the 
principal rooms facing south, so as to obtain the maximum 
of sunlight possible. 



*Zr&un& rfa? ~- 




The outer walls are built hollow, to ensure the house being dry in severe weather, and effective damp 
courses are placed under all walls. 

The rooms are all of good size, two of them being 16' long. 

A verandah at the rear of the house, facing south, forms a pleasant feature of the plan. 

All the external walls are faced with a good red brick, and the roof is covered with best hand-made 
tiles. 

The woodwork externally and internally is painted white, the internal work generally being finished 
with white enamel. 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 217. 
Architects: — Mauchlen & Weightman. 

Builder: — Isaac Bewley. 

THIS House has been planned to minimise 
domestic labour and give the maximum 
accommodation for the sum of ^500. Both the 
Dining-Room and the Drawing-Room have 
sunny aspects, and are placed to overlook the 
flower garden and avoid the dust and noise of 
the public road. The Garden can be entered 
from the Drawing-Room through the deep, 
usefully-shaped verandah. The Kitchen, with 
cool aspect, is conveniently near the entrance, 
and is well screened from the Hall. A wide and 
excellently lighted staircase, with cloak space under, leads up to a compactly arranged Bedroom Floor. 
All the Bedrooms are of ample size, and are carefully planned to take furniture. Cupboard accommoda- 




tion, including large Linen Closet, 
is provided. The Bathroom faces 
east, thus getting the morning sun. 
The exterior effect aimed at is one 
of quiet charm and interest without 
the use of any elaborate detail. 

Materials used for exterior are 
bricks of varying colours for walls, 
thick hand-made tiles of dark tone on 
roofs. Wood casement windows 
opening outwards and painted white. 





' U| 



%» 







REED POND WALK. 

No. 218. Not for Competition. 
Architect : — E. J. May, f.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — W. F. Blay, Ltd. 

THIS house was designed on symmetrical lines, 
with a central gable on the east to come on the 





axis of the continuation of Reed Pond Walk, one Sitting Room getting the view down this part 
of the road, the other Sitting Room looking down the Garden, and the Kitchen having the cool aspect 
in front of the house. 

The walls are built externally in red bricks of various shades, and the Roof is covered with hand- 
made tiles. The windows have solid wood frames, wrought-iron casements, and leaded glass. 

Internally, the woodwork of the Hall and Staircase is finished with a green stain and polished. 



REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 219. 

Architect : — H. Townshend Morgan. 

Builders ; — W. Moss & Sox. 

THIS house is built of brick, lime-whited, the 
walls where less than 14" thick being hollow. 
The projecting gables and chimney stacks are of 
brindled, sand-faced bricks. The roof is covered 
with dark red hand-made tiles. The woodwork, 
both inside and out, where not painted, is stained 
with Solignum. 




ic6 

- Tn planning special regard was paid to aspect, every habitable room being arranged to face south- 
east over the Garden, while the Dining and Drawing Rooms and two best Bedrooms have south-west 
windows as well, thus taking advantage of every possible glimpse of sunshine. 

The Kitchen premises are cut off from the rest of the house by a Service Lobby, from which open 






FIRST FLOOR 



ATTIC 



the Larder and China Cupboard. Direct communication with the Dining Room is, however, provided 
by means of a serving hatch with double doors. Ample accommodation has been provided, and the 
airing cupboard in the Bathroom is heated by the hot-water cylinder. 

The Boxroom could be converted into a sixth Bedroom at a slight additional cost. 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 220. 

Architects : — Jones, Phillips & Whitby. Builder : — H. Hurst. 



THIS house is built with red bricks, chosen for their variety of colour, and is roofed with sand- 
faced tiles. Where possible small patterns in tiles have been introduced into the walls — viz.. 
pug-holes, air vents, etc. 

The plan has been arranged so that the Living Rooms may get the south aspect, whilst the north 




FIR5T FLOOR PLAN 





side has been given up to the Staircase, passages, and offices. All the 
drainage has been kept together as far as possible, and the Bathroom 
and hot air closet for linen, etc., have been planned close to the 
Kitchen range. 



io7 




REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 221. 
Architect : — T. E. Legg. 
Builders : — Shepherd Bros. 

THE accommodation is shown in the plan. 
The following points may be noted : On 
the Ground Floor the Living Room has a good 
china cupboard, and the Hall, not giving direct 
access to the stairs, could be curtained off on 
occasion and used in connection with the 
Drawing Room. 

A store for cycles or garden tool store is 
provided. 

The verandah can be used in connection with 
either Living or Drawing Room, and as a means 
of access to garden from both. 

There is a good linen cupboard on the First 
Floor. 

The upper part of the walls are of bricks, 
faced with red hand-made tiles (this arrange- 
ment insuring greater freedom from damp in 
the upstairs rooms, where fires would not be 
frequent). 

The Scullery, Larder, Porch, Verandah, and Passage to Side Door are paved with red quarries on 
concrete. 

The deal casements are stained with Carbolineum, as is most of the woodwork where showing. 
The front door is in oak. 




GERUND FL0OE PLAN 



ni?5T flOOY PLAN 



REED POND WALK. 



Class I. No. 222. 




Architect : — F. Endell Rosser. 
Builders : — Y. J. Lovell & Son. 

THIS house has been carefully planned to 
facilitate house work as far as possible. 

The Drawing and Dining Rooms have ingle 
nooks, which are treated in an artistic manner. 

Four good Bedrooms are provided, together 
with ample cupboard accommodation. 

The materials used are red facing bricks to plinth 
and chimney stacks, the remainder being coated 
with cement rough-cast, distempered with cream 
distemper, internal woodwork finished with white 
enamel. 



io8 






The Roof is covered with sand-faced tiles; the casements are fitted with leaded glas* of artistic 
and simple pattern. 

REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 226. 

Architect : — T. Millwood Wilson, 

lic.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 

THE house has been planned so as to obtain 
all the sunlight possible. The Dining Room 
has a window facing east so as to get the early 
morning sun, and a large south window in the 

end gable. The Hall window faces south, and the Parlour, in addition to its south window, has a 
large window facing west, with an uninterrupted view of the sun setting over Raphael Park. 

Externally the house is built with hollow walls of hard stock bricks, distempered cream 

colour, with a Roof of hand- 
made silver-grey tiles, and the 
windows are leaded lights and 
iron casements. The chimney 
stacks are of local red hand- 
made bricks 2" thick. 

The walls generally inside are 
treated with cream distemper. 

"REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 227. 

.Architect : — C. M. Crickmer, lic.r.i.b.a. Builders : — Mattock & Parsons. 

THIS house has a frontage of 33' 7", with 
large Living Room, Dining Room, Kitchen, 
Scullery, and offices, with four good Bedrooms, 
Bathroom, etc. It can be built in pairs if required. 






ic9 




The house can be built in pairs if 
required, and can be adapted for 
several aspects. 

The drainage and plumbing work 
is all near the front, thus reducing 
cost, and the Servant's Entrance, being 
at the side, leaves the Garden free at 
the back. 



REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 228. 

Architect : — C. M. Crickmer, 

LIC.R.I.B.A. 

Builder: — H. Hurst. 

THE house contains a large Living Room and 
smaller Dining Room and Kitchen, with a con- 
venient Hall and Stairs, Cycle place and offices, and 
four Bedrooms, Bathroom, Linen Cupboard, etc. 

The exterior is of varied colour sand-faced brick- 
work, with sand-faced tile Roof. 



^ 





GROUND PLAN 



FIR3T FLOOR. PLAN 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 229. 

Architect : — Cecil A. Sharp, a.r.i.b.a. Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 



THIS cottage is architecturally based upon the ideas prevalent during Tudor times, but, of course, 
with modern adaptations to suit the tastes of those likely to occupy the cottage. Aspect has 
been well considered to give ample and proper sunlight to each apartment and to secure a pleasant 
outlook. 

Two rooms and the Entrance Hall upon the Ground Floor may be thrown into one large room at 
will by the easy removal of a few panelled partitions, which, when in position, form the panelling to 
the rooms. This is an undoubted convenience in a small cottage, as by having one large room in 
the summer time an air of spaciousness is given. 

The Kitchen and Scullery are planned as one large room, all the fittings being conveniently arranged. 
Modern sanitary fittings are of such a character that it is no longer necessary to confine them to 

a separate department. This arrangement gives 
spaciousness to what would otherwise be a 
cramped, confined, and inconvenient department. 
Upon the Ground Floor, in addition to the 
Kitchen and Living Rooms, provision is made for 
a good Staircase, Larder (not facing south), Coals, 
and Sanitary Convenience (not next to the Larder, 
as it is sometimes found to be). 

Architectural effect has been sought by 
proportion of parts, roofing and skyline, 
and the effective use of material, avoiding 
expensive and elaborate detail work, which is 
seldom found in the work of the old cottage 
builders. 




I IO 



The walls are of hard bricks in good mortar without the unnatural aid of " pointing," which spoils- 
softness of line and ruins the colour scheme. To keep out the weather cement-coloured or pale cream 
has been used to cover the work externally, except where red facing bricks are seen. The red facing 
bricks vary in colour from dark or nearly black brindle colour to yellows, with all shades of reds laid 

at random, and not in any way 
selected, and with this work is in- 
corporated random pieces of tile 
work, pieces of burred brick and 
stone. In the entrance and chimney 
stack (which is the chief external 
feature of the cottage) some Ham 
Hill stone has been judiciously used. 
The windows are of the casement 
pattern, with leaded lights, carefully 
proportioned, and having antique 
fittings. 

The Roof is a covering of soft, 
sand-faced red tiles, avoiding all 
hard lines by cocking up the gables, 
sides, and hips and valley tiles. 

The interior of the cottage is of a 
quaint and old world appearance, 
with its ceiling beams and rafters exposed, and all coloured a dark oak colour. The brick fireplaces are large 
and open, with thin red tile hearths. The mantelpieces are of wood, and there are cosy window seats. 
The cottage has been furnished by Messrs. Hampton & Sons, under the direction and supervision 
of the architect, in the William and Mary period, and the cost of this furnishing has been kept 
within the possibilities of the means of those likely to occupy the cottage, nothing of an extravagant 
nature having been included. 




#ec3$,jjZ ffifi 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 230. 
Architects : — Charles W. Yates & C. R. Merrison. 
Builders : — H. Butcher & Sons. 

IN planning this house two main considerations were kept 
in mind : First, to adopt a type of plan which would not 
necessitate a plot of land with a wide frontage, and thus 
avoid overburdening the building with a disproportionate cost 
of land ; and, second, to provide in the pla'n the maximum 
amount of efficient room space. It was felt that the sizes of the 
buildings did not justify the wasting of space in ingle nooks, 

large halls, etc., how- 
ever desirable such 
things might be in a 
bigger house. 

The plans have ac- 
cordingly been kept 
perfectly simple and 
the space utilised to 
the utmost. 





'<»,■> <L3& 



The Hall is thought to be of sufficient size, and the 
Reception Rooms are large, as are also the two best Bed- 
rooms. 



1 1 1 

In none of the Bedrooms do sloping parts of the Roof make their appearance in the ceilings to 
create difficulties in the disposition of furniture. Cupboards are provided in all Bedrooms. 

The great advance made in recent years in the use of gas for household purposes has been taken 
advantage of, and gas has been installed both for cooking and heating, in addition to, and as an 
auxiliary to, the coal fire. 

As regards the elevations, simplicity is the keynote. The walls are covered with rough-cast, the 
roofs are boarded and covered with hand-made tiles, and the effect is left to simplicity and proportion. 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 232. Class II. No. 231. 
Architect: — M. H. Baillie Scott. Builders: — W. H. Maxey & Son 



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WALLS. — Brick, 9" thick, rough cast, colour washed . 
CHIMNEYS.— Brick. 

ROOFS. — Covered with old red tiles. 

FLOORS.— English elm. 

DOORS. — English elm, with ash ledges and Norfolk latches. 

CEILINGS. — The joists are shown and whitewashed. Beams 
in English oak. 

GENERAL INTERIOR FINISH. — Ingle fireplaces in 
principal rooms, with oak beams and seats in elm. 

Wall hangings and other fabrics specially made by the 
Deutsche Werkstattin from the designs of the architect. The 
greater part of the furniture has been selected from the 
cottage furniture made by Messrs. Heal, and the remainder has 
been specially designed by the architect. 

The serving hatch from Kitchen to Dining Room consists of 
a revolving cupboard. 

Ample cupboard accommodation is provided in the Bedrooms, 
and much of the furniture consists of fitments. The Linen 
Cupboard is heated by the cylinder. 



1 1 



A special white-glazed food locker is provided in the Pantry. 
The Kitchen range is a " portable " one. 

The grates used throughout are specially designed hob grates. The ornament on these has been 
modelled by Mr. Bankart from the architect's designs. 





A gas cooking stove and boiler are provided in the Kitchen. The Scullery sink is so fotmed that a 
separate basin for washing up is not required. 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 233 
Architect : — T. R. Bridson, m.a. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



THIS plot contains enough space for a 
tennis court. It slopes down from the 
road, but the ground floor level of the house is 
kept a foot above road level, and a short level 
causeway leads from the road to the front 
door. At the back, the Dining Room window 
is treated as a French window, and a flight of 
about ten steps leads down from it to the 
garden. 

The yard is at one side of the house. 
There is an old hedge in front. 




The height of the Ground Floor rooms is 8' ; of the First Floor, 8' 6" ; and of the Attic Bedroom, 8' 





ATTIC- PLAN 



F/AS r- fLOOX-PMN 



The plans and the perspective drawing sufficiently show the accommodation which has been provided, 
and the pleasant architectural treatment of the exterior. 



U3 




REED POND WALK. Class I. 

Architects : — Fyvie & Wilson. 
Builder : — F. Millar Noble. 



No. 234. 



A SPECIAL feature of this cottage is the entire isolation of 
the Kitchen quarters from the rest of the house, a servery 
forming the means of communication between the Kitchen and 
Dining Room, without the necessity of entering the adjoining 
Hall, an unusual advantage in so small a residence. 



There are two large Reception 
Rooms, Kitchen, Scullery, a large 
pantry, and ample storage, besides 
the usual offices, on the ground 
floor, and four Bedrooms (two for 
double and two for single), with 
a Bathroom, w.c, and linen cup- 
board on the first floor. 

The house has been planned 
with special regard to economy 
of service. There are no passages 
or badly lighted corners, and all 
the rooms open off either the Hall or Landing. 

Externally, simplicity of treatment has been aimed at. Good colours in the building materials and 
careful attention to proportion have been relied upon for effect. 

Red brick walls, plaster facing to the bay and gable, and a Roof of old tiles are the principal 
materials used. 




GROUND FLODT3 



TZQDQ. 




REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 235. 

Architects : — 

W. W. Scott Moncrieff & Grant, 



a.r.i.b.a. 



Builders : — W. F. Blay, Ltd. 



T 



HIS house will be found to possess many 



turesqueness has been subordinated to comfort and 
practicability, and the architects have considered 
internal accommodation and fitments of more im- 
portance to the householder than a showy exterior. 

A glance at the plans will show the dispositions of 
the various rooms. 

The entrance has been made at the side so that 
both the Parlour and Living Room should face south and secure the maximum amount of sunshine. 

Every Bedroom and attic contains a fireplace. The internal mouldings have been kept as flat as 
possible so as not to catch the dust. 

There is ample cupboard and storage accommodation, and a bicycle shed conveniently placed by 
the side of the front door. 



1 14 



The site falls away from the 
frontage, and those Bedrooms 
which face north will have a 
fine view over the surrounding 
country as a compensation for 
their aspect. 

The exterior is of plain hand- 
made brickwork, and the Roof 
is covered with hand - made, 
sand-faced tiles. 

The construction generally 
will be found to be exceptionally solid, and the architects have spared no pains to make this 
house as convenient and attractive as possible. Provision has been made for electric lighting if 
desired, and gas is also laid on 





ATTICS. 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 236. 

Architect : — Frank Foster, a.r.i.b.a. Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 

THE Sitting Rooms are of good size for a house of this class, and the Kitchen is of sufficient size 
for one servant. The tiled porch leads to a convenient Entrance Hall, thence to the corridors, 
from which the rooms are entered well away from the external doors, and a separate door to Garden is 
provided. 

The Upper Floor is reached by an easy staircase, with ample landing space, and provides two large 
Bedrooms, and two of medium size, and a good-sized Bathroom, with linen closet adjoining. Fire- 
places are arranged on external walls, well away from doors, allowing convenient positions for beds, etc. 




Gftpufio floo/i. Pun 




Aajr /ioo^ fi/jin 




Externally, the walls are finished in rough-cast, and coloured ivory white. The chimney stacks are of 
brindled bricks, with bright red tiled caps and black pots, and the cills and drips to windows are of 
bright red tiles. The plinth finished in red bricks. The tiles to roof of a warm sepia colour, and the 
whole of the woodwork, including casements, finished a rich dark brown stain. The casements have 
lead lights, with §' lead cames, those which open of wrought-iron fixed to the wood frames. The pavings 
to front porch and Garden Entrance are of red quarry tiles, with red bull-nosed brick curbs. The drainage 
is simple and economical. 



IT 5 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 237. 

Architect : — A. Randall Wells. Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 

ASPECT. — The House is planned to suit the aspect, and can boast of a south-east Dining Room, 
a south-west Drawing Room, a south Hall, and a north Kitchen and Larder 

ROOMS. — The Sitting Rooms are arranged with especial regard for the relative positions of the doors, 
windows, and fireplaces, and any advantage that may be gained by having internal chimney-stacks 
has been sacrificed to the far greater advantage of having comfortable firesides. 

LINEN CUPBOARD AND HOT WATER.— 

The hot water tank is in the airing cupboard on 
the First Floor, placed immediately over the 
Kitchen range. 

VENTILATION.— In addition to other lights, 
the three chief Bedrooms have lifting sash 
windows, so that top ventilation can easily be 
obtained. 




FLUES. — The two Sitting Rooms and the 
Kitchen have separate ventilating flues in the 
chimney stacks. 

SUN SHUTTERS.— The south windows of the 
Bedrooms and Sitting Rooms have sun shutters 
to allow of shade and ventilation in the summer. 



DOORS. — The doors all have rebated sills, standing an inch above the floor level (experience has 
shown that this does not form a stumbling-block) to prevent the usual unpleasant floor draughts, and 
to allow for the thickness of rugs and mats. 

PERAMBULATOR AND BICYCLES.— There is a space under the half-landing in Hall to take 
a perambulator and two bicycles. 





GKXiND FLOD^PIAN 



"FTRST FLOOR. PLANT 



STAIRCASE. — Easy of ascent, with 7" risers and 10" going, with cupboard on half-landing. 

RAIN-WATER. — All rain-water is collected in galvanised iron tanks in roof of lean-to, and connected 
to tap over Scullery sink. 

Y\ ALLS. — Keyed Fletton bricks, plastered inside and outside with hand-made stock bricks, plinths, 
and chimney caps. 



1 1.6 




REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 238. 

Architects : — M. S. Briggs, a.r.i.b.a. 

& C. H. Rose, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — Foster & Dicksee. 

IT has been the aim of the architects in designing 
this house to provide a type suitable for use in 




F1R-5T FLQ3R PLAN 



the suburbs of towns rather than on isolated sites in the country. They have, therefore, aimed at 
an effect which would bear successful reproduction in rows, without altogether losing the idea of a more 
rural style. 

The front is occupied by the two large Living Rooms, which are thus amply lighted. Particular 
care has been taken to isolate the Kitchen quarters from the Hall, while ensuring easy communication 
with the Dining Room and the Entrance Door. 

The sanitary arrangements are so placed as to be least conspicuous in the house. 

The Larder faces north. 

Bearing in mind the fact that many housewives regard the house as subservient to its cupboards 
and lumber rooms, the architects have provided unusual facilities in this direction, without altogether 
subordinating aesthetic considerations to the necessities of storage. Few houses of this class have such 
accommodation for linen, hats and coats, boxes, brushes, and stores generally. 

The walls are of brick rough-casted ; the roofs covered with very dark red tiling ; the plinths and 
chimneys of purple Crowborough bricks. 



REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 239. 
Architects : — Barry Parker 

& Raymond Unwin, f.r.i.b.a. 
Builder: — H. Hurst. 

IT seems specially important when designing 
houses of this type to avoid falling into 
the error of saving initial cost at the expense 
of future maintenance and up-keep. If by 
spending an additional £10 at the outset 
an equal amount can be knocked off the 
painter and decorator's bill recurring every 
three or four years, it is obviously bad economy to save £10. If by a little addition to the initial 
cost a saving of two or three hours each day in the time spent in cleaning and dusting and keeping 
the house tidy can be effected, it is equally good economy to incur the extra initial cost. To mention 




ii7 

a few other points which have been considered, where the building frontage is comparatively limited, 
and the front has the pleasantest outlook and sunniest aspect, it is far too precious for any of it 
to be devoted to an entrance lobby, but should all be reserved for the windows of the principal rooms. 
If the Hall is intended to be used as a Sitting-Room the first essential is that the traffic from room 
to room or to the stairs or front door should be confined to part of the Hall, and that service from 
the Kitchen into the Living Room should be possible without passing through the Hall. The Kitchen 
should be shut off from the Hall by double doors so as to keep back sound and smells. We should 




G-ROUND- FLOOR RAN 




FIRST- FLOOR -PLAN 




bear in mind that in a small house, where room cannot be found for a Butler's Pantry, there is 
perhaps more carrying to and fro between the dining-table and the Scullery than between the Kitchen 
and the dining-table, so that it is quite as necessary to make service between the Scullery and the 
dining-table easy as between the Kitchen and dining-table, and it is certainly better to arrange, if 
possible, that this traffic shall not pass through the Kitchen. 

Other points are : The Bath, Lavatory, Sink and w.c.'s, Boiler and Hot-Water Tanks should all 
be grouped together or one above another to secure a minimum amount of plumbing. We should 
see that in all the Bedrooms there are good places for beds, mirrors, dressing-tables, and washstands. 
Every house should have, at any rate, one really good room, but the limit of cost precluded the possi- 
bility of quite so good a room as would be wished for, as two rooms had to be provided. The 
suggestion is made that by means of folding doors the two may be turned into one, and it is anticipated 
that the occupant of the house will generally use two rooms as one, only closing off one from the 
other when it is desired to have the study shut off for quiet or for visitors. 



REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 240. 

Architect : — Reginald T. Longden. 

Builders • .--^-W '. Moss & Sons. 

THIS house is erected at the angle of Reed 
Pond Walk, and will enjoy the view looking 
over the charming Plantation and Green. 

Every endeavour has been made to take 

advantage of these points in the massing of 

the salient features of the exterior to give an 

old-world charm, and to suit the house to its 

ideal situation. 

The accommodation consists of two roomy Sitting; Rooms and Hall, well-arranged Kitchen offices, 

four good Bedrooms grouped round central Landing, Bathroom and w.c. separately arranged, and 

linen and box storage. 




S35J! 



1 1 8 

The cost has necessarily been a 
factor in the treatment, but the effect 
of colour and texture in the materials 
used have been considered to best meet 
the conditions of such surroundings as 
Gidea Park. 

The exterior sand-faced bricks and 
tiles are of varied colours, the windows 
of leaded lights, and all the woodwork stained brown. 

The interior is broadly treated with open beams and rafters, grates of an old type, walls of plaster 
left from the wood float, and stained and wax polished woodwork. 







REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 241. 
Architect : — Edwin Gunn, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builder : — F. W. Jarvis. 

THIS house has been designed to suit the needs of the 
typical suburban family keeping one servant. The square 
type of plan is adopted as the most economical in cost and 
maintenance and useless passages and lobbies have been 
eliminated, the object being that every inch of enclosed space 
should be disposed where it will most avail, and avail most often. 
The large Living Room is the chief feature, a second room — the 
Parlour — being in ordinary circumstances of occasional use only. 



Owing to the increased use of 
laundries it is considered that the 
provision of a copper is not war- 
ranted by the frequency of its use, 
and the Scullery is treated more as an ante-room to the Kitchen than 
as the primitive " wash-house." The square plan makes a lofty Roof, 
and the fourth Bedroom is contrived to utilise the space thus given, per- 
mitting the three rooms on the First Floor to be of ample size. 

The construction is by ordinary methods as far as possible, but the 
attempt is made to reduce expenses of up-keep by avoiding unnecessary 
exposure of timbers. The walls are of brickwork, with 2|" cavity, lime- 
whitened externally, the. entrance and chimney stacks being faced with red 
sand-faced bricks and tiles. The Roofs are covered with Willesden paper, 
boarding, and sand-faced tiles. 

The Ground Floor generally is laid with grooved and tongued boarding in 
narrow widths, the Scullery being paved with tile quarries. All fireplaces 
are on internal walls. 

In the architectural design the unifying effect of the simple main Roof has been as little disturbed 
as possible. 

REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 242. 

Architect: — Ernest G. Theakston, lic.r.i.b.a. Builder : — F. W. Jarvis. 

\HE special aim of the planner has been to give as much space as possible for the Living 




J7T/C P//W 



T! 



Rooms without unduly cramping the general offices. 
Room No. 1 is arranged as the general Living Room, with south-east aspect and an area of 
about 228 square feet. 



1 19. 




Room No. 2, where the meals would be served, is of a 
size and shape that allows comfortable dining space for six or 
eight people without overcrowding. 

In the arrangement of these rooms care has been exercised in 
the following points — viz. : 

1. To place the fireplaces in a central position in the 
rooms, and on an internal wall, so as to ensure the maximum 
amount of heat being utilised. 

2. To arrange the positions of doors and fireplaces in 
proper relation to one another, so that the fire is screened 
from draughts. 

3. The provision in the Living Room of a recessed position 
for the fireplace and a bay recess adds to the general comfort 
of this room both in winter and summer. 

The Kitchen and Scullery is planned practically as one 
room, the Scullery forming a recess for washing up, etc. 

The Bedrooms are all of good size, and are planned with more 
length than breadth, as this arrangement is more economical 
and convenient for the disposal of furniture. 



Plenty of cupboard space is provided through- 
out the house. 

All the rooms are amply lighted. The 
modern tendency to overdo the window space, 
causing the rooms to be " wind-swept " and 
" sun-parched," has been carefully avoided. 

Local materials, brick and tiles, have been 
used for the exterior, and a simple, broad 
treatment of the elevations, relying on good 
proportions and the colour and texture of the 
materials used, has been relied on for effect. 






REED POND WALK. Class I. 
Architects : — Gripper & Stevenson. 
Builder : — A. Harris. 



No. 243. 



THIS House has been planned with an eye to producing a 
good square and compact building. The two principal' 
Bedrooms and the Sitting Rooms face the sunny aspect,, 
the Kitchen premises towards the north. Attention is directed 
to the door shutting off the whole of the domestic offices, and 
to the Larder being well away from the w.c. and the heat of the 
Kitchen. 





120 

Built in brindled brick with tile courses, red tile roof, and simple chimneys, all freaks and eccentricities 
have been purposeiy avoided. 

REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 244. 

Architect : — Clough Williams-Ellis. Builders : — Allen Bros. 

THE plan is that of a plain rectangle, having no excrescences or breaks of any description , 
ensuring a high ratio between the floor area and the length of the external walling. 
The house is economically roofed with tile slopes, capped by a flat-decked Roof, only sufficient 
space being left between this flat and the ceiling joists to provide adequate insulation from exterior 
heat and cold, and to accommodate the cistern, which is conveniently got at by a roof-trap imme- 
diately over it. 




The plumbing is all concentrated in one corner of the house, reducing the necessary service and 
waste pipes to their lowest possible terms, advantage being taken of the hot-water cylinder as a warmer 
and airer to the linen closet off the landing, while a section of the circulation pipe is used as a 
towel-rail and warming radiator in the Bathroom adjoining. 





On the ground floor the centrally placed front door opens into a tiled Entrance Hall, immediately 
opposite an arched recess. The Lavatory and Kitchen quarters are approached through an inter- 
cepting Lobby provided with a ventilating window and double doors. 

The Drawing Room opens en suite through folding doors into the octagonal Dining Parlour, the 
latter being lighted by a large French window opening on to the Garden steps, and having an air- 
lock service hatch to the Kitchen, it also has a separate door off the Hall direct, and two large corner 
cupboards reaching from floor to ceiling. 



121 

The space under the stairs provides good luggage room, while besides the recess in the Hall, cloak 
room is provided for in the Lobby and the Lavatory. 

The Kitchen is provided with a Scullery recess, while the garden window end forms a comfortable 
sitting bay for the servants. 

On the Bedroom Floor the centrally placed landing is lighted by a cupola skylight. 

Each Bedroom is provided with a good hanging cupboard, and the largest room has a door between 
it and the smallest, enabling the latter to be used as a Dressing Room. 

Where there is a young family a " nursery suite " is conveniently contrived from Rooms I and 4 
by placing a door so as to form an intercommunicating lobby between them. 

The exterior walls are " 11" cavity," the outer skin being of dove grey, hand-made bricks divided 
into panels by red brick flush-pilasters, that also form the borders to the sash windows. 

Downstairs these last open on spring friction rollers instead of with weights and pulleys, while 
upstairs a special design of spring hopper movement is employed, permitting thorough ventilation 
without draught. The fittings are of the simplest pattern, and there is not one scrap of metal to be 
polished, the bath taps, etc., being white enamelled. 

The Roof slopes are of hand-made wing-tiles to a steep pitch, and the chimneys of 2" hand-made 
bricks with stone caps. 

The flat Roof and Dormers are covered with " Permanite." 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 245. 

Architects : — Buckland & Farmer. Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 

THIS house is planned to combine comfort with convenience. 
The Reception Rooms are so arranged that the possibility of draughts in the neighbourhood 
of the fireplaces is reduced to a minimum. 





FIRST FIOOR FLW 



A way into the Garden from a small porch under the stairs is a feature which would prove a con- 
venience, especially as storage accommodation would also be available in the same place for a 
perambulator, for which a convenient place is often unprovided in a small house. The recess for 
hats and coats in the Hall would be heated by the hot-water circulating pipes. 

A comparatively large Hall and Landing, with adequate windows for light and ventilation, provide 
good lungs to the house, and the Bathroom, which is a large one, could conveniently be used as a 
Dressing Room. A good Drying Room, accessible from both Bathroom and Landing, should make 
an appeal to an appreciative housewife. 

For perspective drawing see No. 246. 



122 




mun hii'if'Tfrn 



REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 246. 

Architects : — Buckland & Farmer. 

Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 

MAXIMUM space at minimum cost is the 
keynote of this plan. These are achieved 
by simplicity of arrangement. 

The doors in the Reception Rooms are placed to screen the fireplaces from draughts, and in 
the Bedrooms so as to enable bed to stand against an inside wall. 




g |lOBBYi |TRAII&S 

tNTIf-ANCt 

'8 




£NT!U\NC£j 



REED POND WALK. Class II. No. 248 
Architect : — Reginald T. Longden. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



THE plan is of an entirely new type, based 
upon the needs of a family desiring large 
Kitchen space, a separate Study or Meals Room, 
and a room to be used purely as a Sitting 
Room. 

The latter overlooks the Green, while the 
Meals Room, adjacent to Kitchen for ready 
service, is also a Sitting Room Hall of ample 
dimensions. 




123 

In the Kitchen offices, however, an unusual 
departure is made, as by the use of a folding 
screen between Kitchen and Scullery the latter may 
be either separated for household laundry work or 
added to the Kitchen, leaving a recess in which the 
washing copper, " mangle," and the rougher 
requisites may be housed. 

The door of screen, which normally gives access 
from Kitchen to Scullery, also answers this purpose 
to recess. 

Three Bedrooms are provided, together with a 
cot recess off one of the latter. There are also a Bathroom, linen cupboard, w.c, and box store. 

The exterior is of varied colour hand-made bricks up to first floor and in gables, and the higher 
portions are within a mansard roof of hand-made tiling. 

The interior is simply but broadly treated with recessed fireplaces of bricks and tiles, open rafter 
ceilings, and woodwork of a rich brown colour beeswaxed, and plaster finished from plain wood float 
and coloured. 





grownd u_ /cun. Jvv_ J/oor jT/cuz. 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 249. 
Architects : — Newton & Youngman. 
Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 



THE house contains two Reception Rooms, with 
large bay window in the Dining-Room. The 



Drawing-Room is so arranged that at any time, with 
slight alteration, folding doors could be put in, and the 
Lounge Hall and Drawing-Room could then be converted 
into one large room. 
The main entrance is at the side, with w.c. and Lavatory at entrance. 

On the First Floor there are four Bedrooms, Bathroom, w.c, and Linen Cupboard, the landing 
being so arranged as not to occupy more space than necessary. 

The exterior is built with red facing bricks up to the sill of the Ground Floor windows, and the 
chimney stacks are built with facing bricks, the remaining portion being finished with rough-cast. 

The roof is covered with light red tiles. 






The whole of the woodwork is painted a dark moss green, including stack pipes, eaves, gutters, etc., 
which stands out in good contrast to the rough-cast. 

The interior joinery is kept very simple, all architraves, etc., being quite plain. The Dining-Room 
and Hall have been finished with " Solignum." The remaining woodwork painted white throughout. 

1 2 



I2 4 




REED POND WALK. 

Class T. No. 251. 

Architect : — E. Smith Coldwell, 
a.r.i.b.a. 

Builder : — W. Hunnable. 

THIS house, situate on the north side of the 
Reed Pond Walk, and overlooking the 
gardens which occupy the site of the old reed 
pond, is treated externally with rough-cast above 
a plinth of red sand-faced bricks of good colour 
and varied texture. The Roof is of sand-faced 
tiles of a sombre red. 

The principle underlying the design is sim- 
plicity of treatment and the obtaining of the 
maximum of accommodation for the money 
expended. 

The house contains a small self-contained 
Entrance Hall, 9' by 8', with fireplace and with 
a flooring of oak parquet, the room doors being 
off a separate lobby. The Staircase, treated 
economically but effectively, is on the right of 
this Hall. The Drawing Room, 13' 6" by 11' 6", 

is in the front of the house, the Dining Room, 15' 6" by 11' 6" at the back, with French casements 
to the Garden. The Kitchen accommodation is of a size suitable to a house of this type. 

On the first floor there are four Bedrooms, 12' 6" by 11', 8' 6" by 11', 8' by 9' 6", and 10' by 
7' 6". Great attention has been paid to the avoidance of bulkheads in these rooms, the two principal 
Bedrooms having none, and the two remaining ones having the minimum possible. 

The Bathroom has a dado of Opalite tiling. 

Advantage has been taken of the space below the bottom shelf of the linen cupboard to form a 
box enclosure with double doors for access. 

The house is wired for electric light in addition to the gas, which is laid on. 

Externally the woodwork is white painted, and internally is finished with white enamel to the Sitting 
and Bed Rooms, while the Hall is treated to resemble oak, the Kitchen premises being green painted. 

The mantelpieces throughout are specially designed by the architect. 






REED POND WALK. Class I. 
Architect : — John H. Curry, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 



No. 252. 



THE house contains two Reception Rooms, one facing south 
and the street, the other the garden, with door into it. 
The Living Room is a roomy, comfortable apartment. Both 
rooms open out of a separate Hall, with staircase. The 
Kitchen door also opens from the Hall, and is conveniently 
near the Dining Room. Fireplaces on inside walls are arranged 
to need only two chimney-stacks. All the Bedrooms are on 
First Floor. 



I2 5 

The Bathroom and w.c, on First Floor, are 
over the Kitchen and Scullery, and a Linen 
Cupboard is provided with hot-water tank 
inside. 

There is a separate Larder and Pantry, and 
abundance of cupboards. The plan secures as 
much sun as possible in both Reception Rooms 
and Bedrooms. 

The outside walls are 9" solid, covered with 
rough-cast. 

The windows are wood casements with 
occasional transomes. External woodwork painted white, gutters and down pipes tarred black. 

The joinery in Hall Staircase and Living Rooms is of selected pine and stained a pale oak stain 
(oil) and oil to obtain a dull polish. 

The Ground Floor is of tongued boarding. All ceilings are plastered, and all rooms have picture- 
rails. All ceilings and friezes are left white, and walls of Reception Rooms white. Remaining walls 
coloured with distemper. 

There is space in Roof for storage and boxes. 






REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 253. 
Not in competition. 
Builders : — Vail & Shore. 



TJ 



glazed partition, Kitchen (close to Dining Room, 
and copper, and the usual offices, including cycl 
On the Upper Floor there are four large, well- 
lighted and airy Bedrooms, Bathroom and 
Lavatory (hot and cold), etc., etc., with 
heated linen cupboard. The Staircase and 
Landing are all well lighted, all habitable 
rooms have fireplaces, and all drains are out- 
side house. The elevations are of a simple 
character, having a red brick plinth to ground 
floor level, with brick walls rough-casted above 
and a brick dentil course at the level of the 
heads of ground floor windows. The Roofs 
are covered with dark red tiles, and the chim- 
ney stacks are in red brick with rough-casted 
caps. The front entrance door is of oak. 



HE ground floor accommodation of this 
house comprises two very large Reception 
Rooms, separated from one another by a 
folding partition, which, when thrown open, 
gives a room 16' wide by 26' in length. A 
large Hall, with cloak space screened off by 
but quite shut off from same), Scullery, with sink 
e store under stairs, entered from the side way. 





126 

REED POND WALK. 

Class I. No. 254. 

Architect: — T. E. Eccles, f.r.i.b.a. 

Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 

IN this House the following points should be 
noticed : — 
Window bottoms to principal rooms formed in 
glazed tiles in order to form a Sanitary and 
Washable stand for flower pots. 

Staircase has been placed so as to form a 
convenient cupboard near front door for Bicycle 
or Perambulator. 

The main block of the house has been roofed 
with a single span roof, carried right down on 
garden side, to form roof of Verandah, the space in roof of Verandah below line of wall plate being 
utilised as cupboards. 

All Sinks, Lavatories, Bath and Airing Closet are placed close to Kitchen Range, and on run of 
hot water circulating pipe, in order : 

(a) To use as little pipe as possible. 

(b) To get a quick service of hot water. 

The hot and cold water pipes are run alongside each other to prevent the cold pipes freezing up. 
All joinery, such as doors, windows, etc., kept as simple as possible. 

Living Room Fireplace formed in the Ravenshead bricks, wood mantelshelf being carried on projecting 
brick headers. 





The special advantages or points of merit claimed for the design are : 
Large Living Room extending full depth of house, with Verandah leading out of same. 
Kitchen, Scullery, Larder on coolest side of house. 
Separate Washhouse, with portable boiler. 
Back Entrance under cover. 

As few mouldings used as possible, to avoid harbouring of dust and dirt. 

Gardens properly laid out into a definite scheme, a feature being made of the Rose Pergola leading 
from Reed Pond Walk to the front door. 



127 



REED POND WALK. Class I. No. 255. 
Architect : — Herbert A. Welch, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — Henry Lovatt, Ltd. 




THE architect has aimed at providing a convenient and " livable " house, not exactly a " Cottage " 
in the strict sense of the word ; but, on the other hand, not a pretentious dwelling. The Sitting 
Rooms and Hall are of good size, and the Living Room should have additional interest owing to the 
provision of a seat in the recess next to the fireplace. The Kitchen and Scullery are of good size and 
conveniently placed, as are all the domestic arrangements, being all under cover and close at hand. 
A space for garden tools has been arranged. 

On the First Floor four good Bedrooms are provided, as well as separate w.c. and Bathroom, and 
there are plenty of good cupboards. 

The materials are II" hollow walls of concrete blocks with rough-cast. 





128 



RISEBRIDGE ROAD. 



RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. No. 294. 
Architects : — Mauchlen & Weightman. 
Builder : — Isaac Bewley. 

IN this Cottage special attention has been given to the Living- 
Room. It is so planned that cooking can be carried on at 
one end without interfering with the general comfort of the room. 
Both this Room and the Parlour (which has a Separate Garden 
Entrance) have sunny aspects, and overlook the Flower Garden. 





The Scullery is carefully arranged for laundry work, and the bulk of the cooking could be done 
there at a gas stove. The w.c. and Coal space are conveniently placed off the open lobby. The 
Staircase from the roomy Hall leads to a compactly designed Bedroom Floor. All Bedrooms 
have fireplaces, the flues connecting up into one internal stack. Good cupboard accommodation 
is provided throughout. The idea aimed at with regard to the exterior was to obtain a cottage in 
appearance both restful and interesting. This effect has largely been gained by the simple 
unbroken roof and quiet gables. 

The materials used for the exterior are bricks of light but varying colour for walls, thick dark red 
hand-made tiles for roof. Windows, wood casement opening outwards and painted white. 



RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. No. 295. 

Architect: — T. D'Oyly Bulkeley. Builders: — H. Butcher & Son. 




GROUND FLOOR. HAN 





ERST HjOOE riA-U 



A tiew of the living room showing old- 
fashioned fireplace and settle. 




RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. 
Architect: — Edgar Bunce, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Son. 



129 
No. 296. 



THE Cottage has been planned with one large Living 
Room and a small Parlour or Study. The Living Room 
has an open Stove with ovens, which can be used as a range, 



■Jp 




1' nil 

1 LI vine ROOM 

.1 ...,. ^f 




-J is -| 


y^T] 


HALLj! \* 
|«PARlOUR 1 


XOAL 






so as not to disfigure the room with the usual type of range. The water is heated by means 
of a gas^ boiler, so that the Living Room fire need not be unnecessarily lighted. 

Three Bedrooms are provided on the First Floor, and each has a Cupboard. The Bathroom and 
w.c. are cut off by a Lobby, which helps to make these apartments more private. 

Dark tiles have been used for the Roof, with bright red tiles for the weather tiling, the Ground 
Floor being of stock bricks, with purple patches in them, giving a variegated colour to it. 

The woodwork is painted white, and the pipes and gutters, etc., a dark, dull green. 

The form of roof gives a good scale to the building, and at the same time provides plenty of room 
inside 



RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. No. 297. 
Architect: — Joseph Seddon, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builder : — John Long. 

THIS Cottage is planned to secure the maximum amount of 
sunlight in all rooms. 
The Hall is of such size and arrangement that one may 
welcome the coming and speed the parting guest without 
falling foul of hat stands, etc. 

The Bedrooms are of good size and beds are out of draughts. 






For the housewife there is provided an ample supply of cupboards. 

The materials of the exterior are Crowborough purple-brown bricks, with red dressings, white 
painted casements, with leaded lights, and red sand-faced tiles to roof. 



13° 

RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. No. 298. 
Architect : — E. R. Danford, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builder : — G. F. Sharman. 



T 



HE plan provides for a wide Hall, which is proposed to 
be floored with oak boarding, and this floor, after it has 






been well beeswaxed and rubbed, will make a good ground for rugs. 
The sanitary arrangements are planned on somewhat similar lines 
to those of the house designed by the architect in Class I., so as to 
minimise the length of hot water piping and the amount of plumber's 
work required. A good linen closet is provided. 
The materials and finishings are similar to those of the architect's house in Class I. 

The Entrance Porch will be faced with red and purple sand-faced bricks, and quoins with an arch 
over composed of similar bricks and roofing tiles arranged to design, a lead-covered hood being fixed 
between arch and porch. All iron spoutings are painted a dark green. In this design only three Bed- 
rooms were asked for, and it will be seen that two of these are of a good size, the other one, being smaller, 
would be suitable for a maid's room. 




prises a roomy 
Parlour and 
Kitchen Liv- 
ing Room, with ample Scullery, Laictei, and Cupboard 
accommodation on the Ground Floor. The w.c. is also on 
this level. On the First Floor are three good-sized Bedrooms, 
with Bathroom, having bath and lavatory basin with hot 
and cold water laid on to each. 

The house is finished externally in red bricks and rough- 
cast, with tiled roof. The design has been carefully considered 



RISEBRIDGE ROAD. 

Class II. No. 299. 
Architect : — Harry E. Rider. 
Builders : — W. J. Fryer & Co. 

THE House has been carefully planned with a view 
to internal comfort, and maximum accommodation 
at a minimum cost, consistent only with the best 
materials and workmanship. As will be seen from the 
plans, it com- 

& 





A* 




and is quiet and restful. The whole of the drainage and sanitary work are of the most modern type, 
and the house should prove healthy to live in and economical in upkeep. 

RISEBRIDGE ROAD. No. 300. Not in competition. 

Architect: — Charles Spooner, f.r.i.b.a. (Messrs. Spooner & Caulfield). 

Builders : — Dowsing & Davis. 

S the house faces 
^north-west, the ar- 
chitect has placed the 
chief Living Room with a 
south-east and south- 
west aspect, each window 
has an external sun shut- 
ter. A good larder and 
cupboard open out of the 
Kitchen on one side, and 
the Scullery on the other. 
The Parlour has a bay 
window, which will catch 
the afternoon sun, and 
another good cupboard opens out of it. The Bathroom is over the porch, 
and is reached from the landing three steps below the bedroom floor. There 
are three good Bedrooms, with a cupboard opening out of each, and each has 
a fireplace. The minimum space is occupied by passages and staircase. 

The house is built of brick, rough-cast, the latter being well brushed in with 
a brick broom, which, in addition to working the plaster well into the walls, 

has a very nice effect. The colour is cream. The roof covered with red sand-faced tiles, and the 
chimney of red or brindled brick The shutters are painted green, the windows and door frames 
white, and the doors very dark green, gutters and pipes black. 



FIRST FLOOR PLAN 




GROUND FLOOR PLJ.N 




RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. 
Architect : — H. S. East, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Sons. 



No. 



301 



THIS Cottage is so arranged that the household work is 
reduced to a minimum, and planned so that a servant can 
be kept if desired. The Living Room is large and well shaped, 
and the Ground Floor also has a roomy Hall, small Parlour, 
Kitchen, Scullery, and usual offices, conveniently placed in 
relation to both 
Living Room and 
^ .; .#----:.: ; .,_ gs-a Kitchen - Scullery. 

^WiSMW=iMmtti Upstairs there are 

three good Bed- 
rooms, Bathroom, 
linen and other cup- 
boards. The w.c. is 
entered from the 
stair landing, and is 
well screened from 
the Hall. 
The exterior is very simply treated, the walls being faced with mottled red bricks, with darker bricks 
forming the quoins, diapers, etc., and roof covered with dark red tiles The rooms all face either the 
garden or the road. The fireplaces arranged in the centre of the house, and the external walls built 
hollow 






^Ls. 



132 

RISEBRIDGE ROAD. 

Class II. No. 302. 

Architect ; — Charles W. Yates. 

Builders : —W. Butcher & Sons. 

IN planning this cottage two main considera- 
tions were kept in mind : First, to adopt 
a type of plan which would not necessitate a 
plot ..of land with a wide frontage, and thus 
avoid overburdening the building with a 
disproportionate cost of land ; and, second, to 
provide in the plan the maximum amount of 

efficient room space. It was felt that the sizes of the building did not justify the wasting of space in 
ingle nooks, large hall, etc., however desirable such things might be in a bigger house. 

The plans have accordingly been kept perfectly simple and the space utilised to the utmost. 
A large Sitting Room and a good-sized Living Kitchen are provided, while the placing of the range 
in the Scullery enables the Kitchen to be used as a Dining Room without the discomfort of the 
presence of the range. The Living Kitchen is provided with a special stove, which has an oven 
combined with it, enabling cooking, etc., to be done there when the range is not required to be used. 

There is a little slope in the ceilings of the Bedrooms, but 
only on some of the walls. Cupboards are provided in all 
Bedrooms. 

The great advance made in recent years in the use of gas 
for household purposes has been taken advantage of, and 
gas has been installed both for cooking and heating, in 
addition to, and as an auxiliary to, the coal fire. 

As regards the elevations, simplicity is the keynote. The 
walls are covered with rough-cast, the roofs are boarded and 
covered with hand-made tiles, and the effect is left to 
simplicity and proportion. 

RISEBRIDGE ROAD. 

Class II. No. 304. 

Architect : — A. Reynolds Chard. 

Builder: — R. J. Truscott. 

THE following are the chief features claimed by 
the architect : 
A cottage combining good planning and sound and 
economical building with artistic expression. 

Provision has been made on the Ground Floor for 
a Larder, Coals Store, Store Cupboard, and China 
Cupboard, and a combined Kitchen and Scullery, and 
careful attention has been given to the plan to economise labour from a domestic point of view. 

The external walls are constructed of 9" solid brickwork 
cement rendered and rough-cast, with internal walls of 4J" 
brickwork. 

The Roof is boarded and tiled. The gables in elevations 
are weather-tiled with best red tiles. 

Care has been taken to secure in the sanitary fittings and 
plumbing work an effective system carried out in the best 
materials and workmanship. 

The stoves are of a modern fuel-saving type. 








n 




RISEBRIDGE ROAD. 

Class II. No. 305. 
Architect : — Frank Sherrin. 
Builders: — J. Brown & Son. 

SIMPLICITY of construction and de- 
sign both outside and in is the keynote 
of this cottage, the aim being to give 
the maximum of floor space at minimum 
cost. 

The Ground Floor rooms are of good 
size, and in the Entrance Hall a space 
for a perambulator is provided. 

The principal Living Room has French 
casements, forming a garden entrance. 

There is good storage accommodation, 
and there is a large hot linen cupboard. 
room immediately over the kitchen. 

In the selection of external materials economy in upkeep has been considered. The outer walls are 
hollow, and faced with hand-made sand-faced red bricks. No whitewashing required every year. All 

sills and drips are formed with tiles, keeping the outside- 
painting at a minimum. 

Attention is drawn to the fact that the Kitchen department 
and the Bathroom and consequently all unsightly plumbing 
and pipes are kept upon the side of the house, thus leaving 
the Garden front free with a large blank surface of wall, which 
it is suggested might be utilised by the erection of a conserva- 
tory ; or an awning — forming the cheapest kind of verandah — 
might be put in summer time. 

A cordial invitation to the visitor to enter is to be noted 
upon the plastered soffit of the Entrance Porch. 



^jj^wsass****"*- 



On the First Floor is a Boxroom, entered from landing,. 
A good supply of hot water is insured by placing the Bath- 





RISEBRIDGE ROAD. 
Class I. No. 309. 
Architect: — F. Osler, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — H. Butcher & Son. 

IN planning this house the architect has en- 
deavoured to meet the demand for one large 
Living Room that shall be well lighted both 
morning and afternoon, and for a smaller room 
for meals, that can be easily served from the 
Kitchen. Four good Bedrooms are provided 
on the First Floor, with a Bathroom and 
Lavatory. 




J 34 




Bf D ROOM PIJH 



Externally the house is 
treated in quiet-coloured 
bricks, with tile hanging, and 
high, tiled roof, the roof f of 
the south side being brought 
down to the Living Room 
windows to form a small 
verandah, which communicates 
with the Meal Room. 




PLAN Or GROUND FLOOR 



RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class I. No. 310. 

Architect: — H. T. B. Spencer, a.r.i.b.a. Builders: — W. Moss & Sons. 

THE intention of the author of this design has been to provide an easily workable but com- 
modious house for a family of six or seven persons, with one servant, a special feature being 
the large Living Room for general use. All the rooms have a sunny aspect, and the Living Room 
gets both the morning and evening sun. 





RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class I. No. 312. 
Architect: — E. R. Danford, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builder : — G. F. Sharman. 



t: 



*HE principal entrance is placed at the side, as by this 
means the maximum amount of light is obtained to the 
chief rooms. The larder is well ventilated, and has a separate 
entrance, instead of one leading out of the Scullery or Kitchen. 
The Kitchen range is well lit from the side. Most of the fire- 
places are placed on inner walls, in order that the flues may be 
kept warmer and be less liable to smoke. The upstairs w.c, 
Bath, and Lavatory are placed over the Scullery, the wastes 
from such fittings being connected to the main drain at prac- 
tically one point, and the plumber's work reduced to a minimum. 
The Bath, &c, also being near kitchen range the length of hot 
water piping is reduced to a minimum. 

The outer walls are built hollow (thus ensuring a dry house), 
finished to a chalk white tint, with crouch lime mixed with 
Russian fat, the plinth being tarred to a height of i' above 
ground floor level. 

The chimney-stacks are faced with sand-faced bricks of varying shades of red and purple. All windows 
are casement lights, with portions made to open, and all exterior woodwork is stained with dark brown 
Solignum, which acts as a preservative, and is inexpensive to renew. 



l 35 

Internally, all woodwork is painted, except 
Kitchen, Scullery, w.c, and Coals, which will 
be finished with Solignum. Picture rails are 
provided in all the principal rooms, some of 
these have a shelf on top for placing china, 
etc. 

It is proposed to face the wall of Scullery to 
a height of about 4' with teapot brown salt 
glazed bricks to form a dado, and to put glazed 
tiles above each tier of shelves in larder. It is 
also proposed to have a dado about 4' high 
of glazed tiles to Bathroom and w.c. on first 
floor. 

The general effect aimed at has been to 

secure a country cottage in appearance ; or, in 

, , otner words, to get away from the usual type 

of the speculating builder's "desirable villa residence," and if a self-clinging creeper is grown 

on the walls, the effect of the white walls peeping out between the masses of creeper will be very 

attractive. y 





RISEBRIDGE ROAD. 

Class II. No. 3 14. 

Architect : — Walter Gray Ross, 

A.R.I.B.A. 

Builders : — G. E. Hough & Co. 



IN planning a little cottage of this kind, 
where strict economy has to rule, but at 
the same time it is desired to make the first 

impression as pleasing as possible, there is a great temptation to take the stairs up from 
the Living-Room. This arrangement lends itself to artistic treatment, and the Living-Room can be 
made into a sort of Lounge Hall, very effective and useful in an Exhibition cottage, but draughty 
and uncomfortable in everyday use. 

From a practical point of view it is better for the stairs from Bedrooms to communicate with the 
Scullerv, and this arrangement has therefore been adopted. 

The Living-Room and Parlour are both interesting, with their recessed window seats and specially 

designed fireplaces. The brick fireplaces in 
Bedrooms are substantial, and give a homely and 
comfortable air to the rooms, while they are capable 
of giving very ample heat, and are most economical 
in use. 

The materials used externally are red tiles, 
brindled bricks, and white rough-cast. The wood- 
work is stained dark oak. 




i 3 6 

RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. No. 316. 

Architects : — Gripper & Stevenson. Builder : — A. Harris. 

THIS house is planned to give a Kitchen, Scullery, and two large Sitting Rooms, the Dining 
Room having an open fire for cooking, if so desired. Upstairs three Bedrooms, Bathroom, and 
good accommodation for boxes. The " Glory-hole " is so often missing in small houses. 

Externally the Porch under roof forms a nice feature. 

For perspective drawing and plan see page 143, No. 1089. 



Class II. No. 317. 
Architect : — Norman Hick 

Mm®* 



Builders : — Butcher & Sons. 




THE cottage is designed with the idea of saving frontage space, both the Parlour and Kitchen being 
entered from either the front or back lobbies, which saves a connecting passage and makes the 
entire width of the cottage available for room space. The Parlour, Kitchen, and two of the Bedrooms 
have windows facing almost due south. The larder and coals are entered from within, and there is 
separate accommodation provided for bicycles, with direct access from the garden. 





GROUND FLOOR PLAN 



FIRST FLOOR PLAN 



5* 



J 37 
RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. No. 319. 
Architect : — Robert F. Hodges, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — Henry Lovatt, Ltd. 

IN this plan the question of aspect has been considered by 
giving to the Reception Room more or less of sun during 
the whole of the daw 
The Kitchen during 
the morning, when 
fires are mostly needed, 
will be cool and free 
from sun. The Larder 
will be well ventilated, 
well lighted, and in a 
cool position. 

Convenience has 
been studied bv pro- 
viding in the Recep- 
tion Room a sideboard recess, and doors both from the Hall and the domestic side, giving separate 
entrance by means of the one and service communication bv means of the other ; and in the 
Kitchen the entire floor space of 12' by 10' 6" is left free by recessing the dresser. The provision 
of a China Pantry gives storage room for china and glass. 

On the Bedroom Floor the Hot-Air Closet, Store Closet, and cupboards will be useful for storage. 
The author has aimed at producing a compact and well-concentrated plan, placing the Bathroom, 
etc., immediately over the Kitchen Offices, and also at providing good passage room without waste 
and an easv Staircase without " winders." 





RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. 

Architect : — S. E. Tarrant. 
Builders ■ — Shepherd Bros. 

THE house is planned and finished with 
special attention to economy in upkeep. 

Externally, the walls are plastered, with the 
exception of the chimneys, which are built in 
bricks of varying shades of red. 

The Roof is of hand-made, sand-faced red 
tiles. 

Internally, everything is executed in the 
simplest possible manner, no paint is used on 
the woodwork, which is treated with Car- 
bolineum. 

Passages have been avoided in planning, as 
they mean extra labour in keeping clean, and 
are wasteful. All rooms, including four Bed- 
rooms, have fireplaces. 

The Living Room gets the sun all day, and all 
rooms are well but not overlighted. 

The house should be very inexpensive to 
maintain. 



No. 320. 






K 



i 3 * 

RISEBRIDGE ROAD. 

Class II. No. 32 1. 

Architects : — W. W. Scott Moncrieff 

& Grant, a.r.i.b.a. 
Builders: — W. F. Blay, Ltd. 

THE site on which this house is built has the 
exceptional advantage of maintaining a clear 
view over the surrounding country. For this class 
of house it has been deemed expedient to combine 
the Kitchen and Scullery in one room so that the 
space usually occupied by the Scullery may be 
devoted to extra size in Living Room and Parlour. 

The entrance is at the side, so that both the Living 
Room and Parlour may face south and obtain the 
maximum amount of sunshine. The rooms and 
staircase generally are well lighted. The internal 
mouldings have been kept as flat as possible, so as 
not to harbour dust and dirt. 

Ample storage accommodation has been provided, 
and internal convenience and fitments have been 
considered rather than a showy exterior, which has 
been kept as simple as possible. The walls are of 
hand-made, sand-faced bricks, and the Roof is covered 
with hand-made tiles of a pleasing tint. 

The construction is exceptionally sound throughout, and the joinery and fittings generally will bear 
the closest scrutiny. 

No pains have been spared to make this house as convenient and attractive as possible. 

Provision has been made for electric lighting, and gas is also laid on. 





RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. 

Architects : — Gripper & Stevenson. 
Builder : — A. Harris. 



No. 



322. 



A SIMPLE square House, with one central chimney stack, 
making for economy of space and conservation of warmth. 
The Kitchen Living-Room is comfortable, with room for a 
dining-table away from the heat of the fire. The Bedrooms of 
good size, and the Linen Cupboard ample. 

Externally, a red brick plinth and chimney, red-tiled roof, and 
the walls covered with cream fine-cast. 





RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. No. 324. 

Architect : — G. Gordon Samson. Builders : — Vail & Shore. 

THIS house contains : On the Ground Floor, two Parlours, an Entrance Hall, Kitchen, Washhouse, 
Scullery, Larder, Coal Store, and w.c. ; while on the first floor there are three Bedrooms, a Bath- 



room, Lavatory, and w.c. 




139 

A Linen Cupboard is provided on the half landing. One of the Parlours is 
divided from the Hall by sliding panels, permitting the two apart- 
ments to be turned 
into one at will, the 
fireplace then re- 
maining in a large 
ingle nook which 
well screens the rest 
of the room from 
the front door. The 
materials employed 
externally are red 
brick and rough- 
cast. 




C&ou/vo fapOK 



RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. 

Architects : — Bamford & Aitken. 
Builders : — Y. T. Lovell & Son. 



No. 326. 






RISEBRIDGE ROAD. Class II. No. 
Architect: — J. Myrtle Smith, a.r.i.b.a. 



3 2 7- 
Builder: — P. R. Paul. 



THE plan aims at economy and compactness, and careful con- 
sideration has been given to the suitability of the fittings from 
the housewife's point of view, so as to reduce work to a minimum. 

The walls are built of brick, coated with rough-cast and tinted 
with limewash. 

The building is 
seated upon a base 
of dark red bricks 
of broken colour, 
and the chimney 
stacks are also in 
red bricks with wide 
white joints. 

The Roofs are 
covered with dark 
red sand-faced tiles. 

The Windows are casements, opening outwards, divided by wooden sash-bars. 

The floors are in boarding, narrow widths, the boards in the principal rooms being stained. The 
floors of Kitchen and Larder are in square red tiles. 

The internal walls are plastered and distempered, and all the woodwork is painted. 
Ample cupboard accommodation is provided ; a linen cupboard with heating arrangement, being 
provided in the Bathroom. 

The fireplaces will be of the " on-the-hearrh type," with tile hearths and surrounds. 





Ibtd/Varri). |j| 


{ &ahwiy&^£ 




s\n- Ox'ffdo/? 33' lorcE 











140 



SQUIRRELS' HEATH AVENUE. 



SQUIRRELS' HEATH AVENUE. Proposed Shopping Centre. 
Architects : — Fair & Myer, a.r.i.b.a. 



THE Bank premises, on the left of the drawing, are intended to be faced with hand-made Wrotham 
brindled stocks, with pilasters, cornices and general stonework in Portland, the roofs covered 
with variegated hand- made tiles. The corner block is finished with rough-cast, having slightly trowelled 
surface, the chimneys and exposed brickwork in Sussex brindled wood-burnt stocks, and the roofs 
covered with stained hand-made tiles. 

The tile-hung portion to be in slightly toned tiles, and the timber framing to be in oak with waney 
edges. 




Generally, the buildings are designed so that each block is complete in its own particular style of 
architecture, care being taken that no materials or style of later date is introduced than that upon 
which the design is based, so that when complete it requires but a few years to give it the appearance 
of a typical market place. 



SQUIRRELS' HEATH AVENUE. 
Class I. No. 1046. 
Architect: — E. Wilmott, f.r.i.b.a. 
Builders : — W. Moss & Son. 

IN this design the point to which importance has been attached 
is that there should be at least one good-sized sitting-room and 
one good-sized bedroom. A second equally serviceable sitting- 
room has been provided connected direct to the kitchen by a 
serving hatch so arranged in the door recess that the objections 
commonly incidental to these conveniences are avoided. 



141 






SQUIRRELS' HEATH AVENUE. 

Class I. Nos. 1047 &- io 4-8. 

Architect /—Ernest J. Mager, a.r.i.b.a. 

Builders : — J as. Smith & Sons, Ltd. 

IN planning these houses the object has been to utilise 
available space as fully as possible for the various rooms, 
keeping the arrangement as simple as possible so as to avoid 





waste spaces in corridors and passages. The Upper Floor rooms are kept clear of the Roof. 

Externally the houses are finished in rough-cast, distempered, the chimney-stacks being carried up 
in a dark facing brick, and finished with bright red chimney-pots. 

The Roofs are finished with a stout, hand-made local tile. 



SQUIRRELS' HEATH AVENUE. 

Nos. 1049 to io 54 ar >d Nos. 1068 to 1073. Not in Competition. 

Architects (associated) : — C. R. Ashbee, f.r.i.b.a., and Gripper & Stevenson. 

Builder : — R. Emmott. 

THIS is a group of houses with the road running through the centre. The four corner houses 
are on the ordinary building line, and the remainder set back some 20'. This arrangement, 
together with the brick arches joining the blocks, has been adopted in order to give the effect of 



142 




A 6<R0U1> Of TWf'lX'L fjOUS€S .'17 SQUMRfflJS II'IM M <RafWFORD. CMASmm MA anj 6M>PP£4i & STtVI •NSON Mrcl.itccls. Ml 



a quadrangle or square. The large piers at the corners and the setting back of the frontages in a sweep 
at either side were a natural sequence to the planning of the blocks, and tend to the unity and com- 
pleteness of the group. 

The elevations have purposely been kept quiet and restrained, brindled brick with brighter red 
quoins, cream painted casements and frames, and simple Roof lines assisting towards an unpretentious 
and restful effect, which is completed by the plain grass plots and boundary hedges behind the white 
painted posts and chains. 




<p£ 



rf^JS 1 A ^c 



mnr* 




Wmn w. a 



JirftC 




FIRST FLOOR PLANS 



□ w 

P^ 4 fnwr 



BLOCK PLAN 



The plans present no especial features beyond an endeavour to secure adequate light and through 
ventilation, particularly to the passages and staircases. Mention might also be made of the good 
cupboard accommodation and the high class of the porcelain enamelled Bath and w.c. fittings on the 
first floors. 

The Kitchen premises, being shut off by one door from the remainder of the house, ensures a minimum 
of noise and cookery smells. 



H3 




SQUIRRELS' HEATH AVENUE. 

Class II. No. 1089. 

Architects : — Gripper & Stevenson. 
Builder : — W. Emmott. 





THIS house is planned to give a Kitchen, Scullery, and two large Sitting Rooms, the Dining 
Room having an open fire for cooking, if so desired. Upstairs three Bedrooms, Bathroom, and 
good accommodation for boxes. The " Glory-hole " is so often missing in small houses. 

Externally the Porch under roof forms a nice feature. 



SQUIRRELS' HEATH AVENUE. Class I. No. 1090. 
Architects : — Gripper & Stevenson. Builder-: — W. Emmott. 



THE main points of the planning are the careful separation 
of the Kitchen premises from the rest of the house, good 
lighting to staircase and provision for through ventilation. 

By concentrating the Kitchen portion in a central wing! at 
the back, undue width of frontage is avoided. Attention is 
directed to the ample cupboard space upstairs. 

Externally, the house, built in red brindled brick with red 
tiled roof and double chimney stack, recalls the comfortable 
little houses built in the early eighteenth century. 






SQUIRRELS' HEATH AVENUE. 

Architects : — Gripper & Stevenson. 
Builder : — W. Emmott. 



A SQUARE house, relieved only by the Front Entrance, 
which, carried up to the roof, adds to the accommoda- 
tion by a useful little Dressing-Room. 

The door from the Hall cuts off the whole of the Kitchen 
premises, and through ventilation is obtainable from front to 
back door. The Scullery and Larder are both well away from 
the heat of the Kitchen. 



Class I. No. 1 09 1 






MEADWAY.-SPECIAL EXHIBIT. 





Not in competition. No. 267. 

Architect : — E. C. P. Monson, f.r.i.b.a., F.s.i.,etc, 
Finsbury Pavement House, London, E.C. 



/■Wf.-ir n.i>ore p/./x\: 



r;/so//\// n.iijtf /V.../M 



THIS Cottage is intended to be an example for Garden 
Cities, Model Villages, Municipal Housing, and is 
admirably suitable also as a Week-End Cottage. 

The Cottage can be built detached for about £275, 
including all fittings, drainage, fencing, etc., or in pairs at a 
reduced figure. 

The accommodation is : On the ground floor — Entrance 
Hall, Parlour, Living Room, Scullery, Bathroom, w.c, Larder 
and Coals. On the first floor — Well-lighted Landing and 
three Bedrooms. 

The Parlour has a large square bay window, and an 
additional feature of the Cottage is a separate Bathroom 
arranged on the ground floor, experience having proved that 
bathrooms cannot be provided on the first floor without adding 
materially to the cost, and too often at the saciifice of a 
bedroom, or at least the curtailing of one or more bedrooms. 

No bedrooms or living rooms have more than one door, 
and all the fireplaces are arranged economically and free 
from draught. 

The copper is heated by the kitchen fire and the boiler is 
accessible from the scullery. 



■4J 




LIST OF COM- 
PETITIONS AND 
PRIZES IN THE 
EXHIBITION AND 

THE NAMES OF 
THE JUDGES 




The Right- JHon. JOHN 
BURNS, President of the 
Local Government Board and 
President of the Exhibition 



Sir HERBERT RAPHAEL, 

Bart., M.P., Chairman of the 

Exhibition and Donor of the 

Prizes 



OPEN TO ARCHITECTS 

FIRST PRIZE 

CLASS I A Detached House, to cost £500 , . ... ... Gold Medal and £250 

CLASS II A Detached Cottage, to cost £375 ... ... ... Gold Medal and £200 

CLASS III For the best Internally Fitted House in Classes I or II ... ... £50 

CLASS IV A Town Plan of Gidea Park ... ... £100 

CLASS V A Garden Design for House or Cottage in Classes I or II ... ... £25 

CLASS VI A Perspective Drawing, suitable for reproduction, of a House or Cottage 

entered for Competition in Classes I or II ... ... ... £ iQ 

OPEN TO BUILDERS 



SECOND PRIZE 
^IOO 
£lOO 

£s° 

£s 



CLASS VII For excellence of Workmanship and Construction in the Erection of a 

House or Cottage in Classes I and II Gold Medal and £ 1 00 ... £50 

Judges : Guy Dawber, Esq. (Vice-President of the Royal Institute of British Architects), H. V. Lanchester, 
Esq., f.r.i.b.a. (Editor of the Builder), Mervyn Macartney, Esq., f.r.i.b.a. (Editor of the Architectural Review). 

CLASS VIII 

A special Class has been instituted for Wholly or Partly Furnished Houses, and a Gold and Silver Medal will 
be awarded at the discretion of the Judges, regard being had to the suitability and cost of the Furniture. 

Judges : Messrs. Charles Allom, Esq., E. W. Gimson, Esq., Halsey Ricardo, 
Fsq., f.r.i.b.a., Charles Spoonf.r, Esq., f.r.i.b.a. 

CLASS IX 

Improvements in Materials used in House Building — Tiles, Bricks, Partition 
Walls, Wall and Ceiling Coverings, etc., etc. 

Judges : Walter Cave, Esq., f.r.i.b.a., Laurence Weaver, Esq., f.s.a., 
F. Whitmore, Esq. (Architect to the Essex County Council). 

In this Class a Gold Medal and further awards will be given at the discretion of 
the Judges. 

CLASS X 

Improvements in Fittings used in House Building — Sanitary and Domestic 
Fittings, Baths, Stoves, Cooking Ranges, appliances connected with the Lighting and 
Heating of Houses, Door and Window Furniture and Fittings, Casement Blinds, etc., etc. 

Judge : Max Clarke, Esq., f.r.i.b.a. 

In this Class a Gold Medal and other awards will be given at the discretion 0/ 
the Judges. 

L 




Mr. Alderman THOMPSON, 
Chairman of the Exhibition 
Committee, and of the 
National Town Planning and 
Housing Council 



146 




THE OLD AND THE 

NEW 



THE INN IN HARE STREET, WHICH RUNS THROUGH THE 

GARDEN SUBURB, AND (BELOW) THE FIRST OF THE NEW 

HOUSES BUILT IN IT 



THE CENTRE HOUSE 
WITH HALF-TIMBERED 
PORCH (BUNNEY AND 
MAKINS, ARCHITECTS) 
IS THE HOUSE OF WHICH 
THE PRESIDENT OF THE 
LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

BOARD LAID THE 
FOUNDATION STONE ON 
JULY 28, iqio. THIS 
HOUSE AND THE CORNER 
HOUSE ADJOINING 

(T. M. WILSON, ARCHI- 
TE C T) HAVE BEEN 
FURNISHED FOR THE 
EXHIBITION BY MESSRS. 
OETZMANN & CO. 





BACK OF HEATH DRIVE AND ELM WALK. 



Our portraits of Dr. Alfred Russel Wallace, Sir Edward Poynter, Mrs. Despard, Mrs. Fawcett, Mr. E. F. Benson, Mr. Hall Caine, Mr. Walter Crane, Mr. Jerome K. 
Jerome, Mr. W. W. Jacobs, and Mr. McCurdy are by Elliott & Fry ; of Mr. Thomas Hardy, Sir Arthur Pinero, Sir Hiram Maxim, the Kev. the Hon. E. Lyttelton, Mr. 
A. C. Benson, and Mr. Benjamin Kidd, by Russell & Son ; of Mr. Eden Phillpotts by R. K. Durrant & Son ; of Mrs. Ayrton by Miss Kate Pragnell ; of Mr. Arnold 
Bennett by Caffyn : of Sir Frederick Treves and Mrs. Lane by Bassano ; and of " Home Counties " from a pencil drawing by Van Anroog. 



HARRISON GIBSON & CO. 

HOUSE FURNISHERS & REMOVAL CONTRACTORS 

GIDEA PARK is well within our Delivery Radius. In fact 
ours is the nearest House Furnishing Establish- 
ment. Immense Showrooms for Furniture, Carpets, 
Linoleums, Curtains, &c., &c. Completely Furnished 

Specimen Rooms. 

A big staff of skilled workmen who have been 
with us for years. In addition to our front- 
ages in the High Road, we have an Arcade 
112 feet long. Large Depositories for safe 

ire. Removals, own vans 

and men. 




A very large Stock of really Easy 
Chairs and Settees. 



storage of Furniture. 



ILFORD 



TELEPHONE 



47 ILFORD 




Reproduction of an Old 
English Mahogany Tall- 
boy Chest of Drawers. 



CALLENDER'S 

PURE BITUMEN 

DAMPCOURSE. 

Substitutes are often sug- 
gested. Specify "Callender's," 
and see that you get it. 

As the Original Inventors of 
Pure Bitumen Dampcourse we 
have all the advantages which 
accrue from long experience. 

CONFORMS FULLY TO BUILDING BY-LAWS. 
CHEAPER THAN SLATES & CEMENT. 

In all matters of Damp- 
coursing, quality and reliability 
will be ensured by the use 
of material manufactured by 

GEORGE M. CALLENDER & CO., LTD. 

Contractors to Admiralty, War Office, Office of Works, L.C.C., &c. 

VICTORIA STREET, S.W. 



masssmngggm magsan gg 




Have you considered the convenience 
of Dryad Furniture for furnishing the modern 
house ? How easily you can move it ; how the 
design harmonizes with the surroundings.and adds 
a dignity which only a furniture of style can give. 
EXHIBITING AT FESTIVAL OF EMPIRE 

[Stand 65 in the Crystal Palace] 
BeWare of imitations called "like Dryad," but 
always lacking Dryad style and workmanship. 

Book of designs for furnishing in cane post free 
DRYAD WORKS, 16 DEPT., LEICESTER 



A 

y 

\ 

\ 

y 

A 



A 
o 
A 

V 
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□ v#v* v#a.* v *-%.♦ x*-%*-v* , v*'%.* , %.*m»'%> , w%.*x.« □ 




OUR HOMES. 

THE NEW Book on Economical Furnishing, containing details and particulars 
of WARING'S four fully furnished Model Houses at £100, £200, £300 and 
£500, with many illustrations in colours and black and white. 



Kindly write for 

a scpy of 
" Our Homes." 




M 



'%''- 






ft 



Kindly write for 
a copy of 
Our Homes." 



1§»S£3! 







BRINGS 



Decorators and Furnishers to 
His Majesty King George. 



Near Oxford Circus, London, W. 



ll' t^-a** ^^-^ ^^ ^ 8 " 




Dining, Drawing and Best Bedroom of £300 House. 

YOU ARE SPECIALLY INVITED to Visit the four Model Houses, and the 
150 Specimen Rooms, Decorated and Furnished in all the favourite Period Styles. 
WARINGS are the Largest Retail Manufacturers of Furniture in the World, and 
to them belongs the unique distinction of having created a new note in Decoration 



vi 




'47 



HOW TO GET TO 
THE EXHIBITION 
BY RAIL & ROAD 



HUMPHREY REPTON'S COTTAGE 

SQUIRRELS' HEATH and Gidea Park, the new Station for the Exhibition and the Romford Garden 
Suburb, which, with its grass slopes and handsome appearance, presents as marked a contrast to 
the stations between Romford and Liverpool Street, as Gidea Park will present to the old suburbs of 
London, is on the Great Eastern main line to Colchester and the East Coast. It is 13 \ miles from 
the City, and the fastest trains do the journey in twenty-five minutes. 

> During June there will be reduced fares by a special non-stop train which will run through to 
Squirrels' Heath from Liverpool Street in twenty-three minutes, starting at 11.30 a.m. 







CITY TO 


SQUIRRELS' HEATH 
Weekdays. 


















a.m. 


a.m. 


a. m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 
s.o. 


a.m. 

N.S. 


p.m. 


Liverpool Street 

Fenchurch Street 

Squirrels' Heath and Gidea Park 


5 12 

5 58 


6 17 

7 3 


6 40 

6 20 

7 16 


7 30 

7 28 

8 20 


8 43 

8 35 

9 3° 


9 6 

8 50 

9 54 


9 55 

9 33 

10 38 


10 20 
10 12 
10 55 


10 58 

10 52 

11 49 


11 3° 
11 53 


11 36 

11 20 

12 19 


11 48 

12 35 


11 50 

12 38 


12 24 
1 16 




p.m. 
s.o. 


p.m. 

N.S. 


p.m. 
s.o. 


p.m. 

N.S. 


p.m. 
s.o. 


p.m. 

N.S. 


p.m. 
s.o. 


p.m. 

N.S. 


p.m. 
s.o. 


p.m. 
s.o. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 

N.S. 


Liverpool Street 

Fenchurch Street 

Squirrels' Heath and Gidea Park 


1 
1 25 


I 18 

1 14 

2 15 


1 20 

2 4 


1 39 

2 20 


1 55 

2 24 


2 O 
2 28 


2 3° 

3 6 


2 39 

2 20 

3 21 


2 43 

3 27 


3 32 

4 2 


3 28 

3 20 

4 16 


4 22 
4 13 
4 59 


5 3 

5 32 


5 20 

5 57 




Sf.S. 


N.S. 


s.o. 


s.o. 


N.S. 


s.o. 


N.S. 


N.S. 


s.o. 


N.S. 




N.S. 






Liverpool Street 

Fenchurch Street 

Squirrels' Heath]and Gidea Park 


5 37 

6 2 


5 4° 

5 34 

6 24 


5 43 

5 47 

6 31 


5 56 

6 48 


6 7 
6 31 


6 13 
6 5 
s.o. 


6 23 
6 4 
6 59 

N.S. 


6 35 

6 17 

7 13 


6 45 

6 42 

7 30 


7 5 

6 47 

7 39 


7 8 
7 50 


7 16 

7 5o 


7 38 

8 7 


7 47 

7 22 

8 27 


Liverpool Street 

Fenchurch Street 

Squirrels' Heath and Gidea Park 


8 22 

8 20 

9 12 


8 54 

9 21 


8 55 

9 44 


9 15 

9 20 

10 11 


9 54 

9 47 

10 42 


10 16 

11 I 


IO 34 

10 23 

11 II 


11 5 

10 52 

11 52 


11 35 

11 20 

12 24 


12 18 

11 55 

12 59 


12 30 
1 16 


— 


— 


— 




THE NEW STATION FOR GIDEA PARK 



148 

There are about seventy trains in the day from and to Liverpool Street and Fenchurch Street. 
The fares are the same from both : 



Single 
Return 



First. 


Second. 


Third. 


£ s. d. 


£ s - d - 


£ s. d. 


023 


019 


1 i\ 


036 


027 


1 g 



SQUIRRELS' HEATH TO CITY. 





a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


Squirrels' Heath and Gidea Park ... 


3 44 


5 4 6 


6 48 


7 25 


7 46 


7 5i 


8 7 


8 21 


8 38 


8 55 


9 17 


9 32 


ro 16 


Fenchurch Street 


— 


6 42 


7 44 


8 22 


8 39 


8 47 


9 4 


9 16 


— 


9 43 


10 15 


10 32 


11 14 


Liverpool Street 


4 33 


6 34 


7 31 


8 10 


8 30 


8 37 


8 39 


8 57 


9 4 


9 27 


9 4 6 


10 10 


10 52 




a.m. 


a.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 
N.S. 


p.m. 
s.o. 


p.m. 
s.o. 


p.m. 

N.S. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 
s.o. 


p.m. 

N.S. 


Squirrels' Heath and Gidea Park ... 


10 35 


11 5i 


12 14 


12 44 


12 48 


1 9 


1 9 


1 26 


2 21 


3 26 


4 16 


4 57 


5 8 


Fenchurch Street 


11 45 


12 40 


1 10 


1 40 


1 39 


2 13 


2 13 


2A28 


3 12 


4 24 


5 14 




6 5 


Liverpool Street 


n 18 


12 20 


1 6 


1 28 


1 38 


1 50 


1 56 


2 10 


3 8 


4 4 


5 


5 45 


5 52 




p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 








s.o. 




s.o. 


N.S. 


s.o. 


















Squirrels' Heath and Gidea Park ... 


6 5 


6 22 


6 44 


6 51 


7 17 


7 52 


8 25 


8 47 


9 43 


10 39 


11 10 


— 


— 


Fenchurch Street 


7 1 


7 29 


7 40 


7 59 


8 13 


8 45 


— 


9 43 


10 44 


11 40 


— 


— 


— 


Liverpool Street 


6 38 


7 8 


7 33 


7 28 


7 59 


8B35 


9 15 


9 28 


10 28 


n 29 


11 58 


— 


— 



SUNDAYS.— CITY TO SQUIRRELS' HEATH. 



Liverpool Street 

Fenchurch Street 

Squirrels' Heath and Gidea Park 



Liverpool Street 

Fenchurch Street 

Squirrels' Heath and Gidea Park 



a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


7 15 


9 22 


9 40 


9 50 


10 12 


10 38 


11 10 


11 45 


12 42 


1 1 


2 8 


— 


9 17 


— 


— 


10 20 


— 


10 45 


11 17 


— 


12 47 


1 47 


S 4 


10 8 


10 16 


10 31 


11 8 


11 35 


n 56 


12 31 


1 28 


1 48 


2 54 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


3 36 


4 32 


5 4 


15 


6 56 


7 5o 


8 43 


8 52 


10 5 


10 40 


11 10 


3 20 


4 22 


4 47 


5 47 


6 47 


7 33 


8 18 


8 47 


9 47 


10 17 


10 48 


4 23 


5 11 


5 50 


6 57 


7 42 


8 36 


9 12 


9 39 


10 44 


11 22 


11 56 



p.m. 

2 31 

3 27 



SQUIRRELS' HEATH TO CITY. 





a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


a.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


Squirrels' Heath and Gidea Park ... 


8 9 


9 8 


10 11 


i° 37 


11 15 


11 3 8 


12 3 


in 


1 56 


2 15 


Fenchurch Street 


9 14 


10 16 


11 12 


11 41 


12 13 


12 43 


1 13 


2 3 


3 16 


2 56 


Liverpool Street 


8 58 


10 3 


11 


11 25 


12 3 


12 25 


12 51 


1 59 


2 44 


2 55 




p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 


p.m. 






Squirrels' Heath and Gidea Park ... 


2 35 


3 4° 


4 52 


6 4 


7 4i 


8 39 


9 21 


10 11 


— 





Fenchurch Street 


3 4° 


4 43 


5 43 


7 13 


8 44 


9 3° 


10 9 


11 12 


— 


— 


Liverpool Street 


3 24 


4 29 


5 42 


6 52 


8 33 


9 33 


10 


11 4 





— 



(a) Fenchurch Street Saturdays only, (b) Arrives Saturday 8.42 p.m. (s.o.) Saturdays only, (n.s.) Not on Saturdays. 

(t) Thursdays only. 




BY ROAD. 

The motorist simply keeps straight on 

along the road the Romans travelled 

through Aldgate, Bow, Ilford, and 

Romford (Durolitum). 




GOLF CLUB HOUSE 



THROUGH THE TREES 



i 4 9 



THE ARK-ADIANS : A GARDEN SUBURB TRAGEDY 




From a drawing by David Wilson 



By the courtesy of "The Graphic' 



M 2 



ISO 



Refreshments 




EVERY ACCOMMODATION FOR 
LUNCHEONS, TEAS ftf DINNERS 
IS PROVIDED IN THE 

Exhibition ^ea 



H 



Balgores House, corner 
CJHoC^ °f Balgores Lane 



HERE ALSO ARE CLOAKROOMS 

AND LAVATORIES 



ADDENDA 



WILMER & SONS 



HEAD OFFICE : i i-i + Bury St., St. Mary Axe, E.C. 
Works : Bow Bridge Iron Foundry, Stratford, E. 
Branch : 119 Victoria St., Bristol. 




We have been honoured by 
the Royal Warrant or 
Appointment to His 
Majesty King George V. 



Specialists in Kitchen 
Ranges, Mantel Registers, 
Interiors and Tile Panels, 
also Porcelain Enamelled 
Baths, Lavatories, etc., etc. 



See 



our Exhibits in 
Gidea Hall. 




CHELMSFORD. 
Pattern Range has given 



[Copy] 
Dear Sirs, — "The 'Sine Qua Non' Vill 
ever}" satisfaction. 

"The 'Bond Stoves' are simply perfect and bear out all that has 
been said of their advantages. I am shortly building a larger house 
and you may relv upon me for procuring everything in this way from 
you. "Yours truly, (Signed) G. J. BOLINGBROKE." 

Messrs. Wilmer & Sons. 



" Sine Qua Non " Range (New Villa Pattern). 

[Copy] PETERBOROUGH. 

Dear Sirs, — " I am pleased to inform you the ' Sine Qua Non ' Range 
is a complete success. It is an extremely good cooker, and heats the 
water for bath, lavatory, etc., perfectly, and I am quite sure the 
consumption of coal is not half as much as that burnt by the old range. 
"Yours truly, {Signed) W.W.HARRIS."' 
Messrs. Wilmer & Sons. 



ILLUSTRATED PRICE LIST ON APPLICATION. 











FENCING AND ROOFING 




GEORGE BLAY 

NEW MALDEN-SURREY 


I Lil^iil IlUINli : J 1 \\J. KllMOa 1 \Ji\ 

CONTRACTOR for FENCING TO 

THE ROMFORD GARDEN SUBURB 


Most Extensive Stocky of Fencing Materials in the Country 


SEE EXHIBIT OF GATES, FENCING ftf ROOFING TILES 
IN GIDEA HALL, ROMFORD 









Vll 




THE elimination 'of jerry-built furniture is just as important for both 
appearance and comfort as the elimination of jerry-built houses. The 
illustrations on these two pages of the furniture in Messrs. Forbes & Tate's 
house (No. 20 1, Class 1) show how successfully this result has been attained by 
those well-known furniture craftsmen Messrs. Hindley & Wilkinson. 

Practical utility is, of course, the first requisite in furniture : elaborate decoration 
which serves no particular purpose is an unnecessary waste of space (and space in 
houses of this kind is a consideration) and, moreover, it is totally out of keeping 
with the character of simplicity which the house possesses. 

Let it not be thought, however, that this implies any lack of finish ; for with 
simple, appropriate design and carefully planned practical utility, Messrs. Hindley 
& Wilkinson have combined the perfection of workmanship which has made 
them famous. 

For their models they have gone to the best periods of furniture design and have 
reproduced these, not with the slavish imitation of the mere copyist, but with the 
artistic sense that takes the old for a motive and adapts it so that it becomes 
appropriate to the taste of to-day. 

In one particular, however, Messrs. Hindley & Wilkinson have not attempted 
to produce the effect of the antique. 

All collectors know that much of the charm of old furniture is found in its colour, 
and that colours can only be produced by the slow processes of age. Attempts are 
continually being made to achieve the same result by artificial means, but they have 
merely succeeded in giving the wood an obviously " faked " appearance. 

Oak treated with lime loses its nature ; the chocolate-coloured varnish sometimes 
applied to it gives it a tone that no genuine old oak ever possessed ; whilst the 



via 




process of fuming with ammonia finds favour with 
few but the surviving devotees of Part nouveau. 

No process has been devised to imitate the 
beautiful golden colour which age and decaying 
polish have imported to old walnut furniture. The 
faded colour of old mahogany is perhaps the only 
effect of time which can be imitated with any 
reasonable measure of success. 

The method adopted by Messrs. Hindley & 
Wilkinson in their reproductions, chiefly of the late 
eighteenth century, has been to choose woods 
which show a good figure and to allow the grain 
to appear through a transparent stain, finished 
with a clear polish. 

New Zeal and pine, for instance, possessing the 



brilliancy of satin-wood, is par- 
ticularly suitable for staining. 
Hare-wood has a peculiar charm 
when treated with a grey stain. 
The white shimmer of Syca- 
more looks well when finished 
with clear white polish or 
simply waxed. The bedrooms 
have been furnished in Bass- 
wood — a wood perhaps rather 
better known than the others. 
This method of treatment by 
transparent stains, carefully 





compounded to secure perma- 
nency, achieves a result more 
charming in its variety than can 
be produced by any other means, 
and of a simplicity entirely 
appropriate to the surroundings. 
It is interesting to see the old 
patterns of Chintz being repro- 
duced and used with such good 
effect in these rooms. There 
are, of course, many latter-day 
methods of production, but none 
can approach the original hand- 
block process. 



THE GARDEN SUBURB DEVELOPMENT 
COMPANY (HAMPSTEAD) LTD. BUILD 
HOUSES ADJOINING THE SLOPES 
OF • HAMPSTEAD • HEATH 



Architecture at the Hampstead Garden Suburb 

" Without this company (The Garden Suburb Development Company (Hampstead) 

" Limited) as part of the machinery for creating the suburb, it seems likely that 

" the brave hopes of the promoters would have sorely miscarried. At the start 

" some few plots were leased to single builders, with results that we need neither 

" describe nor illustrate. It was clear that there was a large chance of the labours 

" of the consulting architects, in planning the roads, open spaces, and building 

" sites, being smothered by an inharmonious jumble of unrelated designs, all, 

" perhaps, admirable in themselves. Between the Trust Company and the man 

" wanting to build there was need of a 

" buffer state. Some friends of the Trust 

" Company formed the Development 

" Company to fulfil this function. The 

" latter Company, by co-operating with 

" the consulting architects, is able to build 

" up groups of houses and create vistas 

" and street pictures which would other- 

" wise have been impossible. It employs 

" about a score of architects of high 

" repute to design for the willing pur- 

" chaser, or it will work with the 

" purchaser's architect, and it builds the 

" houses through an official contractor. 

" By this means the building trade is 

" removed from the sphere of speculation, 

" and the possibility of freak houses 

" which offend the landscape is destroyed." 



"COUNTRY LIFE." 

September 2$t/i, 1909. 



WHAT WE OFFER 

A choice of houses designed by the best architects, 
built under close expert supervision, at purely 
commercial prices. 

We build houses to suit your own requirements. 

We will co-operate with your own architect, if desired. 

In any case you are saved trouble, and expense. You 
have the advice of skilled surveyors at every stage of 
the transaction, and you obtain economies only 
possible where large quantities of houses are being 
built at once. 

In three years we have built for clients _£i 50,000 
worth of houses. We could not have done this 
unless we gave them satisfaction. 

When the plans for the house are settled, we quote 
a fixed inclusive price, and we arrange for payment 
by instalments if you prefer. 

We claim that our houses are better built, and cheaper 
to maintain, than any speculatively built houses, and 
thematerialsand workmanship can always be inspected 
by your own surveyor without notice at any time. 

We have hundreds of plans and illustrations of houses 
at our offices which you can inspect, and we are always 
happy to give any assistance or information to 
enquirers. 



33 HENRIETTA ST., COVENT GARDEN 

W.C. 



HOW TO BECOME A FREE- 
HOLDER IN GIDEA PARK. 

SINCE the Park was opened, in July, 1910, the sale of Plots, largely'due to the demand by Architects 
and Builders for themselves or their clients in connection with the House and Cottage Exhibition, has 
been of a striking character. 

When the Suburb was opened in July, 1910, one plot had been sold and one house of the value of 
^850 was in course of construction. At the beginning of the present year 153 Plots had been sold, and 
buildings to the value of ^63,000 were in course of erection. 

The fact that the bulk of these sales have been made to Architects and Builders — experts in the value 
of land near London — is a striking testimony to the nature of the bargain offered. In fact, the Estate is in 
many respects unique. The presence of the Romford Golf Links, secured for the benefit of residents on 
the Estate as open space for all time, gives the land exceptional value, and experts realise that it will be 
impossible to secure land as good anywhere within the same distance from the City when this is disposed of. 

SPECIAL OFFER -FOR THE SUMMER OF 1911. 

During the Summer of 191 1 the Directors of Gidea Park are offering plots on special terms to persons 
desiring to secure an interest in the Estate, either by way of investment or to enable them ultimately to erect 
a house for their own occupation. During the summer months any plot on the estate will be sold on the 
following terms : ^5 preliminary payment and the balance payable by monthly or quarterly instalments 
at the purchaser's option extending over a period of seven years ; a first payment of ^5 and a monthly 
payment of £1 2s. 8d. will buy a ^100 plot of land, which at the present rate of development should be 
worth much more by the time the instalments are paid 

A SAFE METHOD OF SAVING. 

It would be difficult to suggest an easier way of saving j£ioo or a safer investment for it. The 
Directors of Gidea Park will pay all law costs, and as soon as the purchase is complete the purchaser will 
get a Deed of Conveyance free of cost and free of taxes. 

IMMEDIATE POSSESSION. 

The Purchaser obtains immediate possession as soon as the Contract is signed and the deposit paid. 
He may, if he likes, use the plot as a garden and plant it with trees, and so increase the value, until the 
time comes to build on it or re-sell. 

IMPORTANT PRIVILEGE TO PURCHASERS. 

The purchase of a plot in Gidea Park carries with it an important privilege. As soon as^the purchase 
of the land is completed the Company will, if desired, submit plans for a house to suit the purchaser's require- 
ments free of cost. If the plans are not satisfactory, fresh plans will be submitted. When the plans are 
finally approved by the purchaser the Company will arrange to lend the purchaser the entire cost of building 
a house for himself, repayable by instalments extending over 10, 15 or 20 years. 

THE ADVANTAGE OF HOUSE PURCHASE BY INSTALMENTS. 

It will cost less to purchase a well-built, comfortable house by instalments than to pay rent for an 
ordinary suburban house. An investment in a house and garden in Gidea Park pays more than Consols, 
and gives in addition the pleasure of ownership of a good house and garden in unspoilt rural surroundings. 

PRIVILEGES OFFERED TO PLOT PURCHASERS. 

(1) Unpaid instalments can be paid up any time before due at a discount or \°L per annum. 

(2) If a purchaser dies before his instalments are all paid, his executors will either complete or receive 

back all instalments paid, without deduction, as they may prefer. 

(3) On completion of the purchase the purchaser is entitled to have building plans prepared for him 

free of charge and to be advanced the entire cost of building a house for himself. 
This offer is made for the summer of 191 1 only. 
For further particulars apply to the Secretary, Gidea Park, Limited, 33 Henrietta Street, Strand, W.C. 



XI 



UNFAMILIAR ESSEX 



A S you leave Liverpool Street the line carries you sometimes on the flats, 
L % sometimes over the tops of the houses, until you reach Romford ; but 
-*- -^-there the landscape changes altogether. The land rises steeply up to 
the new station at Squirrel's Heath, Gidea Park, where the line lies in a deep 
cutting. The geological characteristics are noteworthy, pits of fine gravel and 
sand, 1 6ft. to 20ft. deep having been found when the roads of the Suburb were 
being made. The air blows in one direction from the forest land of Essex, 
and in the other from the North Sea. No possibility remains of a similar 
discovery of real country being repeated within the half-hour radius of the 
Mansion House. That as many as three hunts and a pack of harriers as well 
meet in the vicinity is an indication of the open character of the country 
round the Suburb. 



Golf without Selfishness 



FOR the lover of golf and other forms of outdoor exercise in which the 
man who must go to London daily may engage, the Romford Garden 
Suburb must seem an ideal place. While means of recreation are at his 
very door, his wife suffers from none of the inconveniences familiar to house- 
holds which are ordinarily set up to be within easy reach of a golf course, and 
there are schools for his children. Along with the fine course on which James 
Braid established his reputation, there is close at hand a fine old market town 
and a service of trains, which, when the suburban Great Eastern is electrified, 
will be even quicker and more convenient than it is to-day. The railway 
station for the Exhibition is the new and modern one, called Gidea Park and 
Squirrel's Heath, and was specially opened by the Great Eastern for the con- 
venience of the suburb. It is within twenty-five minutes of the City on the 
main line. 



xn 



All you want for 
Rose Pergolas 

Our System of dealing with Rose Pergolas is always much appreciated, 
because we both design the frames and supply the best Roses for 
growing with them. Look around your garden and select a spot 
which could be made beautiful by one of our artistic creations. 



SEND for CATALOGUES of 

Ornamental Trees and 

Shrubs 
Forest Trees 
Roses 

Covert Plants 
Fruit Trees 
Herbaceous Plants 
Waterside Plants 
Water Lilies 



SEND FOR PRICES FOR 

Transplanting Large 
Trees 

Planting by Contract 

Road Making 

Tennis Lawns 

Croquet Lawns 

Fencing, etc. 



Clipped Pyramid Golden Yews 

A Great Speciality. 

Removal of Large Trees 

Trees up to 50ft. Remoyed any distance. 

INSPECTION INVITED 

WILLIAM BARRON & SON, Ltd., 

Landscape Gardeners and Nurserymen, 
BORROWASH, near Derby, and Gidea Park, Romford. 

ESTABLISHED 50 YEARS. 




Rose Pergola, erected 3 
& Son, Ltd. Photos 



d planted bv 
aph taken t 



William Barron 
wo years after. 




Xlll 



JONES 



AND 



ANDREWS 

BUILDERS 

CONTRACTORS 

DECORATORS 



CRESCENT WORKS 
BECKENHAM, S.E. 




HOUSE RECENTLY ERECTED at WALBERSWICK, SUFFOLK, TO THE 
DESIGNS OF Messrs. FAIR & MYER, A.R.I. B.A., 39 FURNIVAL ST., E.C. 



WORKS EXECUTED TOWN OR COUNTRY. 

WE HAVE ERECTED SEVERAL HOUSES IN GIDEA PARK. 




THE 



HEAPED' FIRE 



(BRJTTS -.TJTENT) 



ONE OF OUR PATENT "HEAfED" FIRES IN NEW 
HOUSE FO R T. M. WILSON, ESQ., HAMPSTEAD WAY. 



BRITISH MANUFACTURE 

THE bright, incandescent fire gives out a great 
heat into the room, and owing to the construction 
of the fire this result is obtained with a minimum of 
fuel ; the hearth, too, is always clean — thus a saving 
both in fuel and labour is effected. Inexpensive but 
attractive designs are on view at 10 Mortimer Street. 

Call and see Stove burning in our Showrooms 

AVOID SUBSTITUTES 

Illustrated Trice List, with Testimonials, from the Sole {Makers 

BRATT, COLBRAN & CO. 



HEAPED FIRE CO. LTD. 

10 MORTIMER STREET, LONDON, W. 

CONTRACTORS TO THE ADMIRALTY AND WAR OFFICE 



XIV 



RICHARD BANYARD 

DAIRY FARMER, NELMES FARM, ROMFORD 



DELIVERIES 
THREE 
TIMES 
DAILY 




IN 

ROMFORD 

HORNCHURCH 

AND 

HAROLD 

WOOD 

DISTRICTS 



One of the many, numbering 130, specially selected for the production of High-Grade Milk. 

PURE MILK DIRECT FROM FARM TO CONSUMER 



Telephone : 12994 Central. 
Telegraphic^Address : " Mattopar, London.' 



Mattock & Parsons 

BUILDING 

CONTRACTORS 

165 Gray's Inn Road,W.C. 



SOME OF THE WORKS 
RECENTLY EXECUTED 



£2,000 
£7,000 
£3,000 
£7,000 



Sorting Office, Winchmore Hill, H.M.O.W. ... 

Laundry Buildings, Kew Bridge 

Laundry Buildings, Willesden Green 

Block of Warehouses, off City Road 

Semi-detached Superior Residences, Garden 

City, Letchworth 

Shops and Flats, Peckham 

School Buildings, Westbourne Park 

All Saints Orphanage, near St. Albans 

Extension of "City Press" Buildings 

Cottage Hospital, Hornsey 

Institutional Building, Plaistow 

Residential Hotel Premises, Holborn 

Office Buildings, Holborn 

Shops and Flats over, Holborn 

Alterations to Drapery establishment, Wood 

Green 

Country Residence, Buckinghamshire 

Decorative Repairs to first-class Residential Property 
Alterations and additions to Bank Premises. 
Alterations Factory Premises to L.C.C. requirements. 
Contractors to Town Planning and Garden Cities Co., 

Ltd., Romford Garden Suburb. 



£2,000 

£2,000 

£6,000 

£11,000 

£3,000 

£4,000 

. £4,000 

. £3,000 

. £-',500 

£3,000 

£1,300 
SI, 700 



BOOKS for THOSE 
ABOUT TO BUILD 



HOW TO PLAN A HOUSE. A Book for all 

about to Build. By GEORGE GORDON 
SAMSON, Architect. 150 pages. 28 illustrations. 
Demy 8vo. Cloth. 3s. 6d. net. 

". . . The man who is about to build will find the purchase of a 
volume a sound investment." — British Medical Journal- 

BUNGALOW RESIDENCES. A Handbook for 

all Interested in Building. By PERCIVAL 
T. HARRISON, A.M.I.C.E., M.R.S.I. 80 pages. 
Illustrated by 22 Plates and numerous text diagrams. 
Demy 8vo. Cloth. 3s. 6d. net. 

"... Extremely useful, both to the man in the street and to those 
engaged professionally in the design and erection of our 
homes." — Illustrated Carpenter and Builder. 

HOUSES, VILLAS, COTTAGES and BUNGALOWS 

For Britishers and Americans Abroad. A 
book shewing how to have them built, and what they 
ought to cost. By GEORGE GORDON SAMSON, 
Architect. 147 pages with 39 full-page and many 
other Illustrations. Including PI an s and Externa 
Views of 18 different Houses, Bungalows and Villas. 
Demy 8vo. Cloth. 3s. 6d. net. 

" Written by an architect for the information of amateurs, it 
should prove a most useful book to anyone who has in view the 
building either of a mansion or of a week-end cottage." — 

British Medical Journal. 

London : CROSBY LOCKWOOD & SON 

7 Stationers' Hall- Court, E.C., and 121a Victoria Street. S.W. 



XV 



3Bie ifiosal Ji 
TOHairant ^ 



"Co Ibis fll>ajest<e 
Iking ©corgc ID. 



WAYGOOD 




LIFTS 



Of all kinds and for all purposes. 



R.tWaygood & Co., Ltd., Falmouth Road.lLondon, S.E. 



THE INTEROVEN 

STOVE C9 UP 

78a Gt. Queen St., Kingsway, W.C. 




Oven Closed. Hot Plate 

Raised giving Slow 
Combustion Open Fire. 



Sole Manufacturers of Pascall's 
Patent "Interoven" Combined 
Sitting Room Stove and Cooking 
Range. Self-setting, Guaranteed 
Efficient. Large Oven, Hot Plate 
and High Pressure Boiler Jb+ 



Prices from 


66/8 


List Free. 


Mention this Book. 



As supplied to lead- 
ing Garden Cities. 
An Ideal Stove for 
use in Conversion 
of Houses int 
Flats, etc. 

Highest Award (Silver 

Medal) Royal Sans. 

Inst. 1910. 




The Interoven as a Cooking Stove. Oven (behind 

canopy) Open, Hot Plate closed Down, showing 

Hot-water Connectors. 



Contractors to H.M. Office of iWorks, The Home Office, etc. 

THE 

MODEL COTTAGER 

COMBINED RANGE, COPPER & BATH 

AS INSTALLED IN 

THE MODEL COTTAGE 




See page No. 144 



CORNES & HAIGHTON 

HOUSING SPECIALISTS 

BATH CHAMBERS, 240 HIGH HOLBORN 



Telegrams: 
•'COTTAGER, LONDON. 



LONDON, W.C. 



Telephone : 
5629 HOLBORN. 



T. RIDERS SON 



SOUTHWARK, S.E. 

AND 

CHISLEHURST, KENT 

AND 

SEATON, DEVON 

BUILDERS 



ESTABLISHFD 
1796 



No. 42 Heath Drive 

ROMFORD GARDEN SUBURB 

BUILT UNDER 

Mr. E. Turner-Powell, F.R.I B. A. 

(ARCHT.) 



STONE FOR GARDEN PATHS, 
OLD TILES AND OLD OAK 
:: KEPT IN STOCK :: 



XVI 



RICHARD ENMETT, Builder 

lO CITY ROAD, E.C. 




House on Plot No. 1090, Squirrel's Heath Avenue. 

HOUSES ERECTED BY RICHARD EMMETT TO THE 
DESIGNS OF GRIPPER & STEVENSON, AND C. R. ASHBEE 
AND GRIPPER & STEVENSON. 243 REED POND WALK, 
257 HEADWAY, 316 & 322 RISEBRIDGE ROAD. 1089. 1090 & 
1091, AND 1049, ETC.. SQUIRREL'S HEATH AVENUE. 




W.J. FRYER £rC° 

(W. J. FRYER) 

BUILDERS&-CONTRACTORS 

CONTRACTORS TO 
KM. GOVERNMENT 



HENNEBIQUE FERRO CONCRETE 

BRAVINGTON WORKS 
PADDINGTON, W. 

Telephone; 4667 Padd. (3 lines). Telegrams: " Blessedly, London." 




A-LEWIN<S#SON 

BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS 

STEAM JOINERY WORKS : 
LINDSAY STREET 

1 DUKE STREET 

TELEPHONE: IT 1? HT HP T? 1? T M T 

NUMBER 99 JVLl ILKIINu 




William Hunnable & Co. 

BUILDERS 
ROMFORD 

AND 

HORNCHURCH GARDEN SUBURB 
ESTATE 



xvi 1 





Established 1805 


FRED? 
M. NOBLE 

BU I L DE R 

Chipping Ongar 
ESSEX 


Brick, Pipe, & Tile Works 





JOHN ALFRED HUNT 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

HODDESDON, HERTS 



AND 



77 HOGARTH HILL, N. 

HAS BUILT 

THE FOUR GEORGIAN 

HOUSES IN 

HEATH DRIVE 

WHICH WERE DESIGNED BY 

RONALD RJONES, ESQ. 
M.A. 



Dowsing & Davis 

BUILDERS 




ROMFORD 

SANITARY WORK A SPECIALITY 
& PERSONALLY SUPERINTENDED 

Telephone : 500 Romford 







ESTABLISHED OVER 70 YEARS 



Alfred Brown & Son 

BUILDERS, ETC. 
BRAINTREE, ESSEX 

We respectfully request a visit to 

The Cottage, Plot 305, Rise bridge Rd. 

WE HAVE CARRIED OUT THE WHOLE OF THE WORKS 
TO THE PLANS AND UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 
MR. FRANK SHERRIN, OF 44 FIMSBURY SQ., LONDON 



XVI 11 




ANAGLYPTA BEAM <s? JOIST DECORATIONS 

Beams to fit on light framing I 
Joists require JM ^no framing 



ADDRESS— 
ANAGLYPTA 
BRANCH, 
DARWEN 



Or ANAGLYPTA 
BRANCH, 

NEWMAN ST., 
LONDON, W. 




THE GARDEN BEAUTIFUL 

A fit setting for a beautiful house is a garden adorned with Kelway s 

Paeonies, Delphiniums, Gaillardias, Pyrethrums and other Hardy Herbaceous 

Plants, either arranged according to sorts, or grouped in the 



KELWAY ARTISTIC 
COLOUR BORDER 

These photographs of one of these 
borders in a garden at Great 
Beddow, belonging to Mr. Arnold 
Mitchell, the celebrated Architect, 
show something of the effect of 
the massed blooms of the Kelway 
Border, but they cannot do justice 
to the riot of ever-changing colour 
which lasts from early spring to 
late autumn. 




The Summer House in the Flower Garden at *'The Vine- 
yards,"' Great Beddow. All the flowers supplied by Ke I way's. 




The Sundial in the Flower Garden at ** The V ineyards," Great Beddow. 
A Kelway Border — all the flowers supplied by Kelway s. 

The cost of the Kelway Border is X5 1 - or 

25/- for every 10 square yards, and it can 

be planned to fit any space. 

Fuller particulars are given in 
"GARDENS OF DELIGHT" 

SIXPENCE POST FREE 

KELWAY & SON 

^he T&yal Horticulturists 
LANGPORT • SOMERSET 



Printed and Published by W. H. Smith & Son. 
54-55 Fetter l.ane, E.C., for Exhibition Committee 



mm